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The Hydro-Electric Power Commission 

of Ontario 



Sixty-First 

Annual Report 

for the Year 

1968 



This Report is published pursuant to The Power Commission Act, 
Revised Statutes of Ontario, 1960, Chapter 300, Section 10. 



620 University Ave. Toronto, Canada 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 



George E. Gathercole, ll.d. 
Chairman 



D. P. Cliff 
1st V ice-Chairman 



Robert J. Boyer, m.p.p. 
2nd Vice-Chairman 



Lt.-Col. A. A. Kennedy, d.s.o., e.d. 
Commissioner 




Ian F. McRae, d.sc. 
Commissioner 



E. B. Easson 
Secretary 



J. M. Hambley, d. eng., d.sc. 
General Manager 



H. A. Smith, m.b.e. 
Chief Engineer 



E. H. Banks 

Assistant General Manager 
Finance 



D. J. Gordon 

Assistant General Manager 

Marketing 



H. J. Sissons, M.B.E. 

Assistant General Manager 

Services 



O. S. Russell 

Assistant General Manager 
Personnel 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



Toronto, Ontario, May 5, 1969 



The Honourable W. Ross Macdonald, P.C., CD., Q.C., LL.D 

Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario 

Sir: 

I have the honour to present the Sixty-first Annual Report of The Hydro- 
Electric Power Commission of Ontario, for the year ended December 31, 1968. 

As a reflection of a dynamic provincial economy, the demands of the Com- 
mission's customers reached a peak of 9,994,400 kilowatts in December, showing 
an increase of nearly 800,000 kilowatts or 8.5 per cent over the maximum demand 
of the previous winter. When compared with peak demands in December 1967, 
they showed an even larger increase — 11.5 per cent. 

More than 1,000,000 kilowatts of new generating capacity were placed in 
service during the year. Because of the rapid rise in demands, however, even this 
was insufficient to provide a comfortable margin of reserve power. During much 
of November and December, supply and demand were in delicate balance. For- 
tunately neither major mechanical breakdowns nor adverse weather conditions 
occurred to disturb that equilibrium. The dependable peak capacity of our re- 
sources in December 1968 was 10,338,100 kilowatts. 

In 1969 another record addition of more than 1,200,000 kilowatts of new 
generating capacity is scheduled for service, 1,000,000 kilowatts at the Lambton 
thermal-electric station near Sarnia, 130,000 kilowatts at Aubrey Falls on the 
Mississagi River, and 92,000 kilowatts from the enlarged Stewartville Generating 
Station on the Madawaska River. 

In December 1968, plans were announced for two new power developments 
with a combined capacity of 5,540,000 kilowatts. The larger of the two, to be 
known as Bruce Generating Station, will be a 3,200,000-kilowatt nuclear-electric 
station on a site adjacent to the 200,000-kilowatt, Douglas Point Nuclear Power 



Station, which was placed in service in 1967. The new station, which will include 
auxiliary units with a total capacity of 45,000 kilowatts, is scheduled for initial 
service in 1975. The other new development, with a capacity of 2,295,000 kilo- 
watts will be known as Lennox Generating Station. It will be located about 20 
miles west of Kingston and is expected to begin producing power in 1974. It will 
be the first large thermal-electric station in eastern Ontario. 

The longer-range resource development program, as at present authorized, 
provides for the installation during the next ten years of units which will add nearly 
12,400,000 kilowatts to our generating facilities. Nuclear-electric installations will 
provide about 43 per cent of this additional power, conventional and combustion- 
turbine units about 52 per cent, hydro-electric developments, for so many years the 
prime source of Ontario Hydro's power, only about 5 per cent. By 1978 the 
present program would raise the installed capacity of the Commission's generating 
stations to more than 22 million kilowatts, of which nearly 50 per cent would be 
conventional thermal-electric, and about 25 per cent nuclear-electric. 

Current analyses indicate that large-scale nuclear- electric stations will provide 
electric energy at a lower cost per kilowatt-hour than fossil-fuel plants, or hydro- 
electric power developments located at considerable distance from the load centres. 
The 200,000-kilowatt unit at Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station is confirming 
the fuel economy and dependability of the Canadian nuclear concept. At Pickering 
Generating Station, just east of Toronto, work is progressing favourably, and the 
first of four 540,000-kilowatt units is expected to be in service in 1971. 

While nuclear installations have high capital cost, they have low fuel cost. 
Conversely, conventional thermal generating stations have relatively low capital 
costs but high fuel costs. While from the long-term point of view it might be de- 
sirable to concentrate exclusively on nuclear generation, scarce debenture capital 
and high interest rates, coupled with the problems of introducing a new technology, 
provide compelling reasons for continuing to build conventional thermal-electric 
stations as well as nuclear-electric stations. 

Allowing for the difficulties involved, the performance of Canadian industry 
in developing nuclear energy has been gratifying, and despite the problems that are 
unavoidable in a giant pioneering venture of this kind, we must press ahead. 
Nuclear generation, because it involves very low fuel costs, will certainly be more 
inflation-proof than conventional thermal-electric generation. Furthermore, it will 
be contributing to the advancement of a new industry in Canada, with broad im- 
plications for our whole national economy. 

Progress, however, is not made without the acceptance of problems. The 
challenge is not only to develop new nuclear plant equipment for power pro- 
duction, but also to develop sources of supply for requirements such as heavy 
water. The initial loading of Pickering Generating Station for the moderator and 
heat-transport systems will be about 2,000 tons. The larger Bruce plant, with 
construction to be completed between 1975 and 1978, will require 2,400 tons. 



To ensure that there will be adequate and economic sources of supply for 
these and other requirements for heavy water, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 
recently began to build a plant at Douglas Point, which ultimately should produce 
800 tons annually. Two heavy-water plants, both with planned 400-ton-per-year 
capacities, are now under construction in Nova Scotia. One of these plants is 
expected to be ready for operation soon, but both are somewhat behind schedule, 
and Canadian requirements for heavy water are still being met from limited and 
expensive sources in the United States. 

The relentless pressure of higher costs on almost every aspect of operations 
left the Commission no alternative but to introduce across-the-board increases in 
rates to virtually all customers. The increase in wholesale rates to municipal 
utilities, effective January 1, 1969, averaged 4.5 per cent. Many municipal sys- 
tems have been able to absorb these higher charges. Others have been obliged to 
pass them on to their customers. 

The people of Ontario have a right to expect that operating economies will be 
introduced with a view to keeping rate increases under control. The unremitting 
growth in customer demands and the forces of inflation, however, pull in the op- 
posite direction. Despite these continuing inflationary pressures, the Commission 
does its utmost to ensure that electric energy will continue to be available at a 
competitive price. One of the most effective guarantees is a soundly based market- 
ing program to encourage the growth of diverse patterns of consumption, which 
will improve revenues without adding materially to capital requirements. If 
economy of supply for our customers is to be maintained, we must use our 
facilities as advantageously as possible. 

In 1969 and the years ahead, the most urgent problems engaging the attention 
of the Commission will be the unprecedented demands that will be made on the 
new technology and capital financing to keep pace with the growth of the pro- 
vincial economy. 

During the past year the Commission enjoyed the full support and co-operation 
of its partners, the municipal utility systems, and their two organizations, the 
Ontario Municipal Electric Association and the Association of Municipal Electrical 
Utilities. My fellow Commissioners as usual made their own important contri- 
butions to the management of Ontario Hydro and my thanks go to them as well as 
to the General Manager and the whole staff. 

Respectfully submitted, 



George E. Gathercole 

Chairman 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Letter of Transmittai m 

List of Illustrations viii 

List of Tables, Charts, and Diagrams x 

FOREWORD 1 

Ten Year Statistical Summary 4,5 

Guide to the Report 6 

I OPERATION OF THE SYSTEMS 7 

Maintenance of the Systems 18 

II FINANCE 25 

Statement of Operations 29 

Balance Sheet 30 

Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies 32 

Equities Accumulated through Debt Retirement Charges 32 

Source and Application of Funds 34 

Notes to Financial Statements 35 

in MARKETING AND THE COMMISSION'S CUSTOMERS 36 

Municipalities 38 

Direct Customers 39 

Rural Electrical Service 40 

Services to Customers 42 

Reports from the Regions 43 



IV PLANNING, ENGINEERING, AND CONSTRUCTION 49 

Progress on Power Developments 57 

Transformer Stations 68 

Transmission Lines 73 

V RESEARCH AND TESTING ACTIVITIES 75 

VI STAFF RELATIONS 87 

vi 






Contents vii 

APPENDIX I — OPERATIONS 93 

The Commission's Power Resources 94 

Power and Energy Resources and Requirements 96 

Analysis of Energy Sales 98 

Total Mileage of Transmission Lines and Circuits 100 



APPENDIX II — FINANCIAL 101 

Schedules Supporting the Balance Sheet 102 

Allocation of the Cost of Power to Municipalities 108 

Sinking Fund Equities Accumulated by Municipalities 128 



APPENDIX III — RURAL 136 

Customers, Revenue, and Consumption 1959-1968 138 

Miles of Line and Number of Customers 140 

Rates and Typical Bills 144 



SUPPLEMENT — MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 145 

Financial Statements of the Municipal Electrical Utilities 152 

Rates and Typical Bills 204 

Customers, Revenue, and Consumption 232 



INDEX 255 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

Lakeview Generating Station Frontispiece 

FOREWORD 

Dock Extension, Lakeview Generating Station 2 

I OPERATION OF THE SYSTEMS 

Lambton Generating Station, near Sarnia 10 

Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station, near Kincardine 12 

Nuclear Fuel Storage 13 

Thunder Bay Generating Station, Fort William 14 

Anchor Ice Formation in Niagara River 15 

Laser Beam Used in Under-water Survey 16 and 17 

Infra-red Camera for Hot-joint Detection 18 

Madawaska River Stations Control Room 19 

Insulating Shield for Use in Live-line Work 20 

Tower Raising without Power Interruption 21 

Linemen in Training 23 

II FINANCE 

Pickering Generating Station 26 

III MARKETING AND THE COMMISSION'S CUSTOMERS 

Electrical Modernization Plan 37 

Potato Storage under Controlled Conditions 40 

Sentinel Lighting on the Farm 42 

Electrical Equipment in Commercial Kitchen 44 

Fuel Handling at Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station 45 

Line-work Equipment on Display, Barrie 46 

Commissioning Operations at Douglas Point Nuclear 

Power Station 47 

Municipal Substation in Fort William 48 

IV PLANNING, ENGINEERING, AND CONSTRUCTION 

Unit Installation at Lambton Generating Station 55 

Barrett Chute Generating Station 

Interior of Powerhouse 56 

Intake Channel Enlargement 58 

Stewartville Generating Station 59 

Barrett Chute Generating Station, General View 60 

Aubrey Falls Generating Station Main Dam 61 

Turbine-generator for Pickering Generating Station 63 

Lakeview Generating Station 

Completion of mrst Stage of Construction, 1961 66 

Installation of Eighth Unit 67 

Porcupine Transformer Station Equipment 69 

East-West System Interconnection 

Line Stringing 72 

Tower Raising 73 



Illustrations ix 

V RESEARCH AND TESTING ACTIVITIES 

Line Span under Test 76 

Self-damping Conductor 77 

Insulator String in Fog Chamber 78 

Fatigue Testing 80 

Protective Relay under Test 81 

Operations Sequence Analyzer 82 

Lightning Protection 83 

Samples from Boiler-tube Failures 84 

VI STAFF RELATIONS 

Swimming Pool at Abitibi Canyon Community Centre 89 



TABLES, CHARTS, AND DIAGRAMS 

FOREWORD 

Total Power Resources and Energy Production 3 

I OPERATION OF THE SYSTEMS 

Power Demands and Resources 

East System 8 

West System 9 

Primary Energy Demand, Seasonally Adjusted 11 

II FINANCE 

Fixed Assets, Capital, and Long-term Liabilities 27 

III MARKETING AND THE COMMISSION'S CUSTOMERS 

Primary Loads — Power and Energy 

Municipalities 38 

Direct Industrial Customers 39 

Miles of Line and Number of Customers — Rural 41 

IV PLANNING, ENGINEERING, AND CONSTRUCTION 

Power Development Program 50 

Expenditures on Capital Construction 1959-1968 51 

Microwave System 52 

VI STAFF RELATIONS 

Pension and Insurance Fund Assets 91 

APPENDIX I — OPERATIONS 

Miles of Transmission Lines and Circuits 100 

APPENDIX III — RURAL 

Sketch Map of Regions and Areas facing page 136 

SUPPLEMENT — MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

Ten-year Summary of Revenue, Consumption, 

Customers, and Average Cost 146 

Annual Energy Consumption and Average Cost 

per Kilowatt-hour 147 

Municipal Electrical Service 

Fixed Assets and Long-term Debt 148 

Revenue 149 



SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 
OF 

The Hydro-Electric Power Commission 

of Ontario 



FOREWORD 

THE Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario is a corporate entity, a 
self-sustaining public enterprise endowed with broad powers with respect to 
electricity supply throughout the Province of Ontario. Its authority is derived from 
an Act of the Provincial Legislature passed in 1906 to give effect to recommenda- 
tions of earlier advisory commissions that the water powers of Ontario should be 
conserved and developed for the benefit of the people of the Province. It now 
operates under The Power Commission Act (7-Edward VII, c. 19) passed in 1907 
as an amplification of the Act of 1906 and subsequently modified from time to 
time (Revised Statutes of Ontario, 1960, c. 300, as amended). The Commission 
may have from three to six members, all of whom are appointed by the Lieutenant- 
Governor in Council. Two Commissioners may be members of the Executive 
Council of the Province of Ontario. 

The Power Supply 

Power is provided through the facilities of two operating systems, known as 
the East and West Systems, which were still not physically interconnected at 
the end of 1968. An interconnection is being established, and the first transfer 
of power will take place early in 1969, but full interconnection between the two 
systems will not be complete until 1970. They are administered as a unit, however, 
on behalf of the 354 co-operating municipalities, and other Commission customers. 

The East System comprises six regions — Western, Niagara, Central, Georgian 
Bay, Eastern, and Northeastern — while the West System comprises only the 



j^ jjgy ^**^:fci^ljBJ 





DOCK EXTENSION AT LAKEVIEW GENERATING STATION — The last of three barges 
is manoeuvred into position prior to being filled with rock and sunk to provide a 
1,200-foot extension to the breakwater at the east side of the circulating-water 
intake channel. 

The extension is intended to protect the intake from a recurrence of conditions 
created early in 1968, when high winds from the east blew large masses of ice 
into the channel, severely restricting the flow of water and eventually resulting 
in the removal of two units from service for several days. 



The work of extending the breakwater was effectively complete before the begin- 
ning of the 1968-69 ice season. 



Northwestern Region. The dividing line between the two systems is roughly the 
boundary between the Thunder Bay District and the Districts of Algoma and 
Cochrane. The Commission maintains offices in seven suitably located cities for 
the purpose of providing local administration within the seven regions. 

The Commission is primarily concerned with the provision of electric power 
by generation or purchase, and its delivery in bulk either for resale, chiefly by the 
associated municipal utilities, or for use by certain direct customers, for the most 
part industrial. This primary aspect of operations accounts for more than 90 per 
cent of the Commission's energy sales. The remaining sales are made to retail 
customers either in rural areas or in certain communities not served by municipal 
electrical utilities. Apart from this particular operation by the Commission, retail 
service throughout the province is generally provided by the associated municipal 



Power Resources and Energy Production 







THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

TOTAL POWER RESOURCES AND ENERGY PRODUCTIOf 


1 


MILLION 
KILOWATTS 

- 10 

- 9 

- 8 

- 7 

- 6 

- 5 

- 4 

- 3 

- 2 

- 1 

n 


DECEMBER DEPENDABLE PEAK CAPACITY 






OF POWER PURCHASED 
OF COMMISSION STATIONS: 

thermal-electric 







.- 


_- 




1 1 


— 


r-i 


~~-~ 


hydro-electric 




~| - 






_- 


- 


- 




- 


- 






_ - " 




--- 




-_ 


-_-_- 


1 1 1 
1945 1950 1955 


1 

I960 


1 
1965 

BILLION 
KILOWATT-HOURS 


ANNI 


JAL ENERGY PRODUCTION 
PURCHASED 
GENERATED: 

at thermal-electric stations 




- 


- 




— 50 

— 40 

— 30 

— 20 
10 




- 


- 


at hydro-electric sta 


tior 


s 


- 


- 


= 


- _ _ 






in ~ 


in " 


._-. 


- 




— 


1 
1945 




i i i 

1950 1955 1960 


I 

1965 



4 Forexvord 

electrical utilities, which are largely owned and operated by local commissions 
functioning under the general supervision of The Hydro-Electric Power Com- 
mission of Ontario as provided for in The Power Commission Act and The Public 
Utilities Act. Under this legislation, the Commission, in addition to supplying 
power, is required to exercise certain regulatory functions with respect to the 
municipal utilities served. 

Financial Features 

The basic principle governing the financial operations of the Commission and 
its associated municipal electrical utilities is that service is provided at cost. In the 
Commission's operations, cost of service includes payment for power purchased, 
charges for operation, maintenance, and administration, and related fixed charges. 
The fixed charges represent interest, an allowance for depreciation, and a provision 
for debt retirement. The municipal utilities operating under cost contracts with the 
Commission are billed throughout the year at interim rates based on estimates of 
the cost of service. At the end of the year, when the actual cost of service is estab- 
lished, the necessary balancing adjustments are made in their accounts. Retail rates 
for the municipal utilities are established at levels calculated to produce revenue 
adequate to meet cost. 

The enterprise from its inception has been self-sustaining. The Province, how- 
ever, guarantees the payment of principal and interest on all bonds issued by the 
Commission and held by the public. In addition, the Province has materially 



STATISTICAL 



1959 



Dependable peak capacity, December thousand kw 6,155 

Primary power requirements, December thousand kw 5,556 

Annual energy generated and purchased million kwh 35,465 

Primary million kwh 31,546 

Secondary million kwh 3,919 

Annual energy sold by the Commission million kwh 32,073 

Annual revenue of the Commission (net after refunds) million $ 213 

Fixed assets at cost million $ 2,248 

Gross expenditure on fixed assets in year million $ 154 

Total assets, less accumulated depreciation million $ 2,548 

Long-term liabilities and notes payable million $ 1,786 

Transmission line , circuit miles 17,713 

Primary rural distribution line circuit miles 47,351 

Average number of employees in year 15,866 

Number of associated municipal electrical utilities 354 

Ultimate customers served by the Commission and municipal utilities thousands 1,830 



Statistical Summary 5 

assisted the development of agriculture by contributing under The Rural Hydro- 
Electric Distribution Act toward the capital cost of extending rural distribution 
facilities. 

Annual Summary 

Revenue from the sale of primary power and energy rose by 13.2 per cent 
from $366.7 million in 1967 to $415.0 million in 1968, while the cost of primary 
power allocated to customers rose by 14.5 per cent from $371.1 million to $424.8 
million. Included in the 1968 cost is a $23.6 million item representing a provision 
to the reserve for stabilization of rates and contingencies, together with interest on 
the accumulated reserve. The corresponding amount in 1967 was $16.3 million. 
Revenue from the sale of secondary energy amounting to $1.9 million was applied 
as an offset to the cost of primary power and energy, as corresponding revenue 
of $2.6 million was applied in 1967. The amount of $9.8 million by which revenue 
from sales to retail and direct customers fell short of the cost of power supply to 
these customers was withdrawn from the reserve for the stabilization of rates and 
contingencies. 

Over one million kilowatts of capacity were added in 1968, the major addi- 
tions being from three large thermal units at Lakeview Generating Station, and 
the extension of Barrett Chute Generating Station by two units. 

While work continued on certain projects already in the capital construction 
program — at Lambton, Pickering, and Nanticoke, as well as at hydro-electric 



SUMMARY 



1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 



6,526 


6,734 


7,088 


7,756 


7,776 


8,199 


8,464 


8,995 


10,338 


5,746 


5,949 


6,293 


6,797 


7,210 


7,818 


8,565 


8,964 


9,994 


37,709 


38,212 


39,885 


41,471 


44,399 


47,528 


51,753 


54,615 


58,693 


32,717 


33,861 


35,783 


37,644 


40,632 


43,584 


48,056 


51,357 


55,789 


4,992 


4,351 


4,102 


3,827 


3,767 


3,944 


3,697 


3,258 


2,904 


34,317 


34,807 


36,684 


38,466 


41,115 


44,213 


47,944 


50,725 


54,816 


229 


236 


249 


270 


289 


311 


336 


367 


415 


2,361 


2,462 


2,567 


2,665 


2,762 


2,894 


3,125 


3,361 


3,669 


132 


124 


114 


108 


110 


150 


211 


252 


329 


2,660 


2,780 


2,702 


2,753 


2,824 


2,987 


3,190 


3,443 


3,749 


1,844 


1,918 


1,938 


1,959 


1,999 


2,106 


2,237 


2,400 


2,618 


17,831 


17,971 


18,120 


18,642 


18,826 


19,050 


19,342 


19,492 


19,908 


47,896 


48,068 


48,562 


48,993 


49,173 


49,435 


49,863 


50,316 


50,534 


15,179 


15,097 


14,920 


14,387 


14,531 


14,996 


15,361 


16,651 


19,550 


354 


354 


355 


355 


357 


360 


358 


355 


354 


1,881 


1,939 


1,991 


2,042 


2,096 


2,142 


2,188 


2,246 


2,292 



6 Foreword 

sites on the Madawaska, Mississagi, and Montreal Rivers — a major decision was 
made in 1968 to proceed with two further large thermal-electric stations. In 
accordance with the Commission's policy to maintain an acceptable economic 
mix of hydro-electric, conventional thermal-electric, and nuclear-electric genera- 
tion, one of the new developments will be a 3,200,000-kilowatt nuclear-electric 
station at Douglas Point, to be known as Bruce Generating Station, and the other 
will be a 2,295,000-kilowatt conventional thermal-electric station, near Bath on 
the shore of Lake Ontario, to be known as Lennox Generating Station. 

GUIDE TO THE REPORT 

Details of the Commission's activities, which have been briefly summarized 
in the foregoing paragraphs, are given in the six sections of the Report and their 
related appendices. Operations, finance, and customer relations are dealt with in 
the first three sections. The narrative in Section I dealing with the production, 
purchase, and delivery of power is supplemented in the text by reports of weather 
conditions, maintenance, communications, and forestry, all of which are related 
to operations. Supplementary tables are in Appendix I. Section II includes the Com- 
mission's Balance Sheet, Statement of Operations, and certain supporting state- 
ments of general interest. In Appendix II are other supporting schedules and 
accounts, including the statements of municipal sinking fund equities and of the 
allocation of the cost of primary power to municipalities. In Section III, consider- 
ation is given to various aspects of marketing and of service to the three main 
groups of the Commission's customers. Supplementary information on rural ser- 
vices is to be found in Appendix III. A subsection of Section III, in the form of 
reports from the regions, deals with certain activities relative to service in municipal 
utilities. Many of these activities have involved participation by, or the assistance 
of, members of the Commission's staff. 

Engineering, construction, and research are discussed in Sections IV and V, 
the former dealing with the planning and construction of power facilities. It in- 
cludes descriptions of the more important construction projects and statistics re- 
lative to these and other facilities for the generation, transformation, and delivery 
of power. Section V contains reports on the progress of some of the tests and 
investigations being conducted by members of the Commission's Research Division. 

Section VI deals with aspects of employee relations, training, and staff ad- 
ministration. 

A large part of the Report is devoted to aspects of retail service to ultimate 
customers, especially that provided by the municipal electrical utilities. The com- 
mentary on these activities and the statistical tables applicable to them are brought 
together in a supplement to the Report entitled Municipal Electrical Service begin- 
ning on page 145. 



SECTION I 



OPERATION OF THE SYSTEMS 



DEMANDS for electric power grew strongly in Ontario during 1968. Early in 
January, cold weather led to the establishment on the Commission's East Sys- 
tem of a new primary peak demand for the winter of 1967-1968, the first winter 
peak recorded in that month since 1959. Demands then declined seasonally but 
grew rapidly again in the fall, reaching annual peaks in December on both the East 
and West Systems that totalled 9,994,400 kilowatts. This exceeded the comparable 
figure for 1967 by 1,030,600 kilowatts, the largest annual increase in the Com- 
mission's history. In relative terms the increase was 11.5 per cent, the largest 
since 1955. Total primary energy demand in the East and West Systems was 
55,789 million kilowatt-hours in 1968, 8.6 per cent more than in 1967. 

The total December dependable peak capacity of resources available to meet 
power requirements on the two systems was increased in 1968 by 1,342,800 kilo- 
watts, or 14.9 per cent, to a total of 10,338,100 kilowatts. Much of the increase 
was brought about by the placing in service of three coal-fired units at Lakeview 
Generating Station, two hydro-electric units at Barrett Chute Generating Station, 
and two combustion-turbine units at Thunder Bay Generating Station. A large 
increment of peak power is now considered as dependable at Robert H. Saunders- 
St. Lawrence Generating Station, where for some years peaking and ponding 
operations (variation through the day and during the week of flows through gen- 
erating units) have supplemented the normal output of the station by about 



8 Operation of the Systems 

200,000 kilowatts. This is done on a test basis, but within limits prescribed by the 
International Joint Commission. Since these operations over the years seem not to 
have adversely affected other interests, it was decided in 1968 to assume for 
resource purposes that peaking and ponding power would continue to be avail- 
able on a dependable basis. The remainder of the increase resulted from the 
acceptance, as dependable, of the 200,000-kilowatt unit at Douglas Point Nuclear 
Power Station and of certain combustion-turbine units, all of which had been 
operated initially in 1967. The nuclear power station, though owned by Atomic 
Energy of Canada Limited, is operated by the Commission as an integral part of 
the East System. 

The Commission generated and purchased a total of 58,694 million kilowatt- 
hours in 1968, 7.5 per cent more than in 1967. Energy generated by hydro-electric 













THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

POWER DEMANDS AND RESOURCES 
EAST SYSTEM 

KILOWATTS 


DECEMBER DEPENDABLE PEAK CAPACITY 




r 

9 
8 

7 
6 
5 
4 
3 
2 
1 




of power purchased 

of Commission generating stations 


y 


i 






/ 

t 


/T 




— DECEMBER PRIMARY PEAK REQUIREMENTS 




|-| 


/_ 

i 






r' 

7 — - 


.< 










- 




/ 




- 


* 


' 






- 






-" 




- 








- 


1 1 

1945 1950 1955 I960 


I 

1965 


™- o 



Stream-Flow and Storage Conditions 9 

resources, at 35,072 million kilowatt-hours, was up 2.6 per cent from the 1967 
level, largely because of improved flows on the Niagara and St. Lawrence Rivers 
and on rivers in the West System. The output of the thermal-electric stations was 
15,861 million kilowatt-hours, up 22.1 per cent from the 1967 level. Purchased 
energy totalled 7,761 million kilowatt-hours, up 4.5 per cent from the 1967 
figure. The rise reflected increased purchases from United States sources, and 
increased use of energy generated at Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station, which 
the Commission purchases from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. 

Stream-Flow and Storage Conditions 

In the East System, spring freshet began earlier in the year than usual and 
was relatively short and low in volume; it came to an end throughout most of the 
system before the middle of May. Most major reservoirs were closely controlled 
so as to impound water, but by the end of May, many were still below normal. 
The total volume of usable water in storage improved during the summer and 
early fall. By the end of the year, however, it had been reduced to about 16 per 
cent below normal. 













THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF Oh 

POWER DEMANDS AND RESOURC 
WEST SYSTEM 


TA 


RIG 


- 


i . 


- 

V 


KILOWATTS 
1 — 600.000 

— 500.000 

— 400.000 

— 300.000 

— 200.000 

— 100.000 




EMBErc utrtiNUrtDLL rc/\i\ u/\rAW i t 

of power purchased 

of Commission generating ste 

— *PRIMARY PEAK REQUIREMENT 


tior 
s 

A 

* - 


is 


/ 
















i-j 








4 


— 1 


m 








¥' 


.<* 


1 1 1 1 1 

1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 

*Maximum peak recorded between September and December each year. 



10 



Operation of the Systems 



The annual mean flows of the Niagara and the St. Lawrence Rivers were 
both substantially higher than in 1967, and were respectively about 12.7 per cent 
and 17.6 per cent above the ten-year moving averages. On the Abitibi and the 
Ottawa Rivers, however, annual mean flows were much lower than in 1967; in 
1968 they were respectively 1.4 per cent and 9.9 per cent below the ten-year 
moving averages. 

In the West System, lake levels declined steadily during the first few months of 
1968, and the volume of usable water in storage averaged about 25 per cent below 
normal. Throughout most of the system, freshet flows began during the second 
half of April, but in the far northwest they were delayed by cold weather until 
mid May. The freshet continued throughout the system, however, until the end 
of June, and lake levels rose steadily during this period. Heavy rainfall during 
much of the rest of the year further increased storage, which was maintained on 
the average at about 15 per cent above normal. This required spillage of con- 
siderable amounts of water in order to maintain reservoir levels at or near seasonal 
normal values. 




LAMBTON GENERATING STATION, NEAR SARNIA — The structural steel for the 
remainder of the station was erected by the autumn of 1968. The two 550-foot 
chimneys are an impressive feature of the present structure. 

The boiler for Unit 2, the first unit to be placed in operation, was fired for the 
first time in November 1968. 



Operations Summary 



11 



Operations Summary 

During 1968 there was a decline in deliveries of energy from suppliers in the 
Province of Quebec, where storage conditions were not as good as they had been 
in 1967. An arrangement whereby the Commission purchased 10,000 kilowatts 
of short-term power from the Maclaren-Quebec Power Company, in effect since 
October 19, 1967, was terminated on March 31, 1968, and in November, because 
of poor storage conditions, the Company reduced its contractual delivery by about 
10 per cent. Hydro-Quebec chose to supply part of its Gatineau contractual 
commitment from Beauharnois Generating Station from September through to 
the end of the year in order to conserve storage on the Gatineau System. 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

PRIMARY ENERGY DEMAND 



AVERAGE 
MEGAWATTS 







s 


/ \ Actual / 


A f 

- — / \ Seasonally Adjusted 








i i i i i i i i i i i 


iii lit 



6,500 



COMBINED SYSTEMS ENERGY DEMAND SEASONALLY ADJUSTED — With the regularly recurring seasonal 
pattern eliminated, the seasonally adjusted curve of load growth indicates a 1968 trend at approxi- 
mately the same slope as in 1967. 



In late November, because of delays in repairs to two Lakeview Generating 
Station units, the margin of power reserves in the East System was reduced to 
the point where the Commission thought it advisable to inform the municipalities 
that some temporary load shedding might be necessary if any serious break-down 
in generating facilities should occur. Fortunately no such contingency arose 
either in November or December, and municipal load shedding was not required, 
although on several occasions loads of certain large industrial customers were 
cut as permitted under the provisions of their interruptible power contracts. Over 
the period of the East System annual peak demand, which occurred late in the 
afternoon of December 16, these interruptible loads were cut by a total of 



\2 



Operation of the Systems 



149,000 kilowatts, leaving 9,239,000 kilowatts to be carried by system resources. 
One of the Lakeview Generating Station units that had been under repair was 
returned to service early in December, and at the time of annual peak seven 
units at the station were in operation. Later the same evening, the other unit 
under repair was returned to service, and all eight 300,000-kilowatt units at the 
station were operated simultaneously for the first time. 

During the winter of 1967-1968, the Commission was able to provide addi- 
tional power to the Great Lakes Power Corporation as assistance in meeting its 
requirements over a protracted period of severe water shortage. By late spring 
this assistance was no longer required, and by October 1968 the Corporation 
was able to resume deliveries of economy energy to the Commission. 

The Commission purchased from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 799 
million kilowatt-hours of energy generated at Douglas Point Nuclear Power 
Station during 1968. The station reached a peak output of 200,000 kilowatts for 
the first time on March 8, 1968, and was rated as dependable at that output on 
September 26. 

The current expansion in nuclear-electric operations is reflected both in staff 
increases and in a broadening range of related activity. The average number of 




DOUGLAS POINT NUCLEAR POWER STATION — Its trim tidy appearance quietly 
harmonizing with the natural surroundings, the Douglas Point Station, now in its 
third year of operation, is providing valuable experience for the operation of 
future nuclear-electric stations. Although it is still undergoing modifications, it 
operated reliably during the 1968-69 winter peak period. 



Nuclear -Electric Operations 



13 



persons receiving instruction at the Nuclear Training Centre during 1968 was 
225, including representatives from Hydro-Quebec, India, and Pakistan. 

A team of 20 has been selected for the purpose of assisting in the commission- 
ing of the CANDU-type station at Rajasthan, India, and in the training of the 
Indian operating staff there. Some have been located at the Atomic Energy of 
Canada power projects design offices in Sheridan Park to study the Rajasthan 
Power Project station-systems design in preparation for the commissioning of the 
station, while others have been gaining experience in nuclear-station operation 
and maintenance at Douglas Point and the Nuclear Power Demonstration station. 
The team is expected to go to India in the spring of 1970. A group of employees 
already experienced in nuclear-electric operations has also been engaged in design 
and commissioning study at Sheridan Park in preparation for their transfer to 
Pickering Generating Station in the spring of 1969. 

The 200,000-kilowatt Douglas Point unit was in service from time to time 
throughout 1967, more extensively in 1968, and during the 1968-69 winter peak 
period from December 1, 1968 to February 28, 1969, it operated at a capacity 
factor of approximately 47 per cent. While the fuelling machines have been accepted 
for routine use for the replacement of fuel when the reactor is shut down, further 
experience is required before fuelling under load is attempted. A demonstration 
run scheduled to take place during the winter-peak period was postponed, and 
operation was interrupted as required at the week-ends for refuelling. 

Two major planned outages took place during 1968, one between March 15 
and April 12 to permit commencement of work on changing the boiler room to a 
dry atmosphere to facilitate the recovery of heavy water, and the other between 
May 21 and July 21 for the introduction of operating improvements. Among the 
latter were improvements in the detection and correction of heavy-water leaks, 
modifications to increase tightness against leaks in the reactor building, modifi- 
cation of various components in the heat-transport system, and the commissioning 
of an additional standby diesel generator. 



FUEL STORAGE FOR DOUGLAS POINT 
NUCLEAR POWER STATION — 600 fuel 
bundles are stored in styrofoam containers 
at the plant of the manufacturer. Each 
bundle contains 19 Zircaloy tubes filled 
with cylindrical pellets of uranium oxide. 
In the reactor, this nuclear fuel which 
weighs about 33 pounds will produce the 
heat equivalent of 400 tons of coal. 




It 



Operation of the Systems 




With a resurgence of growth in demands for electric power in the Commission's 
Northwestern Region, increasing use is being made of the 100,000-kilowatt coal- 
fired unit at Thunder Bay Generating Station in Fort William, at the head of 
Lake Superior. The self-unloading ship is delivering coal taken on at a United States 
port on Lake Erie. 



The 20,000-kilowatt Nuclear Power Demonstration unit, after successful 
operation with pressurized heavy water as the heat-transport medium, was shut 
down on June 15 for major mechanical modification which would permit heat- 
transport operation in the boiling mode, and the unit was so operated when it was 
replaced in service for the 1968-1969 winter-peak period. 

In the West System, hydro-electric generation improved markedly as a result of 
the above-normal storage and run-off conditions that prevailed from June to the 
end of the year. Total hydro-electric output in 1968 was 4,029 million kilowatt- 
hours, 13.8 per cent more than in 1967. The increased hydro-electric output 
permitted secondary energy sales, suspended early in 1967, to be resumed in 
July 1968, although sales were restricted to week-day night-time periods begin- 
ning at about the middle of October. 

The coal-fired unit at Thunder Bay Generating Station was used to generate 
110.8 million kilowatt-hours in 1968, 18.5 per cent more than in 1967. The two 
combustion-turbine units at the station were both placed in operation early in 
1968, and were used to generate about 1.4 million kilowatt-hours during the year. 

Violent or extreme weather caused severe operating difficulties on a number 
of occasions in 1968, particularly during the first half of the year. 

Early in January, extreme cold led to the formation of anchor ice on the bed 
of the Niagara River. This sharply restricted the flow of the river, on one day by 
an average of 39,000 cubic feet per second, and for short periods by as much 
as 50,000 cubic feet per second, or more than one-third of the usual total winter 
diversion available for power production at generating stations on the Canadian 



Ice Conditions at Lakeview Generating Station 



15 



and United States shores. A concurrent effect of the cold weather was to increase 
customers' demands, and in order to maintain adequate reserves of power the 
Commission found it necessary to obtain capacity assistance from neighbouring 
systems, to cut interruptible industrial loads, and to make increasingly extensive 
use of combustion-turbine units. 

Near the middle of January, high winds from the east drove large masses of 
ice into the circulating-water intake channel at Lakeview Generating Station. The 
resulting blockage restricted flows, and forced two units out of service for inter- 
mittent but extensive periods over several days. Attempts were made first to melt 
the ice with thermite charges, and later, with some success, to remove it from 
the channel with a dragline crane. Final clearance of the blockage, however, came 
about largely as a result of a rise in water temperature and a change in the wind. 
In order to reduce or eliminate similar difficulties in future, the breakwater at 
the east side of the channel entrance has been extended 1 ,200 feet farther out into 
the lake by three barges, which have been towed into place, filled, and sunk. This 
work was essentially complete before the beginning of the 1968-1969 ice season. 
As a further remedial measure, the Commission now plans facilities that will 
divert controlled amounts of warmed circulating-water outflow into the intake 
channel in order to prevent blockage by melting the ice blown in from the lake. 



STUDY OF ANCHOR ICE FORMATION — 
Men working from the deck of an Ontario 
Hydro ice breaker are raising an ice- 
covered collector tray from the bed of 
the Niagara River where it has been sub- 
merged overnight as part of a study of 
the formation, movement, and dissipation 
of ice in rivers. 

These phenomena may significantly affect 
river flows and thus the operation of 
hydro-electric stations. They have special 
interest for the Commission, which has 
made a study of them as a contribution 
to the International Hydrologic Decade 
sponsored by the United Nations Educa- 
tional, Scientific, and Cultural Organiza- 
tion (UNESCO). 




16 



Operation of the Systems 




LASER BEAM IN UNDERWATER CON- 
TOUR SURVEY - 1 — What would 
have required weeks of work by con- 
ventional methods was completed in 
three days, when a survey of the 
bed of the lake adjacent to Lakeview 
Generating Station was carried out 
with ihe aid of a beam of light 
amplified by stimulated emission of 
radiation. 

The beam, emitted by an instrument 
mounted on a standard transit on 
shore and powered by a 12-volt 
battery, indicated the line to be 
traversed by the survey craft. 



A series of thunderstorms with extremely high winds swept across southern 
Ontario on June 1 1 . The wind toppled one tower on the 500-kv transmission line 
between Kleinburg and Hanmer Transformer Stations and three towers on the 
double-circuit 230-kv line between Hanover Transformer Station and Douglas 
Point Nuclear Power Station. Each of these lines was out of service for several 
days while temporary or permanent repairs were made. 

Strikes at aluminum plants in Massena, New York, which began on June 2, 
reduced loads at Massena and resulted in overloads on circuits extending south- 
ward from the Robert Moses-St. Lawrence Powerplant of the Power Authority 
of the State of New York. To relieve this condition, Ontario Hydro adjusted the 
phase-shifting transformer at St. Lawrence Transformer Station which controls the 
flow of power over the interconnection there with PASNY. This reversed the 
flow of circulating power around Lake Ontario from the normal direction, and 
forced excess power from the PASNY generating station to enter the Ontario 
Hydro System and flow to the Central Region via 230-kv circuits from the 
Eastern Region until after the strikes at Massena were settled on August 4. 

Severe ice storms wrought considerable damage on two occasions. On January 
13 and 14, 1968 a storm with freezing rain moved across parts of the East 
System bordering on eastern Lake Erie and western Lake Ontario, and caused 
numerous and extensive interruptions to service, particularly in the vicinity of 
London, Brantford, and Toronto. Approximately 80 line crews from the Com- 
mission's Central, Niagara, and Western Regions, aided at times by crews from 
adjoining regions, worked throughout the storm, and until service was restored to 
customers of both the Commission and the affected municipal utilities. A similar 
though fortunately less severe storm struck the areas along the shore of Lake Erie 
and around London and Niagara Falls a few days before the end of the year. 



Protection, Control, and Communications 



17 



LASER BEAM IN UNDERWATER CON- 
TOUR SURVEY - 2 — The pilot of 
the survey boat wears a blackened 
protective visor as he follows the 
laser beam path laid out for his 
survey of the depth of the lake bed. 
A two-way radio was used to locate 
the beam, which is so narrow that 
it is lost if the boat swings more 
than two feet to either side of the 
path required. 




Protection, Control, and Communications 

The increased interdependence of the utility members of the CANUSE power 
pool has required the establishment of a New York Pool Control Centre at Al- 
bany, New York. As its contribution to the co-operative effort in this operation, 
Ontario Hydro is providing telemetering to the new control centre of certain inter- 
connection loads. Corresponding information on loading on certain inter-system 
tie-lines in New York will be transmitted to the Richview Control Centre as an 
aid in system operation. 

Under a new service and interconnection agreement with Bell Canada negot- 
iated early in 1968, the Company will provide services and facilities for the Com- 
mission's communication needs and will interconnect certain Commission facilities 
with its own. The new contract, replacing an earlier agreement in effect since 
1952, will cover an initial period of five years commencing retroactively from 
January 1, 1967 and be renewable thereafter from year to year, subject to six 
months' notice of termination by either party. 

A further 100 digital demand recorders were added to the Commission's 
distribution facilities in 1968, bringing the total now installed to 400. A study 
was instituted on the feasibility of extending such a data acquisition system, with 
the possibility of using a central digital computer to provide operating, cost, and 
statistical data on a province-wide basis. 



18 



Operation of the Systems 

MAINTENANCE OF THE SYSTEMS 



Electrical Maintenance 

Two interesting new developments were introduced in electrical maintenance 
during 1968. One was the application of aerial lift equipment in the maintenance 
of high apparatus or equipment mounted on station structures. Conventional buck- 
et trucks have been used in this work, and in addition study is being given to the 
development of aerial devices specific to this purpose. The other new development 
was the use of continuous scanning by infra-red equipment in assessing the re- 
liability of electrical connections. This equipment produces an image of the thermal 
condition of all equipment within its field of coverage. Of the thousands of electri- 
cal connections examined, approximately 230 gave evidence of a need for further 
investigation. The analysis of the results so obtained will determine the frequency 
and detailed procedures required for further tests necessary to ensure economical 
maintenance of reliability for the large number of power connectors on the system. 

In the continuing work of rehabilitation of generating facilities at Sir Adam 
Beck-Niagara Generating Station No. 1, a 55,000-kva generator was rewound 
with new stator and field windings after 44 years in service. Another major 
rehabilitation program to which reference has been made in earlier Reports is 




INFRA-RED CAMERA FOR MEASURING 
TEMPERATURE RISE OF LIVE ELECTRICAL 
APPARATUS — Conveniently mounted on 
a van for use in reasonably accessible 
locations, an infra-red camera produces an 
image (see inset) of the thermal condition 
of all equipment within its field of cover- 
age. 



Electrical Maintenance 19 

that for the identification and, where necessary, the replacement of inferior high- 
voltage bushings. The most seriously deteriorated bushings have now been replaced, 
and the testing program is considered adequate for the identification of any equip- 
ment approaching a state of unreliability. 

Major equipment failures during the year were confined largely to power 
transformers. Seven large transformers required winding replacement after failure, 
among them two from a group of 215,000-kva autotransformers. Analysis of the 
failure of these two as representative of the group indicates that they are barely 
adequate for today's conditions of service on a large system. They have been 
rebuilt in accordance with the latest design, and with the use of improved mater- 
ials. A rehabilitation program for the other autotransformers in this group is being 
considered because of their capacity and function in the system. 

The generators associated with 13 combustion turbines gave some trouble 
after their installation. The rotors were removed for repairs to increase the se- 
curity of the support for the field windings. 

Fourteen members of the electrical maintenance training program who com- 
pleted the course in 1968 are now employed as power maintenance electricians. 




CENTRAL CONTROL ROOM FOR MADAWASKA RIVER STATIONS — The generating 
units and sluicegates at Mountain Chute, Barrett Chute, and Calabogie Generating 
Stations are all controlled from this room at Chenaux Generating Station on the 
Ottawa River. Control of Stewartville Generating Station will be added to the 
system when extension of the station is completed in 1969. 

The operators can use one of two duplicate consoles at their desks to select the 
station, the unit, and the function to be controlled, and to obtain a display of the 
necessary telemetered control information. 



20 



Operation of the Systems 




INSULATING SHIELD FOR LIVE-LINE WORK — Specially developed to facilitate 
bare-hand work on live lines at 27.6 and 44 kv, this polyethylene plate, three 
feet in diameter, is fitted between two skirts of an insulator to protect the lineman 
from accidental contact with the pin or cross-arm when he is tying or untying live 
conductors. 



Twenty new members joined the course in 1968, bringing the total number of 
apprentices in the program to 104 at the end of the year. 



Line Maintenance 

The restringing of 12 miles of 115-kv wood-pole transmission line between 
Stewartville Generating Station and Arnprior was completed without interruption 
to customer service. One conductor was placed out on extensions while the re- 
placement conductor was strung in. When this was introduced into the circuit, 
the former conductor was disconnected, and the process was repeated for each 
of the other two conductors. 

The completion of a two-year study of the effects of cathodic protection for 
plastic-insulated submarine cable unfortunately does not confirm the tentative 
promise of success indicated in the 1967 Report. The protection of armour by 
the installation of galvanic anodes is not now regarded as dependable. 

The use of infra-red photography in the aerial detection of hot joints in trans- 
mission lines was investigated in conjunction with work initiated by the National 
Research Council. A simulated hot joint placed on a tower near Peterborough 
was checked from a height of from 500 to 1500 feet, and the results are being 
evaluated. Consideration is also being given to the use of a helicopter equipped 






Line Maintenance 



21 



with infra-red television devices for the detection of hot joints on transmission 
lines in remote areas of the province. In more accessible locations, this work 
will be done by equipment installed in a van. 

An insulating shield to facilitate bare-hand work on live lines at 27.6 and 
44 kv has been developed. A polyethylene plate, three feet in diameter, is fitted 
between two skirts of an insulator to prevent the lineman from making accidental 
contact with the pin or crossarms when he is tying or untying live conductors. 
The operation can thus be done by hand rather than by live-line tools, with con- 
siderable saving in time. 

Preparatory to changing over a section of 12.5-kv distribution line to operation 
in 1969 at 25 kv, line crews replaced the insulators by hand, using rubber gloves. 
New work methods were developed including the mandatory use of insulated pole 
platforms. The safety rules have been revised, modern glove-testing equipment 
has been introduced, as well as simplified glove-handling procedures, and the test 
voltage to which gloves are subjected has been raised to 25 kv. 

In their line patrol activity, the Commission's helicopters inspected approxi- 
mately 120,000 circuit miles of transmission line during the year. They were also 
used extensively for survey and construction work on the East System-West 
System tie-line, transporting steel and other material in inaccessible territory, and 
logging some 2,500 hours of flying time on the transportation of line crews and 
supervisory staff. The helicopters also provided useful service in photography, ice 
control, right-of-way spraying, and other miscellaneous assignments. 



LIVE-LINE TOWER RAISING — The modifications 
necessary to permit the current-carrying capacity of 
this transmission line to be increased were carried 
out without interrupting the flow of power. Part of 
the operation required the raising of this tower by 
10 feet and the installation of a new steel base to 
maintain the increased height. 




22 Operation of the Systems 

In order to meet the need for more versatile types of helicopters, newer models 
with higher horsepower ratings are being introduced into the fleet. They will grad- 
ually replace older models, without change in the total number of machines. 

Mechanical Maintenance 

Cavitation erosion occurring over a period of years necessitated the replace- 
ment in 1968 of eight turbine runners at Kakabeka Falls Generating Station and 
two at Cameron Falls Generating Station. The material in the damaged runners 
was not suitable for being repaired. 

A turbine shaft at George W. Rayner Generating Station, which was bent as 
the result of the failure of water lubrication to the bearing, was repaired by 
machining for the removal of the bend, followed by rebuilding to size by metal 
spray. The procedure for installing temperature-sensing elements in bearings of 
this type was accelerated because of this occurrence, although such installations 
have for some time been made whenever the equipment was dismantled for main- 
tenance. 

The Commission's staff completed a major welding operation on the job after 
a crack was observed in a reheat steam chest of Unit 1 turbine at Lakeview 
Generating Station. Later in the year, repairs of a similar type were carried out 
on both reheat steam chests of Unit 4 by contractors on behalf of the manufact- 
urers. The station staff at Thunder Bay Generating Station installed major modi- 
fications on two of the four coal pulverizers. These give promise of improved re- 
liability and reduction in maintenance cost. 

The number of fitter-mechanic apprentices was raised from 10 in 1967 to 27 
in 1968. Some apprentices in the Niagara Region are being trained for prospec- 
tive employment as thermal fitter-mechanics at Nanticoke Generating Station. 

Over a period of about six years, there has been increasing evidence of 
leakage from the forebay at DeCew Falls Generating Station. By the spring of 
1968, as much as 540 gallons per minute were rising through the overburden 
about 120 feet from the downstream toe of the reservoir dike, and falling in a 
stream over the escarpment. When the reservoir level was lowered approximately 
1 7 feet below normal, a gap in the clay blanket of the reservoir bed was disclosed. 
Dye testing established this as the source of the leakage. Remedial grouting was 
later satisfactorily completed. 

Forestry 

Forestry work in the pruning and removal of trees was carried out on 16,000 
miles of transmission and rural distribution lines. Removal was required for ap- 
proximately 40 per cent of the trees requiring treatment. 

A new vehicle developed for use in this work will be available for test in the 
field early in 1969. It will have a dump body, a truck-mounted aerial device, and 
a hydraulically driven chipping unit with jib boom and hydraulic winch. The new 



Forestry 



23 



equipment is expected to be lower in purchase cost than the present type of truck 
with aerial device and trailer-mounted chipper, and also to prove less costly in 
chipper maintenance. 

In conformity with requirements of the Provincial Pesticides Act of 1967, 
approximately 300 employees normally engaged in spray operations took refresher 
courses in preparation for a licencing examination, and received the necessary 
licences for the 1968 spraying season. 

In the 1968 aerial spray program, a new "microfoil" spray boom was leased 
for a test application on 1,650 acres of right of way in the Northwestern Region. 
This device differs from the conventional diaphragm nozzle boom in that it ejects 
the spray through hundreds of steel capillary tubes resembling hypodermic need- 
les. These are mounted on the trailing edge of the boom. Preliminary observation 
indicates that the equipment is adequately effective and that it has several ad- 
vantages. There is no need to thicken the spray material, higher flying speed is 
possible with excellent control of drift, and the quantity of spray used per acre 
is lower. 

With a view to establishing a satisfactory program for future land use and 
forest management, an effort is now being made to classify the more than 100,000 
acres of land owned by the Commission. A survey of some 5,000 acres already 
completed in the Georgian Bay Region will be extended into other Regions in 
1969. 




LINEMEN IN TRAINING — One of the 
many training facilities of the Commis- 
sion's new Conference and Development 
Centre is its line maintenance section. 

The Commission will send nearly 300 
linemen to the centre for instruction in 
1969, men in the first three years of the 
course for two weeks, and those in the 
fourth year for three weeks. Two courses 
given at the centre in 1968 for municipal 
utility staff will be supplemented by 
second-year courses in 1969. 




i 



Q4 Operation of the Systems 

Approximately 103,000 seedling trees were planted during the year, the large 
majority in the Eastern and Georgian Bay Regions. 



SECTION II 



FINANCE 



IN this section of the Report, the Statement of Operations is followed by the 
Balance Sheet and three supporting statements — Equities Accumulated through 
Debt Retirement Charges, Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies, 
and Source and Application of Funds. Supporting statements and schedules are in 
Appendix II, which includes a detailed statement of the allocation of the cost of 
primary power to municipalities. This statement itemizes for each municipality 
its share of the total cost of power, the amount billed under its interim rate, and 
the resulting refund or additional charge. 

The statement of assets for the pension and insurance fund is set out separ- 
ately in the Staff Relations section on page 9 1 . 

Revenues and Costs 

Revenues in 1968 were 13.2 per cent greater than in 1967, rising by $48.2 
million to $415.0 million. While there were significant rate increases to munici- 
palities and to retail customers, the larger revenues were primarily attributable 
to growth in the demands for power. By comparison with results in 1967, revenue 
from municipalities was up by $33.3 million or 15.2 per cent, revenue from retail 
customers by $7.9 million or 9.0 per cent, and revenue from direct customers 
by $7.0 million or 1 1.9 per cent. 

25 




PICKERING GENERATING STATION — Placing concrete for the cylindrical, domed, 
reactor buildings had reached this stage of progress by the end of 1968; the con- 
crete base for the Unit 4 building is in the left foreground. The powerhouse, under 
construction to the left of the reactor buildings, will house four 540,000-kilowatt 
units. 



In 1968, interest added to the Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Con- 
tingencies has been included with the reserve provision on the Statement of 
Operations. Costs, before this reserve provision, rose from $354.7 million in 1967 
to $401.2 million in 1968. Operating, maintenance, and administrative expenses 
increased by $15.2 million. Fuel used for electric generation exceeded correspond- 
ing costs in 1967 by $10.4 million, reflecting the increasing dependence on 
thermal-electric generating facilities to meet the growth of customer requirements. 
In addition, the cost of power purchased was $5.4 million greater than in 1967. 
There was an increase of $7.5 million in interest expense, due in part to an increase 
in debt from borrowings and in part to higher rates. As a reflection of the con- 
tinued growth of fixed assets in service, the provision for depreciation was $3.2 
million more than in 1967. 

Financial Position 

Expenditures on fixed assets during the year amounted to $329.3 million, 
including $142.3 million on thermal-electric generating facilities, $50.5 million on 



Financial Position 



27 



hydro-electric generating facilities, $91.7 million on transformer stations and 
transmission lines, and $23.3 million on retail distribution facilities. 

Expenditures on thermal-electric generating facilities include the Commis- 
sion's share of expenditures on Pickering nuclear generating station which was 
$51.5 million, in addition to expenditures of $55.8 million on Lambton Generat- 
ing Station, $21.0 million on Lakeview Generating Station, and $11.9 million on 
Nanticoke Generating Station. The major outlays on hydro-electric generating 
facilities were $17.0 million on Aubrey Falls Generating Station on the Mississagi 
River, $11.2 million on Lower Notch Generating Station on the Montreal River, 
and $6.6 million on Stewartville Generating Station on the Madawaska River. 

The Commission's debt from borrowings amounted to $2,618.1 million at 
December 31, 1968, as compared with $2,399.8 million at December 31, 1967. 



MILLION 
DOLLARS 



3.500 



3.000 



2.500 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

FIXED ASSETS, CAPITAL, 
AND LONG-TERM LIABILITIES 



MILLION 
DOLLARS 



LONG-TERM 
LIABILITIES 



CAPITAL 




FIXED ASSETS AT COST 



T 

1945 



1950 



1955 



3,000 



2,500 



2.000 



1.500 



1.000 



28 Finance 

The net increase of $218.3 million during the year represents $153.1 million in 
bonds and advances and $65.2 million in notes. During 1968, the Commission 
issued bonds amounting to $165.0 million payable in Canadian funds and $105.4 
million payable in United States funds. 

Equities accumulated through debt retirement charges amounted to $675.6 
million at December 31, 1968, compared to $633.1 million at the end of 1967. 
The net increase during 1968 of $42.5 million represents charges to operations of 
$42.6 million, less an adjustment of prior years' matured equities of $0.1 million. 

The balance in the Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies 
amounted to $183.4 million at the end of 1968, up $15.9 million from the 
balance at the end of 1967. The reserve is used to moderate the effects on cost 
brought about by variations in stream flows, loads varying from the levels fore- 
cast, major physical damage to plant and equipment or their premature retire- 
ment, fluctuations in exchange on debt payable in United States funds, and other 
contingencies arising from operations. 



Statement of Operations 29 



THE HYDROELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 

(with comparative figures for 1967) 



1968 1967 



See accompanying notes on page 35. 



Revenues 

from Municipalities 252,915,270 219,599,899 

from Retail Customers 95,940,830 88,053,114 

from Direct Customers 66,106,170 59,063,324 



414,962,270 366,716,337 



Costs 

Operating, maintenance and administrative expenses 134,681,274 119,485,928 

Fuel used for electric generation 54,930,134 44,519,168 

Power purchased 17,830,484 12,412,070 

Interest (Note 1) 83,941,567 76,443,385 

Depreciation 52,999,055 49,777,989 

Debt retirement charge 42,643,028 40,290,428 

Amortization of frequency standardization cost (Note 2) . . 16,134,225 14,374,239 

Sales of secondary energy 1,935,483 2,593,333 



Total before reserve provision (withdrawal) 401,224,284 354,709,874 

Provision and interest - reserve for stabilization of rates 

and contingencies (Note 1) 23,580,124 16,342,874 



Withdrawal from the reserve for stabilization of rates and 
contingencies to offset deficit on sales to retail and 
direct customers - see page 127 9,842,138 4,336,411 



414,962,270 366,716,337 



AUDITORS' REPORT 

We have examined the balance sheet of The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario as at 
December 31, 1968 and the statements of operations and source and application of funds for the year then 
ended. Our examination included a general review of the accounting procedures and such tests of accounting 
records and other supporting evidence as we considered necessary in the circumstances. 

In our opinion these financial statements present fairly the financial position of the Commission as at 
December 31, 1968 and the results of its operations and the source and application of its funds for the year 
then ended. 

Toronto, Canada , CLARKSON, GORDON & CO. 

April 15, 1969. Chartered Accountants 



30 



Finance 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 

BALANCE SHEET AS AT 

(with comparative 

ASSETS 

1968 1967 

$ $ 

Fixed Assets (Note 3) 

Plant in service, at cost 3,228,324,552 3,036,694,503 

Less accumulated depreciation 588,861,039 539,666,041 

2,639,463,513 2,497,028,462 

Plant under construction, at cost 440,641,885 324,509,258 

3,080,105,398 2,821,537,720 



Investments (Note 4) 

Investments held for 

Reserve for stabilization of rates and contingencies .... 150,367,270 

Debt retirement fund 46,733,25 1 

Employer's liability insurance fund 4,009,615 

201,110,136 

Current Assets 

Cash and short-term investments (Note 5) 181,371,533 

Accounts receivable 79,806,192 

Coal, at cost 41,035,365 

Materials and supplies, at cost 23,824,756 

326,037,846 



136,525,025 

55,470,850 

4,003,936 

195,999,811 



152,977,676 
59,264,861 
39,890,496 
22,981,466 

275,114,499 



Deferred Charges and Other Assets 

Frequency standardization cost, less amounts written off . 
Discount and expense on bonds and notes payable, less 

amounts written off 

Long-term accounts receivable 

Other assets 



97,555,519 

25,467,265 

7,804,636 

10,789,981 

141,617,401 

3,748,870,781 



109,672,724 

22,866,965 

6,707,936 

11,449,763 

150,697,388 

3,443,349,418 



Balance Sheet 31 



COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

DECEMBER 31, 1968 

figures for 1967) 

DEBT, EQUITY, AND LIABILITIES 



Debt from borrowings 



See accompanying notes on page 35. 



1968 1967 

$ $ 



Bonds payable V»S ' 

In Canadian funds 1,770,791,800 1,725,869,800 

In United States funds ($625,176,000 U.S.) 647,404,186 537,751,033 

Notes payable 197,000,000 131,800,000 

Advances from the Province of Ontario 2,868,196 4,330,961 



Total, including $299,529,234 maturing in 1969 2,618,064,182 2,399,751,794 



Equity 

Equities accumulated through debt retirement charges .... 675,570,503 633,055,265 

Reserve for stabilization of rates and contingencies 183,410,967 167,506,931 

Contributions from the Province of Ontario as assistance 

for rural construction (Note 6) 121,297,335 120,223,511 



980,278,805 920,785,707 



Current Liabilities 

Accounts payable and accrued charges 98,489,093 75,920,554 

Accrued interest 42,346,715 37,451,841 



140,835,808 113,372,395 



Deferred Liabilities 

Customers' deposits 4,611,149 5,228,241 

Employer's liability insurance fund 5,080,837 4,211,281 



9,691,986 9,439,522 



3,748,870,781 3,443,349,418 



32 



Finance 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER 

RESERVE FOR STABILIZATION 

for the Year Ended 





Held for the 

Benefit of All 

Customers 


Balances at December 3 1 1967 . 


$ 

152,829,264 


Add: 

Interest for the year at rates approximating those earned on investments 
held for the reserve 


8,050,511 


Provision charged to operations 


14,757,134 


Net profit on redemption of bonds payable and sale of investments 


2,195,350 








177,832,259 


Deduct: 

Withdrawal to offset deficit on sales to retail and direct customers 




Grant to Ontario Municipal Electric Association 
















Balances at December 31, 1968 


177,832,259 







EQUITIES ACCUMULATED THROUGH DEBT RETIREMENT CHARGES 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 





Municipalities 


Power District 


TOTAL 


Balances at December 31, 1967 

Add: 

Debt retirement charge to opera- 
tions 


$ 

456,792,963 

27,069,097 
11,797 


$ 

176,262,302 

15,573,931 
11,797 


$ 
633,055,265 

42,643,028 


Equities transferred through annex- 






Deduct: 

Adjustment of prior years' matured 
equities 


483,873,857 
114,433 


191,824,436 
13,357 


675,698,293 
127,790 


Balances at December 31, 1968 


483,759,424 


191,811,079 


675,570,503 



Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies 
COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

OF RATES AND CONTINGENCIES 

December 31, 1968 



33 



Held for the Benefit of (or Recoverable from) 
Certain Groups of Customers 






Power District 




Municipalities 


AU 

Direct 

Customers 


Direct Customers 
Former Northern 
Ontario Properties 


Retail 
Customers 


Total 


$ 
1,115,235 

56,876 


$ 
3,265,466 

172,297 


$ 
6,674,729 

352,183 


$ 
3,622,237 

191,123 


$ 

167,506,931 
23,580,124 










2,195,350 
13,357 








13,357 










1,172,111 


3,437,763 


7,026,912 


3,826,717 


193,295,762 




6,821,644 




3,020,494 


9,842,138 
42,657 


42,657 










42,657 


6,821,644 




3,020,494 


9,884,795 




1,129,454 


3,383,881 


7,026,912 


806,223 


183,410,967 






34 Finance 

THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

STATEMENT OF SOURCE AND APPLICATION OF FUNDS 

for (he Year Ended December 31, 1968 

(with comparative figures for 1967) 

1968 1967 



Source of Funds 

Operations 
Depreciation 

Charged directly to operations 52,999,055 49,777,989 

Charged to various overhead accounts 8,681,823 6,921,133 

Debt retirement charge 42,643,028 40,290,428 

Frequency standardization amortization of cost, less 

interest on the account 12,117,205 9,985,177 

Provision and interest - reserve for stabilization of rates 

and contingencies 23,580,124 16,342,874 

Deficit on sales to retail and direct customers 9,842, J 38 4,336,411 

Other items 3,313,842 2,451,462 



133,492,939 121,432,652 



Proceeds from issues of bonds and notes, less retirements . 215,673,028 160,896,888 

Net increase in amounts held in cash and investments .... 34,583,614 56,531,632 



181,089,414 104,365,256 



Increases in accounts and interest payable 27,463,413 35,958,247 

Other items - net 755,156 1,987,524 



342,800,922 259,768,631 



Application of Funds 

Expenditures on fixed assets, less proceeds from sales, etc. 319,174,732 246,207,281 

Increases in accounts receivable 21,638,031 3,731,231 

Increases in coal, materials, and supplies 1,988,159 9,830,119 



342,800,922 259,768,631 



Notes to Financial Statements 35 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



1. Interest cost includes interest on debt from borrowings, less interest capitalized and interest earned 
on investments. In 1968, interest added to the reserve for stabilization of rates and contingencies 
has been included with the provision for stabilization of rates and contingencies. Comparative 
figures for 1967 have been adjusted accordingly. 

2. The 1968 amortization of frequency standardization cost comprises: 

Assessments to customers of the former Southern Ontario System as 
follows: 

$3.00 per kilowatt of costing load to all customers who were 

converted to 60-cycle frequency $14,769,732 

$.50 per kilowatt of costing load to all nonconverted 60-cycle 

customers 853,462 



15,623,194 



An amount equal to the net revenue on the export of 60-cycle 

secondary energy from the former Southern Ontario System 5 11,031 



Total amortization shown in the Statement of Operations $16,134,225 



3. The construction of units 1 and 2 of Pickering nuclear generating station is a joint undertaking 
with about 40% of the cost being financed by the Commission, 33% by Atomic Energy of Canada 
Limited, and 27% by the Province of Ontario, with ownership being vested in the Commission. 
Contributions by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the Province of Ontario to December 31, 
1968 have been deducted in arriving at the cost of plant under construction. If, as, and when the 
value of power and energy provided by Pickering units 1 and 2 exceeds the operating, maintenance, 
and fuel costs incurred, this excess will be shared by the three contributors in proportion to their 
contributions. The basis for determining the value of power and energy will be the fixed charges 
plus operating, maintenance, and fuel costs of units 1 and 2 at the Commission's coal-fired 
Lambton Generating Station. 

4. On December 31, 1968, investments, which are included at amortized cost, consisted of 
government and government-guaranteed bonds, $200,115,699, and corporation bonds, $994,437. 
At this date, the market value of these investments was $175,996,000. 

5. On December 31, 1968, cash amounted to $8,113,503; short-term investments, which are included 
at amortized cost (approximately market value), consisted of interest-bearing deposits with banks 
and trust companies, $111,739,925, government and government-guaranteed bonds, $44,953,105, 
corporate obligations, $11,170,000, and bank discount notes, $5,395,000. 

6. The Province of Ontario contributed $1,073,824 during 1968 as assistance for rural construction. 






SECTION III 



MARKETING AND THE COMMISSION'S CUSTOMERS 



THE TOTAL number of customers served by the Commission and the as- 
sociated municipal electrical utilities was 2,292,015 at the end of 1968, as 
shown on the following table: 

Ultimate Customers Served 

Retail customers served by 354 municipal utilities 
Retail customers served by the Commission 
In 28 communities where the Commission 

owns and operates the distribution facilities 
In rural areas 
Special (formerly direct customers having 

loads of, for the most part, under 5,000 kw 

Total retail customers 
Direct customers (including 10 interconnected systems) 

Total 2,292,015 

The distribution of energy to these groups of customers is recorded in the 
table on pages 98 and 99, where the groups are segregated in the same manner. For 
other statistical purposes, the customers in the 28 communities served by Com- 
mission-owned facilities are regarded as similar to municipal electrical utility cus- 
tomers. Both groups are therefore considered together in the introductory com- 
ment on retail service in the Municipal Service Supplement beginning on page 145. 

36 





1,709,111 


32,033 
550,685 




91 


582,809 




2,291,920 
95 






Marketing Program 



37 



For a large segment of the 
market, electricity will be the cus- 
tomers' first choice as a source 
of energy as long as it is com- 
petitive in cost. In order to en- 
sure that it remains effectively 
competitive under rapidly chang- 
ing conditions, the municipal 
utilities and the Commission re- 
cognize the increasing importance 
of a progressive, flexible, and 
well co-ordinated marketing pro- 
gram. The prime purpose of such 
a program is to encourage cus- 
tomers to expand their use of the 
available power and power-sup- 
ply facilities, and thus derive the 
maximum economic benefit to 
themselves. In particular, they 
will ensure that rate increases in 
the face of continually rising 
costs can be kept to a minimum. 

Installations of electric space- 
heating in new houses, and con- 
version to electric heating from 
other forms of heating service 
brought the total of electrically 
heated single dwellings in On- 
tario to some 50,000 at the end 
of the year. Multiple dwelling 
construction has incorporated 
electric heating in an additional 
20,000 dwelling units. While the 
single-dwelling installation rate 
still represented a substantial 20 
per cent of the new housing 
market, it was slightly off the 
pace established in 1967. 



ELECTRICAL MODERNIZATION PROGRAM 
— The versatility of the Electrical Modern- 
ization Program is exemplified in three 
homes recently changed over to the con- 
venience of electric heat. One is a large 
house of concrete construction, one a 
modest insul-brick dwelling, and the third 
an attractively proportioned, reconstructed 
school building. 




~\ : 




i 



38 



Marketing and the Commission's Customers 



Electric water-heaters were installed in 42 per cent of the new housing market 
in 1968. 

The Electrical Modernization Program encourages the renovation of older 
homes through the installation of modern electrical equipment, and the replace- 
ment of inadequate wiring and service facilities by equipment more appropriate 
for today's electrical requirements. Under the supporting finance plan, funds have 
been provided for some 500 customer projects. 

In the commercial and industrial space-heating market, the heat-by-light prin- 
ciple has marked advantages for large schools now being constructed following 
amalgamation of local school boards into regional boards. Apart from the excel- 
lent load characteristics of such installations, they have the added advantage of 
providing cooling in summer, thus offering the possibility of year-round use of 
the building. The benefits accrue not only to the local electrical utility through 
improved annual load factor, but also to the school board and ultimately to the 
tax-paying public. 

MUNICIPALITIES 

Following the amalgamation of the Widdifield and West Ferris Township 
municipal utilities with the North Bay Hydro-Electric Commission, and the ad- 
dition of the Township of Vaughan 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

MUNICIPALITIES 
PRIMARY POWER AND ENERGY DELIVERED 

BILLION MILLI 

KWH KV\ 

70 7.0 




'Power/ 


S* Annual Energy . 


"- 


- 


- 


- 


- 

















































1955 1960 1965 

*Maximum monthly sum of the coincident peak ioads 



Hydro System, the Commission was 
serving 354 municipal electrical utili- 
ties under cost contracts at the end of 
1968, as compared with 355 at the 
end of 1967. 

The cost of power supply to a 
municipal electrical utility is billed on 
an interim basis each month through 
a combination of two components, a 
demand charge and an energy charge, 
the latter at present being uniformly 
2.75 mills per kilowatt-hour to all 
utilities. The demand component is 
calculated by ascertaining the maxi- 
mum average load registered by the 
utility over any period of twenty con- 
secutive minutes in the month, and 
applying to this maximum an interim 
rate per kilowatt established for that 
utility prior to the beginning of the 
year. The maximum for the month 
of December is given for each utility 
in Statement D, since this is the month 
in which the system annual peak norm- 
ally occurs. On the other hand, the averages of the twelve monthly peaks are 
given in the Statement of the Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power, since 



Direct Customers 



30 



these averages provide the basis for some of the allocation. When the actual 
cost of supplying power and energy has been established through this allocation 
at the end of the year, the necessary debit or credit billing adjustments are made 
to reconcile interim billings with cost. 

The sum of the December peak loads of the municipal electrical utilities in 
1968 was 6,582,885 kilowatts. This exceeded the corresponding peak load of 
5,856,957 kilowatts in December 1967 by 12.4 per cent. With a few exceptions, 
the various municipal utility components of this total are given in Statement D. 
The exceptions are the peak loads for a few utilities which supplement the de- 
livery of power by the Commission either by the operation of their own generating 
facilities, or by the purchase of power from other suppliers. Where this is so, the 
peak load shown for the municipality includes this supplementary power and is in 
bold face type. 



The energy delivered to the utilities 
by the Commission during 1968 
amounted in total to 33,426 million 
kilowatt-hours, as shown in the table 
on page 98. This exceeded the 30,534 
million kilowatt-hours delivered in 
1967 by 9.5 per cent. 

DIRECT CUSTOMERS 

The direct customers of the Com- 
mission included 85 industrial cus- 
tomers and 10 interconnected utility 
systems. 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 

DIRECT CUSTOMERS 
INDUSTRIAL 

PRIMARY POWER AND ENERGY DELIVERED 



Power 



Annual Energy 



Among the 85 industrial customers 
were two new customers added in 
1968, and two large mines, first served 
in 1967, which began important opera- 
tions in 1968. These mines produced 
iron pellets for their parent companies, 
which are large steel producers. Four 
gold-mining operations of long stand- 
ing in the province were closed down 

in 1968, and following the completion of salvage operations, disposal of equip- 
ment was begun. 

The monthly sum of the primary peak loads for the direct industrial customers 
reached its annual maximum in November at 1,805,008 kilowatts. This was 
145,537 kilowatts or 8.8 per cent greater than the corresponding annual maxi- 
mum recorded in May 1967. The table on page 99 shows the disposition of energy, 
both primary and secondary, to these 85 customers and the interconnected sys- 
tems. 



40 Marketing and the Commission's Customers 

RURAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

At the end of 1968, the Commission was serving 550,685 rural customers, 
10,311 more than at the end of 1967, after allowance for the transfer of 8,448 
customers to service by the municipal electrical utilities following annexations. 
The number of farm service customers and the number of customers served under 
the general rate both declined. On the other hand, total revenue, total consump- 
tion, and average consumption per customer for all groups of customers, whether 
classified on the old or new basis, were all higher in 1968 than in 1967. For the 
first time in many years, the average cost per kilowatt-hour, reflecting recent 
upward adjustments in rates, failed to register a decline in all classes of service, 
with only summer or seasonal residential service, which had shown a 16.8 per 
cent increase in average consumption per customer, continuing the downward 
trend that has prevailed for the most part throughout the past 10-year period. 




CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT FOR 
POTATO STORAGE - By modernizing 
their methods of marketing, Ontario 
potato farmers are improving the 
profitability of their operations. One of 
the more significant recent developments 
has been the provision of on-site storage 
for crops, using electricity for drying, 
forced-air ventilation, and controlled 
humidity and temperature. 

The large fan installation above is part of 
a more than 60-horsepower ventilating 
system that circulates fresh air through 
the storage bins, one of which is shown 
below. 



Rural Electrical Service 



11 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 



NET INCREASE 
IN YEAR 



MILES OF RURAL PRIMARY LINE 



TOTAL AT 
END OF YEAF 



1940 1945 



1950 



n 



jufln 



1960 1965 



NET INCREASE 
IN. YEAR 



NUMBER OF RURAL CUSTOMERS 



TOTAL AT 
END OF YEAR 



Ha 



T 

1940 



T 

1945 



T 

1950 



T 

1955 



1960 



1965 

"DECREASE 14.542 



42 



Marketing and the Commission's Customers 




SENTINEL LIGHTING ON THE FARM — Effective as they are in lighting commercial 
areas, sentinel lights also play an important part in increasing security and con- 
venience on the farm where, by illuminating corners of the barnyard and laneways, 
they discourage night-time prowlers. 

More than 4,000 sentinel lights are rented from Ontario Hydro by farm-service 
customers. 



SERVICES TO CUSTOMERS 



Electrical Inspection 



Under The Power Commission Act, the Commission has the responsibility 
for establishing appropriate standards regarding the installation and operation of 
electrical equipment. It is also responsible for the approval of electrical equipment 
before it is acceptable for use in the Province of Ontario. This approval may be 
obtained through the Commission's adoption of reports made by the Canadian 
Standards Association Testing Laboratories or other recognized testing agencies. 
Equipment that is custom-built or of other than a regular line of manufacture 
must be inspected and approved by the Commission's Electrical Inspection Ser- 
vice. 

The requirements of the Ontario Electrical Code were amended in 1968 by 
the publication of a special Rural Electrical Code Supplement. This covers the 
installation of primary and secondary overhead lines on private property, wiring 
in farm buildings, and similar installations in non-urban areas. Another important 
revision dealt with the serious hazards arising from improper installation or in- 
adequate maintenance of electrical equipment in swimming pools or various types 
of wading and decorative pools. A ground fault interrupting device must now be 
installed for the purpose of isolating all circuits when dangerous leakage of electric 
current occurs. 



Reports front the Regions 43 

REPORTS FROM THE REGIONS 



Western Region 



With the continuing industrial expansion in the Region, new industries were 
established in 1968, and some already established industries were considerably en- 
larged. Some of the new industrial operations were conveniently located at the 
former Armed Forces base in Centralia, where almost all the available space was 
occupied by the end of 1968, marking the completion of the first phase of this 
development, which was initiated by the purchase of the property by the Ontario 
Development Corporation. Load growth has been supported also by the expansion 
of chemical industrial activity in the Sarnia area. 

The co-operative plan known as COMPEC, which co-ordinates the marketing 
effort of the municipal utilities in Essex County, completed its first full year of 
operation in 1968. The success of this venture is indicated by its 38 per cent pene- 
tration of the new housing market in electric heating, approximately twice the 
provincial average. The Windsor Utilities Commission was successful in negotiating 
the completion of almost 2,000 all-electric apartment units during the year. 

New municipal substations were built in Chatham, Exeter, Goderich, London, 
Sandwich West Township, Sarnia, Stratford, Tecumseh, Tilbury, and Windsor. In 
the areas of more marked growth in power demands, planned utility capital pro- 
grams were as much as 20 per cent higher than in 1967. 

Niagara Region 

Two new substations were added by the Burlington Public Utilities Commis- 
sion, and two by the Waterloo Public Utilities Commission to meet increased cus- 
tomer requirements. Several other utilities have enlarged the capacities of their 
stations. 

The interest which the municipal utilities are showing in placing additions to 
their distribution systems underground is demonstrated by the Kitchener Public 
Utilities Commission, which installed almost half of the 21 miles of distribution line 
added in 1968 underground, by the Burlington Public Utilities Commission, which 
similarly installed over one-third of its 15 miles of new line, and by the Hamilton 
Hydro-Electric Commission, which chose underground installation for 29,000 feet 
of low-voltage cable. 

Extensive relocation of distribution circuits in Welland was required by con- 
struction of a new channel for the Welland canal. 

In Port Colborne, the addition of three small apartment buildings, a residence 
for retarded children, and the extension to an elementary school have materially 
increased the utility's all-electric commercial load. 

Annexation of adjacent township areas by Elmira, Fergus, Hespeler, and 
Kitchener resulted in the transfer of nearly 300 customers from the Commission's 
rural service to service by the municipal utilities. 



44 



Marketing and the Commission's Customers 




The general manager of a large catering 
organization samples food offered by a 
chef in one of the kitchens of the 56-storey 
Toronto-Dominion Centre. The dining and 
entertaining requirements of an estimated 
office population of 8,000 and 30,000 
daily visitors are met from two main 
kitchens and eight food and refreshment 
facilities of various kinds. Electricity is 
used throughout for the operation of 
food-preparation, storage, cooking, and 
serving equipment. 



Central Region 

On June 20, the Richmond Hill Hydro-Electric Commission opened its new 
all-electric administrative centre in the completely renovated former post office 
building, originally built in 1936. Winter heating and summer cooling are pro- 
vided by a heat pump. 

With the purpose of ensuring greater system security and better voltage regu- 
lation, the Mississauga Hydro-Electric Commission built three municipal sub- 
stations and increased the capacities of nine other stations. These new and en- 
larged stations, designed to blend unobtrusively with their surroundings, represent 
an 80 per cent increase in utility investment in power facilities. In addition over 
86 miles of underground and 20 miles of overhead conductors were installed. 

Seven utilities in the eastern part of the Region have combined their market- 
ing effort through an agreement with Ontario Hydro to co-ordinate the efforts of 
trained sales staff within the total area they serve. In this second application of the 
COMPEC procedure to which reference was made in the 1967 Report, the acronym 
has been extended to represent a Co-operative Marketing Plan for Electrical 
Commissions. The plan should be in full operation in the summer or fall of 1969 
in the seven municipalities — Ajax, Bowmanville, Newcastle, Orono, Pickering, 
Port Perry, and Whitby — as well as in the Commission's Bowmanville Area. 

The distribution voltage in Aurora was increased from 4 kv to 13.8 kv when 
the Commission's supply voltage was raised from 27.6 kv to 44 kv. 

As part of a program to improve the appearance of distribution facilities, the 
Borough of York Hydro System removed 1,500 feet of 27.6-kv and 4-kv lines 
from overhead poles and placed them underground. Other improvement is being 



Reports from the Regions 



45 



achieved through the use of concrete poles appropriately insulated in anticipation 
of the grounded 27.6-kv distribution system to be brought into service in 1969. 

The peak load of the Toronto Hydro-Electric System in December 1968 was 
872,139 kilowatts, which exceeded the corresponding peak in 1967 by 48,353 
kilowatts or 5.9 per cent. 

Six electrically heated apartment buildings with a total of 1,519 suites were 
added to the Toronto system in 1968, two of these being in the large St. James 
Town development to which reference was made in the 1967 Report. Other major 
additions among commercial and industrial loads served during 1968 were the 
Medical Science Building at the University of Toronto, three new office buildings, 
including the second tower of the Toronto-Dominion Centre, additions to two 
hospitals, and a new plant of a large manufacturer of chocolate confections. In 
total, these represent potential ultimate loads in excess of 37,000 kilowatts. 

Early in August 1968 the new 115-kv Toronto-Duplex Transformer station 
was placed in service to meet load increases in the Yonge-Eglinton area of north 
Toronto. 

Underground facilities in the city were extended by 25 miles of underground 
15-kv power cable, 107 miles of lower-voltage power and control cables, and the 
underground conduit system was extended by 28 miles of duct, together with the 
associated transformer vaults and access conveniences. There were at the end of 



FUEL LOADING AT DOUGLAS POINT NUC- 
LEAR POWER STATION — An operator-in- 
training at the Douglas Point Power Sta- 
tion loads a fresh fuel bundle in the fuel 
elevator, which will then convey it to 
the fuelling machines. 




46 



Marketing and the Commission's Customers 




LINE-WORK EQUIPMENT ON DISPLAY — Visitors aloft in aerial buckets mounted 
on radial-arm derricks at a display sponsored by the Association of Municipal 
Electrical Utilities in Barrie had this view of operations and maintenance equipment, 
valued at more than $2 million. 

The demonstration served to acquaint utility staffs with the latest in construction 
and maintenance materials, techniques, and equipment. Delegates from as far away 
as British Columbia and Newfoundland attended. 



the year 2,533 miles of underground duct in service. In conjunction with the ex- 
pansion of underground facilities, the continuing program for the removal of cedar 
poles resulted in a decrease of 120 poles in the city and Leaside areas. 

Georgian Bay Region 

New municipal stations have been built or the capacities of stations have been 
increased to meet growing loads in Arthur, Collingwood, Gravenhurst, Huntsville, 
and Midland. With the change of distribution voltage in Victoria Harbour and 
Coldwater from 4 kv to 8kv, it has been possible to dispense with two small 
600-kva substations. 

When the Town of Midland annexed part of Tiny Township, the Midland 
Public Utilities Commission took over service to 350 customers formerly served by 
the Commission's Penetanguishene Area. 



Eastern Region 

The new electrically heated office building of the Casselman Hydro-Electric 
Commission was officially opened in the latter part of the year. 



Reports front the Regions 



47 



The Gloucester Township Hydro-Electric Commission purchased Ontario 
Hydro's Cyrville Distributing Station, effective January 1, 1968, and has made 
preparations to purchase the remaining stations which carry the municipal load. 
Nepean Township Hydro-Electric Commission similarly purchased five stations 
supplying power exclusively to the municipality, effective July 1, 1968. The Ottawa 
Hydro-Electric Commission, following the termination on September 30, 1968 of 
a contract with the Gatineau Power Company for the supply of 43,000 kilowatts 
of power and 3,565,000 kilowatt-hours of related energy, is now obtaining this 
from Ontario Hydro. Campbellford added a new 3,000-kva substation to its sys- 
tem in 1968. 

The distribution voltage was changed in Eganville and Merrickville, in the 
former from 2.3 kv to 4 kv, and in the latter from 2.3 kv to 8 kv. A transformer 
bank was installed by the Eganville Public Utilities Commission so that the output 
from the local generating station could be paralleled with the 4-kv supply from 
Ontario Hydro. 

The Peterborough Utilities Commission carried out extensive work on its 
44-kv system, building a new station and increasing the capacities of two others. 
The 4-kv underground system was extended to two subdivisions for service to 
some 380 homes. 

During 1968, the Public Utilities Commission of the City of Kingston con- 
tinued its program to change over the distribution facilities in the main commer- 
cial area from overhead to underground supply. Other major capital undertakings 



COMMISSIONING OF EQUIPMENT AT 
DOUGLAS POINT NUCLEAR POWER STA- 
TION — A technician is checking some 
of the highly complex instrumentation 
panels during commissioning operations 
for the fuelling machines. 




48 



Marketing and the Commission's Customers 




MODERN MUNICIPAL SUBSTATION — A sense of functional appropriateness and 
architectural sincerity is conveyed in this well-designed structure in moulded con- 
crete, screening a substation in the city of Fort William. 

included the construction of one mile of 44-kv underground cable through the 
centre of the city to tie in two substations, and the completion of a $1,000,000 
service centre in the northwest part of the city. 



Northeastern and Northwestern Regions 

Service to all customers formerly served by utilities in West Ferris and Widdi- 
field Townships was consolidated during the year under the administration of the 
North Bay Hydro-Electric Commission. A new schedule of rates uniformly ap- 
plicable throughout the enlarged North Bay municipality was introduced. A new 
5,000-kva substation was placed in service. 

In Hearst, further major expansion in the wood industry is indicated by the 
construction of a large chip-board plant, and in Sudbury a high rate of load 
growth is attributed to a substantial increase in employment in the nickel industry, 
with consequently increased requirements for housing and commercial services. 
Two new substations were placed in service in 1968. 

On April 16, 1968, the Provincial Department of Municipal Affairs released 
its report recommending the amalgamation of Fort William, Port Arthur, and 
parts of two adjacent townships. The amalgamation is to be effective on January 
1, 1970. Approximately 2,400 customers and 150 miles of rural distribution line 
in the Commission's Port Arthur Area will be transferred to the municipal utility 
serving the enlarged municipality. 



SECTION IV 



PLANNING, ENGINEERING, AND CONSTRUCTION 



DURING 1968 the Commission placed in service seven new generating units 
with a total installed capacity of 1,039,900 kilowatts. These included three 
coal-fired thermal-electric units at Lakeview Generating Station, near Toronto, two 
combustion-turbine units at Thunder Bay Generating Station in Fort William, 
and two hydro-electric units installed in an extension of Barrett Chute Generating 
Station on the Madawaska River. 

Though the increase in generating capacity was large, the addition of these 
units represented only a small part of the work under way in 1968 to expand the 
Commission's power resources. A number of other projects also in progress will 
add units with a total capacity of 6,858,250 kilowatts during the years from 1969 
to 1974. Of this, 653,250 kilowatts will be in hydro-electric units to be installed 
at stations on the Madawaska, Mississagi, and Montreal Rivers. Approximately 
ninety per cent of the new capacity, however, will be provided by the installation 
of large thermal-electric units. These will be coal-fired at Lambton Generating 
Station, near Sarnia, and Nanticoke Generating Station, near Port Dover on Lake 
Erie, and nuclear at Pickering Generating Station, just east of Metropolitan Toron- 
to. 

Within the current economic climate and the constraints imposed by inter- 
national treaty, there are no undeveloped hydro-electric sites in Ontario that are 
capable of economically providing sizable amounts of electric energy, although 

49 





kw. 


1969-1970 


2,000,000 


1969 


91,800 


1969 


130,150 


1970 


203,300 


1971-1973 


2,160,000 


1971-1973 


45,000 


1971 


228,000 


1971-1974 


2,000,000 



50 Planning, Engineering, and Construction 

Summary of the Power Development Program 
as at December 31, 1968 



„ . . „ , „ _ # Number of Units Installed 

System and Development Scheduled Capacity 



EAST SYSTEM 

Lambton - south of Sarnia 4 TC 

Stewartville (Extension) - Madawaska 

River 2 H 

Aubrey Falls - Mississagi River 2 H 

Wells - Mississagi River 2 H 

Pickering - east of Toronto 4 TN 

6 TCT 

Lower Notch - Montreal River 2 H 

Nanticoke - Lake Erie near Port Dover 4 TC 



TC indicates thermal-electric conventional. 

TN indicates thermal-electric nuclear 

TCT indicates thermal-electric combustion turbine. 

H indicates hydro-electric 



there are sites that are suitable for the development of stations with low-load- 
factor peaking capacity, particularly pumping-generating stations, when these are 
appropriate. Otherwise, all further large additions to the Commission's generating 
resources will have to be thermal-electric stations. Since these require long periods 
for design, component manufacture, construction, and commissioning, the Com- 
mission found it necessary in 1968 to take initial steps toward the development of 
two large thermal-electric stations which will be required to meet increments in 
power demands forecast for 1974 and later years. 

One of these, to be known as Lennox Generating Station, will be built at a site 
on Lake Ontario, near Bath, about 22 miles west of Kingston. This will be a coal- 
fired station. It will include four 500,000-kilowatt units, which are scheduled to 
be brought into service during the years from 1974 to 1977. 

Subject to the approval of the Atomic Energy Control Board, a new nuclear 
station will be built on Lake Huron, near Port Elgin, on a site adjacent to the 
200,000-kilowatt Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station. The new station, to be 
known as Bruce Generating Station, will have four 750,000-kilowatt units. One 
of these is scheduled to be in service by 1975, and all four are expected to be in 
service by 1978. The nuclear reactors will be of the CANDU type — of the same 
general design family as reactors now in operation in two generating stations in 
Ontario, and being installed at stations in the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec, 
and in India and Pakistan. All of these reactors use natural uranium as a fuel and 
heavy water as a moderator. Most also use heavy water as a heat-transport 
medium. 

To ensure the provision of supplies of heavy water adequate to meet initial 
and operating requirements for nuclear stations with CANDU-type reactors, 



Capital Development Program 



51 



Expenditures on Capital Construction, 1958-1968 






Genera- 
tion 


Transfor- 
mation 


Trans- 
mission 


Retail 
Distribu- 
tion 


Other 


Total 


1959 

1960 

1961 


$'000 

98,251 
82,506 
77,939 
59,741 
49,301 

55,908 

90,420 

131,900 

154,889 

192,772 


$'000 

20,788 
16,624 
10,693 
11,754 
12,109 

16,775 
18,734 
22,593 
30,128 
38,270 


$'000 

12,159 
12,230 
11,446 
21,118 
22,391 

16,250 
19,727 
21,607 
26,774 
53,439 


$'000 

19,996 
18,120 
18,954 
18,102 
18,073 

18,623 
18,066 
20,256 
22,280 
23,276 


$'000 

2,910 
2,559 
4,624 
3,709 
6,283 

2,565 

3,004 

*14,908 

*18,075 

*21,583 


$'000 

154,104 
132,039 
123,656 


1962 


114,424 


1963 

1964 

1965 


108,157 

110,121 
149,951 


1966 

1967 


211,264 
252,146 


1968 


329,340 




Total 


993,627 


198,468 


217,141 


195,746 


80,220 


1,685,202 



♦These figures include investment in tools and equipment, now classified as fixed assets 
but shown in previous years as current assets. 



Atomic Energy of Canada Limited will build a plant at Douglas Point which ul- 
timately will produce 800 tons of heavy water per year. This plant, scheduled to 
be ready for operation at an initial rate of 400 tons per year by 1972, will supple- 
ment the heavy-water production of facilities now under construction in Nova 
Scotia. It will require large volumes of steam which will be supplied at first from 
Douglas Point Nuclear Power Station and ultimately from Bruce Generating 
Station. The heavy-water plant as well as the two generating stations, to be known 
collectively as The Bruce Nuclear Establishment, will be operated by Ontario 
Hydro. 

Detailed comments on the various projects now under way are included in the 
subsection Progress on Power Developments which follows. This is supplemented 
first by a definitive report on Lakeview Generating Station, where the last three 
of eight units were placed in service in 1968, and also by brief notes on trans- 
former-station and transmission-line construction. 



The Microwave Communication System 

Electric faults occur only very infrequently on the high-voltage grid that con- 
nects the principal generating and transformer stations of a large modern power 
system. However, when the electrical insulation of one of the grid components 
is broken down by lightning, ice, wind, or some other phenomenon, the results 
can be serious and widespread. This is particularly true when the fault is not 
detected and isolated quickly, or when relays operate incorrectly and split the 
system into several parts, some of which have insufficient generation to meet loads. 
Adequate protection and control of the system, therefore, depend extensively on 
the ability of relay, communication, and switching equipment to detect abnormal 
electrical conditions and isolate the affected part of the system quickly. 



52 



Planning, Engineering, and Construction 



The protection and control function is particularly important in ensuring that 
each power system in an interconnected group operates properly without undue 
hazard to its neighbours. During the past 15 years or so, the tie-lines which 
connect the Ontario Hydro systems with neighbouring power systems in Canada 
and the United States have grown markedly in number and transmission capa- 
bility. This has required frequent and substantial improvements of equipment and 
techniques to maintain the ability to protect and control these interconnections as 
well as the Ontario Hydro grid at a consistently high and secure level. 



MICROWAVE PATH 
REPEATER STATION 




MICROWAVE PROTECTIVE SYSTEM 
ON THE HIGH-VOLTAGE GRID 



Faults that occur on the power grid or on an interconnection must be isolated 
in a small fraction of a second in order to minimize damage and prevent the spread 
of a disturbance. Isolation or clearing times of about a tenth of a second are now 
usually considered acceptable, and shorter times are being introduced as they are 
made possible by improved techniques and equipment. When a fault occurs on 
a transmission line or some other component of the power grid, circuit-breakers 
must be opened on both sides of the affected component. Ideally this should be 
done simultaneously to minimize the possibility of the undesirable operation of 
circuit-breakers on neighbouring components. Tripping information available at 
one end of a line section must usually, therefore, be transmitted to the other end 
of the section in order to ensure proper operation of the relays and circuit- 
breakers there. 

On the Ontario Hydro systems, the conductors of the high-voltage transmis- 
sion lines themselves have been used for many years as carriers for the signals 



Microwave Communication System 53 

necessary for protective relaying, telemetering, and voice communication. The 
Commission began to use the transmission-line conductors as information carriers 
in 1941 on a few 230-kilovolt lines which then transmitted 25-cycle power. In 
1950, it began to standardize the power system in southern Ontario to operation 
at 60 cycles per second, and at the same time continued with rapid extension of 
the 230-kv grid. These activities hastened the development of a comprehensive 
power-line-carrier communication system which by now has largely displaced the 
use of other media for relay and telemetering purposes. 

The power-line-carrier system uses coupling devices to introduce to and re- 
trieve from the conductors radio signals at various selected frequencies. Line traps 
are used to restrict signals on selected frequencies, or channels, to a particular line 
section. A conductor used in this way, however, acts as a radio antenna. Power- 
line-carrier communication is therefore regulated by the Federal Department of 
Communications, and restricted to the 50 to 200 kilocycle band of radio frequen- 
cies. The relatively small number of power-line-carrier channels that can be pro- 
vided on this radio-frequency band has made it necessary for the Commission to 
use each available channel on a number of different transmission line sections 
throughout the power grid. This has not always been a problem, but in recent 
years, the growing extent and complexity of the power grid has increased the 
difficulty in assigning to new power-line-carrier installations those frequency chan- 
nels which will not interfere with communication channels on established parts 
of the grid. 

In order to prevent incorrect tripping for faults external to a particular line 
section, the generally accepted scheme used with power-line-carrier communication 
is to transmit a signal along a line section when a fault is detected in the vicinity. 
This signal is then interrupted when the relays at both ends of a line section 
determine by comparison of voltages and currents that the fault is definitely on 
that particular section of line. 

The difficulty, or often the impossibility, of transmitting a carrier signal through 
a power-line fault provides a good reason for operating in this way. In recent 
years, however, the trend toward requirements for shorter relay and circuit- 
breaker tripping times has led to the introduction of greater complexity in the 
comparison schemes. As a result, it has become increasingly difficult to maintain 
the desired level of dependability and security. 

In view of these problems in power-line-carrier communication, and plans for 
extensive additions to the 230-kv and 500-kv transmission system, future require- 
ments for protection and control communication have been reviewed. It was deter- 
mined that the number of communication channels required would soon far ex- 
ceed that which could be made available with power-line-carrier installations. At 
the same time, engineering studies showed that a protection concept quite different 
from that of the comparison schemes would be needed to properly co-ordinate the 
relay protections on the proposed new 230-kv and 500-kv trunk lines and to 
maintain good system security without involving undesirable changes in system 
operating procedures. 



54 Planning, Engineering, and Construction 

These studies showed that a communications medium completely separate from 
the power-line conductors should be adopted for the transmission of protection 
and control information. Such a system could transmit a signal for protective pur- 
poses directly from one end of a line section to the other, and thus provide faster 
and more positive relay and circuit-breaker action than that possible with the 
comparison schemes. The new communication medium ultimately specified for 
installation on a large part of the power grid in southern and southwestern 
Ontario is known as a microwave radio system. This uses radio frequencies in the 
seven million kilocycle per second (seven gigahertz) band, and provides a large 
number of highly reliable communication channels. It thus meets communication 
requirements for protection and control and also for central display of the operat- 
ing states of various circuit-breakers, transformers, transmission lines, and gen- 
erators. Such a "state of the system" display is now considered an almost mand- 
atory requirement for effective operation of a large power grid. The microwave 
system is also compatible with communication requirements arising from the 
probable use of central computers in system dispatch and system protection, both 
of which are now being considered. 

In 1968, the Commission awarded two contracts for microwave radio systems 
to the Lenkurt Electric Company of Canada Limited. One of these systems will 
provide channels for protection and control and for voice communication along 
part of the East-West tie-line between R.H. Martindale Transformer Station, near 
Sudbury, and the new Mississagi Transformer Station, north of Thessalon. The 
other, a much larger system, will provide a communication network for the same 
purposes among the principal transformer and generating stations in southern and 
southwestern Ontario, as shown in the accompanying map. This system will 
incorporate two microwave links which had previously been installed to meet the 
special requirements of communication between Lambton Generating Station and 
Sarnia-Scott Transformer Station, and between Richview Transformer Station and 
Kleinburg Transformer Station. The Company is responsible for detailed engineer- 
ing design, construction, and testing of the two systems, both of which are 
expected to be completely in service early in 1970. 

In southern and southwestern Ontario, the microwave network will join most 
of the major transformer, switching, and generating stations with links forming 
six contiguous closed rings. Radial links will serve four outlying stations — J. 
Clark Keith Generating Station, and Essa, Seaforth, and Stratford Transformer 
Stations. The microwave transmitters will direct narrow radio beams towards re- 
ceivers at adjacent stations over a maximum transmission distance of about 30 
miles; one or more microwave repeaters will be used on most links. 

Signals will be transmitted continuously at two radio frequencies on all of the 
microwave links, and in both directions around the closed rings where the equip- 
ment will be able to select automatically the best of four available signals. The 
microwave network will therefore have the benefits of two security schemes. The 
first is based on frequency diversity, which is the provision of the same signal at 
two radio frequencies in order to allow for the loss of one or the other through 



Supply 



55 



distortion due to atmospheric conditions. The second is based on geographic di- 
versity, which is the provision of communication along alternative paths between 
each pair of stations in a closed ring to allow for the physical loss of microwave 
facilities on one path or the other. The microwave towers and antennas them- 
selves will be constructed to withstand the high winds and severe icing that some- 
times occur in southern Ontario so that there will be virtually no deflection of the 
radio beams. As a further measure to improve reliability the antennas will be 
electrically heated to prevent impairment of radio performance as a result of ice 
formation. 

When this microwave system is in full operation in 1970, the reliability of 
transmission of the radio frequency signals is expected to be at least 99.999 per 
cent. There will be an associated improvement in the reliability of protection and 
control at all major 230-kv and 500-kv terminal stations in the area covered. 

Supply 

In 1968 the Commission placed orders for goods and services with a total value 
of nearly $390 million. The major part of this was for equipment and materials 




LAMBTON GENERATING STATION — Erection of the turbine-generator for Unit 2, 
scheduled to be the first in service, was well under way by the end of the summer 
of 1968. Four 500,000-kilowatt units will be installed at the station. 



56 



Planning, Engineering, and Construction 



required in the continuing construction of new generating, transmission, and 
transformation facilities, but many orders were placed also for materials used in 
operating and maintaining the systems. During the year, about 6.3 million tons of 
coal were delivered to the coal-fired thermal-electric stations. About 10 million 
gallons of fuel oil were supplied for the 27 combustion-turbine units which were 
used for peaking service. 

Nuclear fuel is increasing rapidly in importance as a supply item. In 1966 the 
Commission made long-term arrangements with Eldorado Mining and Refining 
Limited (now Eldorado Nuclear Limited) and with Rio Algom Mines Limited for 
the supply of uranium oxide powder required for the manufacture of nuclear fuel. 
In 1967 it awarded two major contracts for the manufacture of nuclear-fuel 
bundles. One contract is with the Canadian General Electric Company Limited 
for the 19,000 bundles required for the initial loading of the reactors in the four 
540,000-kilowatt units being installed at Pickering Generating Station. The other 
is with the Canadian Westinghouse Company Limited for 4,200 somewhat smaller 
bundles required for refuelling the reactor in the 200,000-kilowatt unit at Douglas 
Point Nuclear Power Station. Both companies received initial shipments of uran- 
ium oxide powder early in 1968. By the end of the year, partial shipments on both 
orders had been made. 




BARRETT CHUTE GENERATING STATION — In this interior view, the powerhouse 
extension and the newly installed Units 3 and 4 are at the rear. One of the two 
units installed in 1942 can be seen in the foreground. 



Office and Service Buildings 57 

Office and Service Buildings 

For many years the Commission's requirement for head office space has ex- 
ceeded the capacity of its own buildings near the corner of University Avenue 
and College Street in downtown Toronto. Continuing growth in work load and 
staff numbers has brought about a steady increase in the use of rented space, 
until at present about 40 per cent of the total head office staff of approximately 
3,700 are accommodated in rented offices in several buildings in the general area. 
In 1968, however, the Commission announced plans for a new Head Office 
building, to be erected just north of the present University Avenue building, on the 
former site of the Royal Conservatory of Music at the corner of College Street. 

The new building will be of an unusual, but economical and efficient design, 
in keeping with the Provincial Government buildings and university structures in 
the immediately adjoining Queen's Park area. It will have 15 storeys, with a total 
usable floor space above ground of about 620,000 square feet. This will be more 
than sufficient to meet expected requirements when the building is complete. 
Present plans provide for the rental to other tenants of a large but decreasing part 
of the building over a period of 15 years or so. While no firm date has been set 
for the beginning of construction, the building is expected to be ready for use by 
1972 or 1973. 

Construction of a four-storey parking garage with space for 900 cars, on 
Murray Street behind the Head Office building, was completed in the fall of 1968. 
About 600 parking spaces in part of the garage are rented to Ontario Hydro em- 
ployees. The remainder of the building has been leased to the Mount Sinai Hos- 
pital to provide parking accommodation for hospital staff and visitors. 

Other buildings completed during the year include an office for protection 
and control staff at Leaside Transformer Station, an extension to the Northeastern 
Region office in North Bay, and several office and service buildings in the Com- 
mission's administrative areas. 



PROGRESS ON POWER DEVELOPMENTS 

In 1964, the Commission initiated a program to redevelop the hydraulic po- 
tential of the Madawaska River in order to provide additional low-load-factor 
peaking capacity on the East System. The first stage of this program was com- 
pleted in the fall of 1967 with the placing in service of the 139,500-kilowatt 
Mountain Chute Generating Station. Later stages initiated in 1965, provide for 
the extension of Barrett Chute Generating Station, about nine miles down stream 
from Mountain Chute, and of Stewartville Generating Station, about 17 miles fur- 
ther down stream, both of which were built and placed in service during the 
1940's. With the additional units in service, the total generating capacity and the 
rated plant flow of each of these stations will closely match those of Mountain 
Chute Generating Station. This will make it possible to operate all three stations 
as peaking plants with a minimum of water spillage and water-level fluctuation. 







INTAKE CANAL ENLARGEMENT — As part 
of the project for the extension of Barrett 
Chute Generating Station on the Mada- 
waska River, the 2,000-foot-long intake 
canal was enlarged in order to accommo- 
date the increase in flows that would be 
needed to supply the two new 55,800- 
kilowatt units. The work was carried out 
during the summer months of both 1967 
and 1968, while the two originally in- 
stalled 20,400-kilowatt units were shut 
down. The canal, deepened by about 36 
feet along most of its length and widened 
at the headworks, now carries a total 
flow of approximately 15,000 cfs when 
all four units are in full operation. 



Calabogie Generating Station, about six miles down stream from Barrett 
Chute Generating Station, is much older than either that station or Stewartville 
Generating Station, and operates at a relatively low head. The installation of 
additional units there is not considered economic, but three power-operated sluice- 
gates have been installed to permit peak flows to be passed without excessive 
water-level fluctuations in Calabogie Lake. These sluicegates, and the sluicegates 
and generating units at the other stations on the river are supervisory controlled 
from a central control room at Chenaux Generating Station on the Ottawa River, 
about 20 miles up stream from the mouth of the Madawaska River. 



Barrett Chute Generating Station (Extension) — Madawaska River 



Location 
Original Installed 

Capacity 
Additional Installed 

Capacity 
Rated Head 
In-Service 
Estimated Cost 



About 18 miles south of Renfrew. 

40,800 kilowatts in two units, 60 cycles. 

111,600 kilowatts in two units, 60 cycles. 
150 feet. 

Unit 3, September 22, and Unit 4, October 10, 1968. 
$14,600,000, including generation, step-up transfor- 
mation, and high-voltage switching at the site. 



At Barrett Chute Generating Station, the headpond is contained by a control 
dam with eight sluiceways about a mile up stream from the powerhouse, which is 
situated on the left bank of the river. Water from the headpond is conveyed to the 
powerhouse across a peninsula formed by a wide bend in the river through a 
canal about 2,000 feet long, headworks, and penstocks. Work on extension of the 



teZjL'^W' 




STEWARTVILLE GENERATING STATION — The original structure of this station on 
the Madawaska River in eastern Ontario includes three 20,400-kilowatt units, all 
placed in service in 1948. When the extension to accommodate two new 45,900- 
kilowatt units is completed in the summer of 1969, Stewartville Generating Station, 
like the recently extended Barrett Chute Generating Station and the new Mountain 
Chute Generating Station, both up stream, will be operated as a peaking plant. 



station began in 1966 with the excavation of foundations for the new penstocks 
and for the necessary additions to the headworks and the powerhouse. The two 
original units at the station were shut down during the summer months of both 
1967 and 1968 so that the canal could be drained to permit it to be enlarged 
as necessary to accommodate additional flow for the new units. Otherwise, how- 
ever, these two 20,400-kilowatt units remained in service throughout most of the 
construction period. With the completion of the powerhouse extension and the 
placing in service of the two additional units in the fall of .1968, the project was 
virtually complete. 

The turbines of the two new units are of the Francis type and were manu- 
factured by Canadian Allis-Chalmers Limited. Each is rated at 84,000 bhp under 
a net head of 150 feet. The generators, manufactured and installed by the Cana- 
dian General Electric Company Limited, are each rated at 62,000 kva ,0.90 power 
factor, operate at 120 rpm, and generate 13.8-kv three-phase, 60-cycle power. 
Two 58,000-kva, 13.8 — 115-kv power transformers, supplied by Canadian 
ASEA Electric Limited, step up this power for transmission on the 115-kv net- 
work. 



60 



Planning, Engineering, and Construction 




BARRETT CHUTE GENERATING STATION — While the two 20,400-kilowatt units 
originally installed at the station remain in operation, work proceeds on the exten- 
sion of the powerhouse and the installation of two 55,800-kilowatt units. The new 
units were placed in service in the fall of 1968, and the station now has a total 
installed capacity of 152,400 kilowatts. 



Stewartville Generating Station (Extension) — Madawaska River 



Location 

Present Installed 

Capacity 
Additional Installed 

Capacity 
Rated Head 
In-Service Schedule 
Estimated Cost 



— About eight miles west of Arnprior and 17 miles down 
stream from Barrett Chute Generating Station. 

— 61,200 kilowatts in three units, 60 cycles. 

— 91,800 kilowatts in two units, 60 cycles. 

— 146 feet. 

— Both additional units in 1969. 

— $14,470,000, including generation, step-up transfor- 
mation, and high-voltage switching at the site. 



At Stewartville Generating Station, the spillway sluices, and the headworks, 
penstocks, and powerhouse substructure for the three 20,400-kilowatt units initial- 
ly installed are included in a single concrete structure which spans the river valley. 
At the end of 1968, the addition to this structure of the headworks, penstocks, 
and powerhouse substructure for the two new units was nearly complete, and 
erection of the superstructure for the powerhouse extension was under way. The 



Aubrey Falls Generating Station 



61 



placing in service of these units, scheduled for the summer of 1969, will complete 
the extension of this station and the work now planned for the Madawaska River. 

Aubrey Falls Generating Station — Mississagi River 

Location — Just off Highway 129, about 60 miles north of Thessalon. 

Installed Capacity — 130,150 kilowatts in two units, 60 cycles. 
Rated Head — 173 feet. 

In-Service Schedule — Two units in 1969. 

Estimated Cost — $32,580,000, including generation, step-up transfor- 

mation, and high-voltage switching at the site. 

The sluiceway dam in the river channel above Aubrey Falls and the Trolling 
Lake block dam, both earth-fill structures, were completed in 1968. By the end 
of the year, construction of the main concrete dam and headworks on the left 
side of the river valley below the falls was nearly complete, and the 4,700-acre 
headpond was cleared, ready for flooding in the spring. Both units at the station 
are expected to be in service by the fall of 1969. 




AUBREY FALLS GENERATING STATION CONSTRUCTION, SEPTEMBER 1968 — The 
rising structure for the main dam at Aubrey Falls seems to dominate the sur- 
rounding landscape like the battlements of an ancient castle. It is being built on 
the east side of the Mississagi River a short distance down stream from the falls. 

Together with a sluiceway dam about a mile up stream and an earth-fill block dam 
about four miles away, it will contain a 4,700-acre headpond. 



. 



62 Planning, Engineering, and Construction 

Wells Generating Station — Mississagi River 

Location — About 17 miles north of Thessalon along Highway 129. 

Installed Capacity — 203,300 kilowatts in two units, 60 cycles. 
Rated Head — 204 feet. 

In-Service Schedule — Two units in 1970. 

Estimated Cost — $26,820,000, including generation, step-up transfor- 

mation, and high-voltage switching at the site. 

Wells Generating Station is being built about a quarter of a mile to the west 
of George W. Rayner Generating Station, where two 21,150-kilowatt units have 
been in service since 1950. Both stations will draw water from the same head- 
pond. Rock excavation for the headworks, penstocks, powerhouse, and tailrace 
of the new station is well under way, and placing of concrete for the headworks 
is expected to begin in the spring of 1969. 

Lower Notch Generating Station — Montreal River 

Location — Near the mouth of the Montreal River on Lake Timis- 

kaming, 22 miles southeast of Cobalt. 

Installed Capacity — 228,000 kilowatts in two units, 60 cycles. 

Rated Head — 230 feet. 

In-Service Schedule — Two units in 1971. 

Estimated Cost — $65,000,000, including generation, step-up transforma- 

tion, and high-voltage switching at the site. 

Lower Notch Generating Station derives its name from a short reach of the 
Montreal River just up stream from the mouth where the water cascades through 
a rock canyon about 30 feet wide and 60 feet deep. The main dam, an earth and 
rock-fill structure with a maximum height of about 180 feet will be built up 
stream from the notch. Water from the forebay will be carried through a canal 
about half a mile long, headworks, and penstocks to the powerhouse which will 
be built on the shore of Lake Timiskaming north of the river mouth. The head- 
pond will extend about 14 miles up stream, and will flood out two small generat- 
ing stations with a total installed capacity of 11,600 kilowatts. These are Upper 
Notch Generating Station, placed in service in 1930, and Fountain Falls Generat- 
ing Station, placed in service in 1914, both of which were purchased by the 
Commission in 1944. 

In 1967, the Commission retained the services of H. G. Acres, and Company 
Limited to undertake the engineering, construction supervision, and project- 
management responsibilities for the project. In March 1968, a contract was 
awarded for the construction of a diversion tunnel to carry the flow of the Mon- 
treal River around the site. Work on the tunnel was nearly complete in October 
when a consortium of large general contractors was awarded the contract for the 
construction of the main dam, intakes, powerhouse, and spillway. By the end of 
the year, these contractors had about 330 men at the site and were making fav- 
ourable progress with excavation, cofferdam construction, dewatering, and site 
preparation. Contracts have also been awarded for the turbines and generators. 



Lambton Generating Station 



63 



In 1969, work will be concentrated largely on excavation for the foundation 
of the main dam. This will consist of the removal of more than 1,000,000 cubic 
yards of sand, silt, and gravel to a depth of about 250 feet below the river bed. 



Lambton Generating Station 
Location 



14 miles 



Installed Capacity 
In-Service Schedule 
Estimated Cost 



— On the St. Clair River in Lambton County, 
south of Sarnia. 

— 2,000,000 kilowatts in four units. 

— Two units in 1969, and two in 1970. 

— $238,830,000, including generation, step-up transfor- 
mation, and high-voltage switching at the site. 

Problems associated with the manufacture of the turbine components of the 
500,000-kilowatt units for Lambton Generating Station led to some delays in 
erection during 1968. In general, however, the manufacture of components, and 
the construction and erection of equipment at the site progressed very well. The 
first phases of the switchyard and the reserve station-service system were com- 
pleted in the spring. The circulating-water system and the boiler make-up water 
treatment plant were both completed and made ready for service during the sum- 
mer months, and the erection of structural steel for all four units was finished in 
the fall. 

The first shipment of coal was received late in September, and by the end of 
the year, more than 375,000 tons had been stacked on the coal pile. The boiler of 




PICKERING GENERATING STATION — The turbine for one of the four 540,000- 
kilowatt units is shown under construction in the Scarborough Ontario plant of 
the manufacturer. The station is scheduled for initial operation in 1971. 



64 Planning, Engineering, and Construction 

Unit 2 was fired for the first time on November 25. This unit, the first in order 
of scheduled in-service dates, is expected to produce power for the first time in the 
spring of 1969. 

Pickering Generating Station 

Location — On the shore of Lake Ontario in Pickering Township, 

east of Metropolitan Toronto. 

Installed Capacity — 2,160,000 kilowatts in four units, 60 cycles. 

In-Service Schedule — Two units in 1971, one in 1972, and one in 1973. 

Estimated Cost — $570,000,000, including generation, step-up transforma- 

tion, and high-voltage switching at the site. 

The construction of Units 1 and 2 at the nuclear-electric Pickering Generating 
Station is a joint undertaking. About 40 per cent of the cost of these units is being 
financed by the Commission, about 33 per cent by Atomic Energy of Canada 
Limited, and about 27 per cent by the Province of Ontario. Ownership is vested 
in the Commission. Under these financing arrangements, the Commission's share 
will be equivalent to the cost of a comparable coal-fired station. The Federal and 
Provincial Governments will receive returns on their investments in Units 1 and 2 
to an extent that will depend on the finally established capital cost and the operat- 
ing performance of these two units. The Commission will assume the whole cost 
for Units 3 and 4. 

By the end of 1968, contracts had been awarded for all major items for the 
four units, and a considerable amount of equipment for Units 1 and 2 had been 
received at the site. The erection of structural steel for Units 1 and 2 was vir- 
tually complete and had begun for Units 3 and 4. Concrete placing for the first 
two units was well advanced. 

Nanticoke Generating Station 

Location — On Lake Erie near Nanticoke, about eight miles east of 

Port Dover. 

Installed Capacity — 2,000,000 kilowatts in four units, 60 cycles. 

In-Service Schedule — One unit in each of the years from 1971 to 1974. 

Estimated Cost — $284,000,000, including generation, step-up transforma- 

tion, and high-voltage switching at the site. 

Favourable progress was made during 1968 in the design and construction 
of Nanticoke Generating Station. At the end of the year, site preparation was 
about 75 per cent complete, and excavation and placing of concrete footings for 
the powerhouse were proceeding at a rate that would permit erection of struc- 
tural steel to begin in the spring of 1969. The excavation for the ship dock and 
the circulating-water intake forebay were well advanced. 

A novel feature of Nanticoke Generating Station will be the multi-flue chimney, 
on which work will begin in 1969. This chimney will be the first of its kind 
at a thermal-electric station in North America. It will be about 650 feet high and 



Lakeview Generating Station 65 

will include four 1 8-foot-diameter flues, one for each unit, in a concrete shell 
about 60 feet in diameter. The concentration of gas movement and heat provided 
by the combination of the four flues in one stack will make for a rapid and high 
rise of gases in the plume, and this, together with the great height of the chimney, 
will ensure good dispersion well above ground level. Electrostatic precipitators 
will remove 99.5 per cent of the suspended particulate matter from the gases 
before they reach the chimneys. 

Lakeview Generating Station 

Location — On Lake Ontario, in the Town of Mississauga, about 

one mile west of Metropolitan Toronto. 

Installed Capacity — 2,400,000 kilowatts in eight units, 60 cycles. 

In-Service Schedule — One unit in each of the years 1961, 1962, 1964, 1965, 

and 1966; Units 6, 7, and 8 in 1968. 

Estimated Cost — $275,900,000, including generation, step-up transforma- 

tion, and high-voltage switching at site. 

Lakeview Generating Station is situated on a 144-acre site about ten miles 
west of the centre of Metropolitan Toronto, which has a population of just under 
two million. Most of the site was formerly used for the Long Branch Rifle Ranges, 
but a large part was reclaimed from Lake Ontario; the centre-line of the power- 
house is near the original shore-line of the lake. 

In 1957, a decision was taken to build at this site a station which would in- 
clude initially two 300,000-kilowatt units, and which as system requirements 
increased would be extended to include ultimately six units of that capacity. 
Geological investigations at the site were completed in 1957, and an order was 
placed with C. A. Parsons of Canada Limited for the supply and erection of the 
turbine-generators for the first two units. 

On June 20, 1962, after the powerhouse for Units 1 and 2 had been completed, 
and Unit 1 had been installed and commissioned, the station was officially opened 
by the Honourable John P. Robarts, Prime Minister of Ontario, and Mr. W. 
Ross Strike, then Chairman of the Commission. Unit 2 was brought into service 
towards the end of that year. 

In 1963, the forecast of system loads resulted in a decision to extend the ul- 
timate installation at the station to a total of eight units with the last of these 
scheduled to be placed in service in 1968. Work on the project continued, and 
Units 3, 4, and 5 were brought into service, respectively in 1964, 1965, and 1966. 
The strike of Ontario Hydro construction employees that continued through much 
of 1967, and difficulties with the manufacture and commissioning of some of the 
major components seriously delayed the installation of Units 6, 7, and 8. All 
three of these units, however, were brought into service during the late summer 
and fall of 1968. 

The powerhouse is a steel-frame structure with masonry curtain walls and 
aluminum siding. Four sections of the building were fully completed in sequence 
in order to accommodate successive pairs of the eight generating units as they 



Planning, Engineering, and Construction 




LAKEVIEW GENERATING STATION, OCTOBER 1961 — In contrast with the eight- 
unit station shown in full operation in the frontispiece, this was Lakeview Generat- 
ing Station in October 1961 when only the first of the initial two units was in 
service. 



were installed and brought into service. The completed building is 1,200 feet 
long, 293 feet wide, and 192 feet high. 

The dock extends from the west side of the circulating-water intake channel ap- 
proximately 2,200 feet out into the lake. It accommodates two 27,000-ton-capacity 
self-unloading vessels, both of which can unload simultaneously. Hoppers on the 
dock feed coal from the ships to two conveyors in a tunnel. These carry the coal 
at a maximum rate of 5,000 tons per hour to a transfer house on the shore, and 
from there to a stacking tower for stock-piling in the storage yard with a capacity 
for three million tons. Coal is reclaimed from the pile by heavy tractor-dozer 
equipment, transported by two conveyors to crushers, and from there along the 
length of the powerhouse to the bunkers for each unit. 

Circulating water for condenser cooling is taken from the lake at a depth of 
20 feet by means of an open-cut intake channel. Water is pumped from this chan- 
nel through conduits, eight feet in diameter, to the eight condensers, each of which 
has a surface condensing area of 125,000 square feet. With all eight units running 
at full load, these condensers require about one million gallons of circulating water 
per minute. The water is returned to the lake slightly warmed, but otherwise un- 
affected. 



Lakeview Generating Station 



67 



A water-treatment plant clarifies, filters, and demineralizes water drawn from 
the lake to supply make-up water for the boilers. The plant has the capacity to 
treat one million gallons of water per day. 

There are eight single-furnace boilers, each of which is capable of producing 
two million pounds of steam per hour at 2,450 psig. Superheat and reheat 
temperatures are 1,000°F. All eight boilers have an efficiency of about 90 per cent, 
and each consumes 103 tons of coal per hour at maximum output. The boilers 
are suspended from drum level. Each weighs about 3,000 tons and occupies a 
space approximately 190 feet high, and 40 feet wide by 70 feet long. The boilers 
of Units 3 and 4, supplied by Combustion Engineering — Superheater Limited, are 
of the controlled-circulation, radiant type. The six others, all supplied by Babcock- 
Wilcox and Goldie-McCulloch Limited, are of the natural-circulation type. 

After passing through air preheaters at the back of each boiler, the furnace 
gases pass through mechanical and electrostatic precipitators which remove 99.5 
per cent of the fly ash before the gases enter the chimneys. There are four 490- 
foot chimneys, each of which serves two units. 

The eight turbine generators are each rated at 300,000 kilowatts. Those in 
Units 1, 2, 7, and 8 were manufactured and installed by C. A. Parsons of Canada 
Limited (later Howden and Parsons Limited). Those in Units 3, 4, 5, and 6 were 



INSTALLATION OF FINAL UNIT AT LAKE- 
VIEW GENERATING STATION — In May 
1968, the turbine-generator of Unit 8 was 
being installed. It is one of six single- 
line machines at the station. The turbine- 
generators of Units 1 and 2 are cross- 
compound machines. 

By the end of 1968, all eight 300,000- 
kilowatt units were in service. 




68 Planning, Engineering and Construction 

manufactured and installed by Associated Electrical Industries Limited. The tur- 
bine generators in Units 1 and 2 are cross-compound machines. Each of these has 
a high-pressure line and a low-pressure line, both of which drive 150,000-kilowatt, 
16,000-volt generators. The turbine generators in the other six units are all single- 
line machines, and each of these drives one 300,000-kilowatt, 18,000-volt gener- 
ator. 

Instrumentation for the control of each pair of units is housed in a control 
room located between the units. For units 5 to 8, a computer provides an electronic 
data-logging facility, and also temperature-scanning and performance calculations. 

There are eight main transformers which step power up to 230 kv for trans- 
mission over four circuits, of which three lead to A. W. Manby Transformer 
Station, and one leads to Richview Transformer Station, both in western Metro- 
politan Toronto. These transformers are all three-phase, oil-immersed, water- 
cooled units, and each is rated at 340,000 kilovolt-amperes. Two were supplied 
by the Canadian Westinghouse Company Limited, and six by the Canadian 
General Electric Company Limited. 

Combustion-Turbine Units 

In order to provide an adequate margin of reserve capacity during a period 
of rapid load growth, and a good source of stand-by power for emergencies, the 
Commission began to install combustion-turbine generators in 1965. Since then it 
has installed 27 of these units with installed capacities totalling 319,000 kilowatts 
at a number of transformer and generating stations on the East and West Systems. 
The most recently installed are two 14,150-kilowatt units at Thunder Bay Generat- 
ing Station in Fort William. One of these units was placed in service for the first 
time in January, and the other in February of 1968. 



TRANSFORMER STATIONS 

Extra-High-Voltage Stations 

At Kleinburg Transformer Station, northwest of Metropolitan Toronto, a third 
360,000-kva, 500 — 230 — 27.6-kv, three-phase autotransformer is being installed 
as a connected spare in order to improve service security. The other two auto- 
transformers at the station have been in service since the spring of 1967. At the 
new Porcupine Transformer Station, near Timmins, two 225,000-kva, 500 — 1 15-kv 
autotransformers are being installed to provide improved 1 15-kv supply in the 
area. These transformers are expected to be ready for service in the summer of 
1969. 

Work was begun in 1968 on the design of Middleport Transformer Station, 
near Hamilton, which ultimately will become part of a 500-kv network in 
southern Ontario. This network will form a wide arc around the Hamilton-Toronto 
area with a connection to the present 500-kv line from the north, and 500-kv 




imm 




EQUIPMENT FOR PORCUPINE TRANSFORMER STATION — When this 500— 115-kv 
transformer, shown being assembled in the shop of the manufacturer, was trans- 
ported 450 miles to its destination at Porcupine Transformer Station, it required 
a railway flat-car specially designed for the purpose. It is one of two transformers, 
each of 225,000-kva capacity, to be connected to the 500-kv transmission line from 
the hydro-electric stations in the James Bay watershed in order to supply the 
growing load in the Timmins area. 



lines extending to the large generating stations that will be built on Lake Huron 
and near the eastern end of Lake Ontario. Sites are being selected for 500-kv 
stations near Milton, Georgetown, Penville, Newmarket, and Claremont. Initially, 
Middleport transformer Station will serve as a terminal for 230-kv lines from 
Nanticoke Generating Station. 



Western and Niagara Regions 

Sarnia-Imperial Transformer Station, a new 230 — 27.6-kv station with two 
50,000/83, 333-kva transformers was placed in service in July 1968. Lambton 
Transformer Station with two 230— 27.6-kv, 50,000/83, 333-kva transformers 
was placed in service in August 1968. At Sarnia-Scott Transformer Station, two 



70 Planning, Engineering, and Construction 

230-kv circuit-breakers were installed to terminate the first of three circuits from 
Lambton Generating Station. 

In the switchyard at Lambton Generating Station, a 600,000-kva, 230 — 345-kv 
autotransformer was placed in service in October 1968. This permitted an inter- 
connection with the Detroit Edison Company, in service at 115 kv since December 
1966, to be converted to 345-kv operation. The autotransformer, associated 
switching facilities, and the tie-line itself which crosses the Detroit River between 
Lambton Generating Station and Detroit Edison's St. Clair Power Plant, are 
owned jointly by Ontario Hydro and the Detroit Edison Company. 

At E. V. Buchanan Transformer Station, sixteen 115-kv circuit-breakers were 
replaced by breakers of higher rupturing capacity. Work is in progress to replace 
two 115,000-kva, 230— 115-kv autotransformers with units rated at 225,000 kva. 
At Wallaceburg Transformer Station, a second 27.6-kv bus and a third 115 — 
27.6-kv transformer were installed. At London-Nelson Transformer Station two 
20,000/33,333-kva transformers were replaced by two of 45,000/75000-kva 
capacity. 

The new Hamilton-Elgin Transformer Station was completed and placed in 
service. The station has two 45,000/75,000-kva, 115 — 13.8-kv transformers, and 
switching structures of the new low-profile type. 

Facilities were expanded at Niagara-Murray Transformer Station by the 
addition of one 45,000/75,000-kva, 115 — 13.8-kv transformer, and at Elmira 
Transformer Station by the addition of one 27,000-kva, 115 — 27.6-kv trans- 
former. 

Central and Georgian Bay Regions 

At Richview Transformer Station, terminal facilities were installed for a new 
230-kv circuit that brings power into the system from the last two units at 
Lakeview Generating Station. These facilities include two 230-kv air-blast circuit- 
breakers, each of which has an interrupting capability of 25,000,000 kva, higher 
than that of any other circuit-breakers now installed on the Commission's systems. 
The addition of two 75,000/ 125,000-kva, 230— 27.6-kv transformers at the 
station will be completed in 1969. 

Toronto-Duplex Transformer Station, a new urban-type station with two 
45,000/75,000-kva, 115 — 13.8-kv transformers was completed and placed in 
service. Additional capacity was provided at Toronto-Teraulay Transformer Station 
by the installation of two 45,000/75,000-kva, 115— 13.8-kv transformers to 
replace two 20,000/33,000-kva units. Two 75,000/ 125,000-kva, 230— 44-kv 
transformers and associated switching were placed in service at the new Oshawa- 
Wilson Transformer Station. 

A second "Jones-type" station has been placed in service at the site of Cooks- 
ville Transformer Station. The new facilities, necessary to meet rapidly growing 
loads in the Town of Mississauga, consist of two 50,000/83, 333-kva, 230 — 27.6- 
kv transformers and four 27.6-kv feeder positions. 



Transformer Stations 71 

At Armitage Transformer Station, two 50,000/83, 333-kva, 230— 44-kv trans- 
formers, and facilities for supervisory control from Cherrywood Switching Station 
have been installed. The 115 — 27.6-kv transformation at the station was taken 
out of service in December 1968. At A. W. Manby Transformer Station two 
215,000-kva transformers were replaced by one of 225,000-kva capacity and one 
of 250,000-kva capacity. 

At the new Muskoka Transformer Station, one 25, 000/4 1,666-kva, 115 — 
44-kv transformer was placed in service in June 1968. A second similar trans- 
former will be installed in 1969. A new 115 — 44-kv station with three 6,667-kva, 
single-phase transformers and one spare has been placed in service at Meaford. 
Facilities have been expanded at Hanover Transformer Station by the installation 
of two 50,000/83, 333-kva, 115— 44-kv transformers to replace two 25,000/ 
41,666 transformers, and at Owen Sound Transformer Station by the addition of 
one 25,000/41, 666-kva, 115— 44-kv transformer. 

Eastern Region 

At Ottawa-Slater Transformer Station, two 45,000/75,000-kva, 115— 13.8-kv 
transformers were installed to replace two 20,000/33, 333-kva transformers, and 
a third section of 13.8-kv metalclad switchgear was added. The two previously 
installed sections of switchgear were modified to form a normally open ring bus. 
The capacity of the 13.8-kv underground cable connections from the transformers 
has been increased by a unique system of air cooling. The station has been con- 
verted to supervisory control from Ottawa-Hawthorne Transformer Station, where 
terminal facilities were installed for a new 115-kv circuit to Ottawa-Riverdale 
Transformer Station. 

The capacity of Kingston-Gardiner Transformer Station, in service since 1963, 
was doubled by the addition of a second 50,000/83, 333-kva, 115 — 44-kv trans- 
former together with the necessary switching, protection, and supervisory-control 
facilities. Two 44-kv feeder positions were added to supply a new industrial load. 

Two new 230 — 44-kv stations were placed in service. One is St. Isidore 
Transformer Station, which is operated by supervisory control from St. Lawrence 
Transformer Station. The other is Havelock Transformer Station, operated by 
supervisory control from Heely Falls Generating Station. At each of the new 
stations, one 25, 000/4 1,666-kva transformer is in service, and a second similar 
transformer is to be installed in 1969. 

An additional 25,000/4 1,666-kva, 115— 44-kv transformer has been installed 
at Sidney Transformer Station in order to augment the power supply to the 
Trenton area. 



Northeastern and Northwestern Regions 

At R. H. Martindale Transformer Station, near Sudbury, switching facilities 
have been enlarged to accommodate two new 230-kv circuit terminations which 



72 



Planning, Engineering, and Construction 




LINE STRINGING — Control is maintained by radio-telephone while about 35,000 
feet of conductor are drawn under tension into position on the towers of a new 
transmission line. This 36-mile section of line was placed in service in the spring 
of 1968 to supply construction power to the Aubrey Falls project on the Mississagi 
River. Ultimately it will form part of a 230-kv interconnection between the Com- 
mission's East and West Systems. 



form part of the new interconnection between the East and West Systems. At the 
new Mississagi Transformer Station, the construction of a 230-kv switchyard is 
in progress. When this is complete in 1969, it will provide switching for circuits 
that will carry power from Aubrey Falls and Wells Generating Stations and that 
ultimately will serve as part of the East- West interconnection. It will also include 
switching for an interconnection with the system of the Great Lakes Power 
Corporation. 

The Commission's new Wawa Transformer Station, adjacent to the Great 
Lakes Power Corporation's Anjigami Station, was ready for service at the end 
of 1968. A 75,000-kva, 115-kv regulating transformer installed there permits a 
block of generation at the company's stations on the Michipicoten River to be 
isolated from the rest of their system and connected radially to the Commission's 
West System over a new transmission line from Wawa Transformer Station to 
Marathon Transformer Station. These facilities, which serve as part of the first 
stage of the Commission's East System- West System interconnection, are operating 
initially at 115 kv. In 1969, however, the installation will be completed for 230 — 
115-kv transformation at Wawa Transformer Station and at Lakehead Trans- 
former Station, now under construction at Port Arthur. This will permit the con- 
necting transmission lines and the switching facilities at Marathon Transformer 
Station to be converted to 230-kv operation. 



Transmission Lines 

TRANSMISSION LINES 



73 



In 1966, the Commission began construction of a 230-kv interconnection 
between its East and West Systems. When completed in 1970, this will comprise 
two 230-kv circuits extending over a total route distance of 516 miles from 
R. H. Martindale Transformer Station, near Sudbury, to Lakehead Transformer 
Station, at Port Arthur. The completed interconnection will require the construc- 
tion of 424 miles of double-circuit steel-tower line and 85 miles of single-circuit 
wood-pole line. It will also incorporate a 92-mile single-circuit wood-pole line, 
which has been in service between R. H. Martindale and Blind River Transformer 
Stations for some years. 

The first stage of the interconnection, completed in 1968 and placed in service 
early in 1969, includes two new double-circuit steel-tower lines. One of these 
extends over a distance of 104 miles from Wawa Transformer Station to Marathon 
Transformer Station, and the other over a distance of 38 miles from Blind River 
to the new Mississagi Transformer Station. Facilities of the Great Lakes Power 
Corporation complete this stage of the interconnection. Power supplied to the 
West System from the Corporation's generating facilities near Wawa Transformer 
Station is replaced by equivalent power transmitted from the East System to a 
connection with the Corporation's system at Mississagi Transformer Station. A 
36-mile double-circuit steel-tower line from Mississagi Transformer Station to the 
site of Aubrey Falls Generating Station was also placed in service in 1968. This 
is being used initially to supply construction power to the generating station 
project, but ultimately it will serve as part of the final stage of the interconnection. 




■>■/-... 




5 i JW~ t ' 






r 


,f**' - ■* ff 




"w0 : " 








)■ iHy ' f^7~-^k 




■ iimB \ J 




g^M 








EAST-WEST SYSTEM INTERCONNECTION — A 45-ton hydraulic crane with a boom 
and jib that can be extended to well over 100 feet is used for the erection of 
towers in some of the rugged country traversed by the tie-line. 



74 Planning, Engineering, and Construction 

A new 230-kv transmission line between Lakeview Generating Station and 
Richview Transformer Station was completed and placed in service to carry power 
generated by Units 7 and 8 at the generating station. The line includes approxi- 
mately one and three-quarter miles of overhead conductor strung on bridge towers, 
two parallel underground cable sections about five-eighths of a mile long, laid 
under the Queen Elizabeth Way and through a residential area, and about seven 
and a half miles of overhead conductor strung on modified single-circuit towers. 

The other significant additions to the 230-kv system during the year were a 
36.5-mile double-circuit line from Lambton Generating Station to Chatham 
Switching Station, and a 30-mile double-circuit line from Muskoka Transformer 
Station to Coopers Falls Junction. 

A number of short lengths of 115-kv line were completed at various points, 
and about 50 miles of 115-kv line between Barrett Chute Generating Station 
and South March Transformer Station were re-tensioned to permit the line to carry 
a higher load. 

Three sections of 115-kv oil-filled underground cable circuits were placed in 
service. Two of these are in parallel, between Hamilton-Stirton Transformer 
Station and Hamilton-Elgin Transformer Station, a distance of 2.3 miles. The 
third is between Toronto-Duplex Transformer Station and Roehampton Junction, 
a distance of three-quarters of a mile. 

A total of 97.5 miles of new subtransmission line (27.6-kv or 44-kv), 28 
new distributing stations, including newly constructed replacement stations, and 
one new regulating station were also placed in service during the year. 



SECTION V 



RESEARCH AND TESTING ACTIVITIES 



THE Commission's research and testing activities, necessary to support the 
design, construction, and effective operation of a large and rapidly expanding 
power system, involve many challenging problems. The products and services 
offered by industry provide important contributions to the solution of these 
problems. Some necessary products and services, however, are initially not avail- 
able, perhaps because they seem insufficiently profitable, perhaps because industry 
lacks either the knowledge of requirements or the staff and facilities needed for 
their development without assistance from the Commission. Co-operative research 
and development in these areas have proven to be advantageous to both parties. 
Much of this work involves the investigation of new materials, designs, and tech- 
niques, and their modification and application to meet Ontario Hydro's particular 
requirements. 

The extent and variety of the Commission's applied research program are 
indicated by the brief outlines of some activities that follow. The program engages 
the concentrated attention of a staff of about 300, supported by the first-class 
facilities at the Ontario Hydro W. P. Dobson Research Laboratory. Close liaison 
is maintained with other research organizations, technical societies, and universities 
in order to ensure that the latest information is continuously available. Reports 
in greater detail on many of the subjects outlined here are published in the form 
of technical papers or in the Ontario Hydro Research Quarterly. 

75 



70 



Research and Testing Activities 

Aids to Design and Development 



New Self-Damping Conductor for Control of Aeolian Vibration 

Conventional transmission-line conductors, which consist of layers of round 
aluminum wires over a core of round steel wires, provide very little damping of 
vibration internally. For this reason, external vibration dampers must be installed 
to prevent failure due to fatigue from the effects of low-amplitude, high-frequency, 
aeolian vibration, which is caused by gentle winds. In fact, even with the best 
available dampers installed, the aeolian vibration that occurs frequently at certain 
locations limits conductor tensions to values that are considerably lower than 
those that otherwise could be used economically. 

Research and development carried out jointly by the Commission and the 
Aluminum Company of Canada over a period of several years have led to the 
design of a new type of conductor with much better internal damping character- 
istics. This conductor has the same general construction as the conventional steel- 
reinforced aluminum conductor, but the aluminum wires are sector-shaped rather 
than circular in cross-section, and there is a clearance between the steel core and 
the first layer of aluminum wires, and between each pair of successive layers. 

The much higher level of internal damping provided by the new conductor 
arises primarily from the dissipation of vibrational energy that results from 
repeated impacts between the core and the first layer of wires and between 
adjacent layers of wires. Tests, made under conditions which included those 
typically encountered in service and conductor tensions somewhat higher than 
those currently applied, show that this higher level of damping is sufficient to limit 
aeolian vibration to a level considerably below that which the conductor could 
withstand indefinitely without damage. 




TEST SPAN FOR INSULATOR STUDIES — 
This facility, recently erected outside the 
Commission's high-voltage laboratory, in- 
cludes provision for recording surface 
leakage currents, and for lowering the 
test pieces for periodic inspection. The 
vertical pieces connecting the two upper 
conductors are inter-phase ties, proposed 
for use as a means of preventing the 
galloping of conductors during ice and 
wind storms. 



Aids to Design and Development 

Studies of High- Voltage-Line Insulators 



77 



Although the materials and characteristics of insulators for transmission lines 
have been under investigation for many years, resultant changes in design have 
led to few significant improvements in performance. Now, however, new materials 
for some insulator applications, and changes 
that will significantly improve the performance 
of insulators made from the more conventional 
materials, appear possible and necessary. 

Ontario Hydro has requirements for high- 
voltage insulators with improved characteris- 
tics for special applications such as service 
in polluted atmospheres and use as inter-phase 
ties to control conductor galloping. To assist 
the insulator industry in meeting these require- 
ments, work was begun on several related lines 
of investigation. 

The aim of the current studies is to deter- 
mine the effectiveness of semi-conducting sur- 
face glazes in stabilizing voltage distribution 
along strings of insulators when they become 
wet and dirty in service. To facilitate this work, 
a fog chamber has been installed in the high- 
voltage laboratory. The photograph on the fol- 
lowing page, taken inside this chamber, shows 
a string of insulators near the point of electrical 
breakdown during a study of contamination 
phenomena. 

Insulator-contamination monitors are be- 
ing developed for use in field evaluations of 
various insulators, and of the effects of various 
pollutants. One of the several available designs 
for these relatively simple devices is now being 
tried to determine the degree of contamination 
at which insulator washing is required. 




SELF-DAMPING CONDUCTOR— Developed 
jointly by Ontario Hydro and the Alu- 
minum Company of Canada, this new 
conductor provides improved control of 
aeolian vibration without the use of 
external vibration dampers. 



. 



New insulating materials for outdoor use are continually evaluated at the 
laboratory by electrical stressing of test pieces under both natural and artificial 
weather conditions. A test span has been erected outside the high-voltage labora- 
tory to permit continuous full-scale outdoor testing. This new facility will be used 
to investigate new materials, such as glass-reinforced plastics, and to provide data 
that might permit the up-rating of existing lines and the creation of new compact 
designs for high-voltage and extra-high-voltage lines suitable for crowded rights 
of way. 



78 



Research and Testing Activities 



Loss of Soil Strength Due to Sampling 

Decisions as to the suitability of a particular piece of land for use as a site 
for a generating station or a transformer station often depend largely on shear- 
strength values for the soil, which are usually determined in the laboratory from 
compression tests performed on samples obtained from various depths. In many 
instances, however, the laboratory-measured strength proves to be much lower 
than the true in-place strength. A study was made therefore to determine the 
causes of this discrepancy and the means of correcting for it. 

For Lambton Generating 
Station, where the soil over- 
burden is unusually deep, soil 
strengths measured in the la- 
boratory with conventional 
tests on samples removed from 
the site were generally much 
smaller than the strengths 
measured with the soil in 
place, using a field vane. The 
loss of strength can be at- 
tributed to the mechanical dis- 
turbance of sampling and 
handling and also to the stress 
relief that occurs when a 
sample of soil is removed from 
the ground. Since the soils at 
this site and in many parts of 
southern Ontario are relatively 
insensitive to mechanical dis- 
turbance, the loss of strength 
was believed to be related to 
the effects of stress relief. 

When a sample of clay is 
subjected to stress relief, a 
"suction" develops in the 
sample. If this suction is 
equivalent to the in-place 
stresses, measurements will 
indicate the correct strength value. This seldom results since the suction tends to 
dissipate in handling, shipping, and storage. Measurements made at the laboratory 
on samples removed from the Lambton site showed that the remaining suction was 
quite small. 

In special tests, stresses equal to those existing in the soil in place were applied 
to soil samples. These stresses were anisotropic, the vertical stress being greater 
than the horizontal stress. Samples tested in this manner yielded correct strength 
values. It was found also that if the theoretical suction pressure was applied to 




INSULATOR STRING UNDER TEST IN FOG CHAMBER 



Aids to Design and Development 79 

the sample as a positive external isotropic stress, a correct strength value was 
obtained. These studies showed that a correction can be made to conventional 
strength tests, based on simple plasticity properties. The techniques now permit 
the strength of clay in relatively deep deposits to be properly appraised by the 
use of conventional laboratory equipment. 

Studies of Roofing Materials 

Built-up systems for protecting flat and low-pitch roofs against weather must 
be waterproof, easy to apply, and durable, and they should provide good heat 
insulation. Systems in use range from the long-established build-up of coal-tar 
pitch or asphalt on felt, to the newer and more complex organic polymers applied 
in sheet or liquid form. Because of wide variations in the properties and quality 
of products now available commercially, a study was made to aid in the selection 
of the optimum system for a given class of application. A laboratory evaluation 
included not only roof membrane coatings such as coal tar, asphalt, butyl rubber, 
neoprene-hypalon, and silicone, but also constituents such as vapour barriers and 
felts. In a concurrent study, repair materials and procedures were reviewed, and 
a manual was prepared as a guide to the maintenance and repair of built-up 
roofs. 

As a continuation of the work, simulated roof decks were constructed for 
evaluating those systems in each class which the laboratory studies showed to be 
superior. In half-yearly observations of the effects of natural weathering of the 
specimens, the types and frequency of breakdown will be noted, and possible 
means of repair will be appraised as to facility and cost. 

Fatigue Tests of Simulated Heat-Exchanger Tubesheet Joints 

Heat exchangers in nuclear-electric stations, like many other engineering 
structures or items of equipment, will experience one complete cycle of tempera- 
ture and pressure, and one cycle of the resulting stresses each time the unit is 
started up and shut down. Such cycles are expected to occur only a few hundred 
times during the service life of the unit. Fatigue data for this low range of load 
cycles are available for the basic engineering materials, but unusual designs or 
manufacturing procedures require special tests to provide the specific data neces- 
sary for the development of an economical but adequate design. 

To provide data needed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited in the develop- 
ment and selection of an economical design for tubesheets in heat exchangers 
such as those for Pickering Generating Station, the Commission built a special 
40,000-pound-capacity fatigue-test machine. With this machine, specimens de- 
signed for evaluating various aspects of heat-exchanger tube-to-tubesheet joints 
were cyclically loaded in equal tension and compression to produce fatigue failure 
in from 10 to 10,000 cycles. 

The principal findings were that the nickel and monel tubesheet overlay 
slightly increases the fatigue strength of the tubesheet at stresses above 40,000 psi, 
but slightly reduces it at lower stresses; that small lack-of-fusion defects in the 



so 



Research and Testing Activities 



overlay, either repaired or unrepaired, have no significant effects; that the expan- 
sion of tubes into the tubesheet holes by rolling has no significant effect; and that 
the circumferentially welded joint between tube and tubesheet slightly increases 
the fatigue strength of the tubesheet. 

Aids to System Operation 
Advances in System Protection 

Power-system protection and control can be expected to benefit considerably 
from the electronic developments that are resulting from the requirements of 
space-exploration and computer technology. As an example, much of this new 
technology, which is based on solid-state devices, is being applied in the extensive 
microwave system that is being installed for the Commission in southern Ontario. 
Manufacturers are also offering protective-relay assemblies for power systems, 
based on similar techniques. Since there is very little background experience 
regarding the performance on power systems of this type of equipment, an exten- 
sive evaluation of electronic protective relays was performed, and this work is 
being continued. The functional principles of the new equipment, both for pro- 
tective relaying and for communications, were examined. 

Concurrently with studies on the application of new types of commercial equip- 
ment, a development program was begun relating to protection systems as an 
entity. These studies include an examination of the functions of the protection, 




FATIGUE TESTING MACHINE — Capable of applying 
cyclic loads of up to 40,000 pounds in tension and 
compression, this specially built machine was used 
in tests that provided fatigue data needed for the 
design of heat-exchangers such as those to be in- 
stalled at Pickering Generating Station. 



Aids to System Operation 



81 



from the input devices to the breaker trip circuits. The program is at present 
concerned primarily with line protection. It includes design developments in the 
following areas: 

Alternative devices to current transformers and potential transformers, 

based on the particular requirements of solid-state electronic protective 

relays; 

New electronic fault-detecting relays; 

Over-all protective-relay logic based on integrated-circuit techniques; 

Communication channels to suit the specific requirements of the over-all 

scheme. 

Being of solid-state 
type, the new equipment 
functions at low power and 
voltage. Therefore it is sus- 
ceptible to damage due to 
transients, although it must 
function in close proximity 
to circuits operating at 
hundreds of kilovolts and 
carrying thousands of am- 
peres. Work is under way 
on the design of wiring ar- 
rangements which would 
limit the voltage levels ap- 
plied to the devices in this 
relatively adverse environ- 
ment. This is expected to 
result in satisfactory per- 
formance of the new classes 
of electronic devices as they 




PROTECTIVE RELAY UNDER TEST 



become more extensively applied. 



Being of solid-state type, the new equipment functions at low power and 
voltage. Therefore it is susceptible to damage due to transients, although it must 
function in close proximity to circuits operating at hundreds of kilovolts and 
carrying thousands of amperes. Work is under way on the design of wiring ar- 
rangements which would limit the voltage levels applied to the devices in this 
relatively adverse environment. This is expected to result in satisfactory perform- 
ance of the new classes of electronic devices as they become more extensively 
applied. 



Design and Testing of New Circuit-Breaker 

The timed high-speed vacuum circuit-breaker, described briefly in the 1967 
Annual Report, has been developed to the stage of interrupting-capability tests. 
The design of this circuit-breaker is based on two main principles. First, the 
opening stroke is timed to begin a few hundred microseconds before the fault 
current zero in order to minimize arcing and resultant contact damage. Second, 



82 



Research and Testing Activities 




OPERATIONS SEQUENCE ANALYZER — This device is 
being specially designed and built to serve as an aid to 
the operation of Nanticoke Generating Station, now under 
construction. It will be capable of monitoring up to 1,200 
relay points at the station and recording all operations 
on these points in sequence. For important events, the 
analyzer will prepare an immediate summary of relay 
operations. This will be displayed for each of the unit 
operators, thus providing them with valuable assistance 
in making prompt decisions with respect to subsequent 
control operations. 
The analyzer will make extensive use of integrated cir- 
cuits and small magnetic cores, and will use digital multi- 
plexing to avoid requirements for individual wiring con- 
nections to each relay point. 



the contacts are accelerated very rapidly in a high vacuum in order to withstand 
the recovery voltage. Preliminary tests have confirmed the validity of these prin- 
ciples. Continuing interrupting trials with synthetic test circuits in the laboratory are 
intended to determine the capabilities of the chosen frame size, to test improve- 
ments still being made in the high-speed mechanism, and hence to establish the 
basis of a manufacturing design. 

Frequency-Trend Relays Applied to the Power System 

Techniques in solid-state electronics continue to be applied for a variety of, 
uses in the power system. The frequency-trend relay, developed by the Com- 
mission's Research Division for automatic load shedding during major systei 
disturbances, is an example. Some seventy of these devices, which make extensive 
use of integrated circuits to detect an imbalance between generating capacity an( 
load, have been installed on the system. Under control of these relays, up to 5( 
per cent of the southern Ontario load on the system can now be rejected auto- 
matically. 



Miscellaneous Studies and Developments 

Experimental Electric Radiant Ceiling-Heating Installation 

In co-operation with the Ontario Electrical League and the National Houst 
Builders' Association (NHBA), a modified dry-wall sandwich ceiling-cable heating 
system was installed in an experimental house in Kitchener. The system differ; 



PROTECTION AGAINST LIGHTNING AND 
SURGES — Efforts to minimize the results of 
lightning and other voltage surges on the 
power system continue to make progress. In- 
vestigations of the occurrence and effects of 
lightning strokes have been aided by helicopter 
observation of transmission lines and by the 
improvement of computer techniques for the 
analysis of automatically recorded data. A re- 
cently developed device that gives an alarm 
on the approach of lightning storms has already 
provided valuable protection to construction 
workers at Pickering Generating Station, where 
high cranes are ready targets for lightning 
strokes. Other new developments in protection 
against lightning include some novel conforma- 
tions for double-circuit transmission lines, and 
a new parallel-pipe gap combined with a con- 
ventional point-to-point rod-gap for the pro- 
tection of stations. The latter is shown under 
test at the right. 




from the commonly used dry-wall sandwich in that the filler material normally 
i applied to fill the space between the two layers of gypsum board is omitted. This 
modification is intended to reduce the cost of dry-wall ceiling-cable installations, 
i and thereby increase their popularity with builders in comparison with gypsum 
plaster installations. The latter are more subject to poor workmanship, and 
resultant cracking which is worsened by the variations in temperature that occur 
with ceiling-cable heating. The experimental installation will provide information 
on operating temperatures within the sandwich, and thus permit the probable 
service life of the system to be estimated. 

Flexible Finish for Repair of Cracked Cable-Heated Ceilings 

Plaster surfaces tend to crack on aging, particularly where plaster work is 
below standard. The surfaces normally are repaired by filling the opened cracks 
: with a plaster joint filler, and then covering the filled cracks with a decorative 
coating material. Where space heating is by electric cables embedded in the 
ceiling plaster, thermal stressing caused by the substantial temperature changes 
can contribute to the cracking. Ceiling cracks then tend to close when the temper- 
ature rises and to open when the temperature drops. Conventional coatings do 
not have sufficient elasticity to expand and contract with the opening and closing 
of the cracks, and the coating, therefore, breaks and leaves the cracks exposed. 

Some five years ago, a coating composition was developed which has sufficient 
elasticity to maintain a covering for the cracks despite temperature changes in 



84 



Research and Testing Activities 



the surface. By continued research into the properties of the coating, a single 
latex-type material has now been developed which replaces the previous primer 
and finish system. A decorative film with a dry thickness of 10 mils can be applied 
in two coats. After application to the heated ceiling surface, the coating is cured 
by the relatively high degree of heat provided by the embedded electric heating 
cables. The heat causes self cross-linking of the coating polymer thus forming 
an elastic film with remarkable elongation and tensile-strength characteristics. 
Over the past four years, tests of the coating repair system in structures built for 
heating by ceiling cable have provided highly satisfactory results. 

For protective coatings, the requirement for development of a heat-cured film 
of high elasticity on a plaster surface and the formula and properties of the 
coating were sufficiently unusual and original to warrant application for a patent, 
and registration of the trade name, "Plyant". 



Monitoring and Control of Asbestos Dust Levels in 
Thermal-Electric Generating Stations 

In nuclear-electric and coal-fired generating stations, spray-applied asbestos 
fibre has been used increasingly to supplement premoulded pipe and block insula- 
tion as thermal insulation for boilers, turbines, and auxiliary equipment operating 

at high temperatures. Fol- 
lowing the lead of the Cen- 
tral Electricity Generating 
Board of Great Britain, On- 
tario Hydro has made mea- 
surements which show that 
^^k I ^^Ih^. tne concentrations of air- 

J? a ^mf- ^^Sfc| t borne asbestos dust during 

jflj jjjr /^^^ ^^ ^^^ j, the application and removal 

/ in^^Hfl ^^Br °^ ^ s mater ^ a ^ mav De high 

, gd ^^ enough to present a respira- 

tory health hazard. In ex- 
tensive studies to find 
means of removing this haz- 
ard, techniques were de- 
veloped for the routine monitoring of asbestos dust concentrations at each work 
location, and personnel were trained in the collection, counting, and identification of 
the dust. Criteria were established for interpreting these data and for reducing the 
large number of measurements to a form indicative of the cumulative hazard to 
the health of workers at the various work locations. Administrative systems were 
devised for relating the data obtained to the detailed work practices developed 
to minimize the amount of dust generated during work with products containing 
asbestos. 

Parallel programs were begun with the purposes of evaluating substitute 
materials, and co-operating with industry in the development of asbestos-reduced 
and asbestos-free products. Test equipment and laboratory procedures were 
developed to rate the thermal-mechanical-vibration stability of these products and 




SAMPLES OF TYPICAL FAILURES IN BOILER TUBES — Small 
pieces have been removed from each for metallographic exam- 
ination. 









Miscellaneous Studies and Developments 85 

their equivalence to current products. The work led to acceptance of an asbestos- 
free block insulation developed for non-load conditions on boiler walls. Significant 
progress was made in the development and evaluation of asbestos-free spray- 
applied systems and of preformed pipe and block insulations for load-bearing 
applications. 

Steam-Plant Boiler-Tube Failures 

In coal-fired generating stations, a major cause of outages is failure of steel 
boiler tubes. Over the years Ontario Hydro has examined many such tubes 
metallographically to identify the causes of failures. Excluding those resulting 
from mechanical action such as differential thermal expansion, the failures ex- 
amined may be classified as being due to the following causes in order of frequency 
of occurrence : 

Defective material in which laminations or gross slag inclusions give 
rise to brittle fractures (Some brittle fractures, however, result from 
micro-cracking in the internal surface, caused by hydrogen attack); 
Incomplete or faulty welds; 

Erosion caused by the impingement of soot from faulty soot-blowers; 

Overheating characterized by local bulging and splitting; 

Internal corrosion. 

Correlation of contributing causes with failure data, although incomplete, 
shows that failures associated with faulty material, design, or fabrication begin to 
occur in the comparatively early period of operation. Improved specifications for 
thermal tubing have largely eliminated material defects in the boiler tubes of the 
more recently installed units. The failures caused by corrosion, and the side 
effects of corrosion, often have their origin in unusual flow conditions or imperfect 
chemical control of the boiler water. 

Methods for determining tube conditions by a non-destructive test are being 
sought to permit tube repair work to be scheduled for regular shut-down periods. 
In the past, ultrasonic testing techniques have been applied successfully for 
locating deep corrosion pits in accessible critical areas. Similar techniques are now 
being studied as a means of locating zones of micro-cracking in hydrogen-damaged 
tubes. 

Protective Coatings for Immersed Steel Structures 

In studies which began 15 years ago, some 120 different protective-coating 
systems of various generic types applied to six-foot steel panels have been sus- 
pended from corrosion racks in the forebay at Chats Falls Generating Station. This 
has been done to subject the samples to a simulation of the environment to which 
generating station control gates and trash-racks are normally exposed. The lower 
part of each coated panel is subjected to continuous immersion, the middle part, 
to intermittent splash, and the top part, to the atmosphere. Fifty-six of the 
protective-coating systems have been applied also to five-foot angle-steel panels, 



86 Research and Testing Activities 

and these have been exposed in the Niagara River at the Toronto Power Generat- 
ing Station, with the upper part of the panels subjected to the abrasive action 
of river ice. 

After exposure periods ranging up to the full 15 years, three coating systems, 
based on vinyl, coal-tar epoxy, and neoprene have continued to provide superior 
protection for blast-cleaned steel. Good protective properties have been demon- 
strated by eight other systems. 

All coating systems exposed to river ice were moderately to heavily abraded 
within from two to four years after exposure. Two types of coatings, namely 
coal-tar epoxy and sand-filled epoxy, have proved to be the most resistant to 
abrasion by ice. 

Improved Hydraulic Fluids 

The shear stability and anti-wear properties, under high rates of shear, of 
some newly developed low-temperature hydraulic fluids and also conventional 
hydraulic fluids, were determined in laboratory tests. For safe and dependable 
operation of aerial man lifts and other hydraulically operated equipment, these 
fluids must have good low-temperature viscosity characteristics to permit easy 
movement of rubbing parts at sub-zero temperatures, and good anti-wear properties 
to prevent excessive wear of such parts, particularly at high operating tempera- 
tures. Relatively stable viscosities over a wide range of operating temperatures 
are obtained by the addition of long-chain polymers, known as viscosity-index 
improvers, to low-viscosity, low-pour-point base oils, but such oils may be subject 
to breakdown under, shear. Several of the oils tested, however, performed well, 
both in the laboratory and in field trials. These oils are now used in most Ontario 
Hydro hydraulic equipment that must operate under adverse winter conditions. 



SECTION VI 



STAFF RELATIONS 



IT WAS a year of increasing uncertainty and slowly mounting tension in labour 
relations as negotiations were opened successively, beginning in the spring of 
1968, for the renewal of separate collective agreements covering all the Com- 
mission's employees represented by the present sixteen recognized bargaining 
agencies. 

By the end of the year no new agreements had been negotiated, and pro- 
cedures with the Ontario Hydro Employees Union (CLC) and the Canadian 
Union of Operating Engineers (CLC) were in various stages of conciliation. 
Differences with the construction craft unions in the Allied Construction Council 
and four associated unions remained unresolved at the end of the year. 

With the failure of conciliation procedures to achieve an agreement, the 
Employees Union on February 3 embarked on a series of rotating strikes directed 
specifically towards the harassment of management. Supervisory staff with a 
remarkable display of determination, forbearance, and devotion to duty main- 
tained service continuity without major inconvenience to the Commission's cus- 
tomers until the strike was eventually settled on March 10. Settlement with the 
Canadian Union of Operating Engineers was also reached later in March. 

During the year the CUOE applied to the Ontario Labour Relations Board 
for certification to represent employees at Lakeview Generating Station, thus 

87 



88 Staff Relations 

seeking to withdraw this sub-unit from the Commission-wide industrial unit repre- 
sented by the Canadian Union of Public Employees. The Hamilton Local of the 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, in a similar bid to 
represent the carpenters at Nanticoke Generating Station, sought to withdraw this 
sub-unit from the province-wide craft unit of carpenters in the Commission's 
construction forces, which is now represented by the International. The Ontario 
Labour Relations Board dismissed the latter application, and a Board examiner 
is now reviewing the application of the Canadian Union of Operating Engineers. 

The Commission co-operated in, and made some contribution towards, federal 
and provincial studies in labour relations problems which were subsequently 
published in the Goldenberg Centennial Canadian Construction Association 
Report and the Report of the late Justice Ivan C. Rand. 

In conjunction with representatives of the unions, the Commission has been 
active in joint committee work directed towards resolving problems of common 
concern, and defining new approaches to changing work conditions. Supervisory 
training programs and guidance in labour relations activities have been provided 
to a number of municipal utilities through co-operative arrangements with the 
OMEA and AMEU. 

Accident Prevention 

During 1968 there was a more than 100 per cent increase in the number 
of man-hours spent on construction as compared with 1967, in which there 
was a long construction strike. Construction work, which is relatively more 
hazardous than other types of Commission activity, therefore represented 36 
per cent of the total man-hours worked by Commission employees in 1968, 
as compared with 22.7 per cent in 1967. The construction forces did in fact 
improve their performance record by reducing the frequency rate of lost-time 
accidents per million man-hours worked by approximately 4 per cent, and other 
major groups generally maintained their earlier excellent performance. The 
increased statistical weight of the construction segment, however, raised the over- 
all frequency rate for the Commission as a whole from 9 to 1 1 per million man- 
hours worked. 

The number of fatal accidents was reduced from the former low of 3 to 1 
in 1968, leaving the only possible target for 1969 a 100 per cent improvement. 
This was, of course, a major factor in reducing the severity rate per million man- 
hours worked to 900, which is the lowest recorded since this form of measurement 
was instituted by the Commission. The average over the preceding five years was 
1,240. 

Medical Services 

In the absence of any major epidemic, the general health of employees 
was good. On the other hand, programmed medical activity has been subject 
to considerable expansion with the increasing number and growing complexity 
of environmental health hazards, in particular those associated with the larger 
thermal-electric stations, both fossil-fuel and nuclear. 






Staff Statistics 



K9 



Noise, lasers, and problems in the toxicity and handling of solvents, thinners, 
insecticides, and pesticides have been given special attention. Notable progress 
was made in studies for the control of asbestosis and air pollution. The Com- 
mission is promoting the ultimate replacement of asbestos by a less hazardous 
insulating material. 

Training in radiation protection took on increasing importance with the 
need for training employees to operate and maintain nuclear stations, not only 
on the Commission's systems but in Quebec and India as well. Liaison with Atomic 
Energy of Canada Limited, the Compensation Board, local medical and public 
health authorities, and specialists at Toronto General Hospital was established 
in devising procedures for the medical care of employees in the unlikely event 
of critical exposure to radiation. 



COMMUNITY SWIMMING POOL AT ABIT- 
IBI CANYON— Abitibi Canyon Generating 
Station is located approximately 320 miles 
to the north of North Bay, and the edu- 
cational, social, and recreational needs of 
an isolated community of approximately 
400 persons must be accommodated by 
local facilities. 

A new community centre was opened by 
the Commission in 1968. In addition to 
public services of various kinds, it offers 
space and equipment for social functions, 
provides curling facilities comparable with 
the best in northern Ontario, and includes 
a swimming pool that is extensively used 
and appreciated by all members of the 
community, both young and old. 




Staff Statistics 

In rising to 19,550 in 1968, the average number of employees reached its 
highest level since 1957, the average number of regular employees at 13,815 
its highest level since 1958. These figures reflect not only the requirements of a 
greatly expanded construction program, but also the necessity to engage and train 






90 Staff Relations 

staff for new thermal-electric and nuclear-electric generating stations well in 
advance of their initial operation. 

Conference and Development Centre 

On January 28, 1968, the Commission's new Conference and Development 
Centre at Orangeville was opened. It is regarded as a resource available to all 
units in Ontario Hydro for the purpose of meeting the needs of employee training 
in accordance with modern techniques and concepts. 

Located on 200 acres of hilly and well-wooded land in the Hockley Valley, 
it offers an attractive setting of seclusion and privacy, combined with convenience 
of access. Full advantage has been taken of the natural terrain to distribute a 
variety of activities at different levels in the buildings, and in conveniently 
segregated areas of the property. 

Six connected buildings arranged in a multi-level pattern comprise the 
main complex. In addition to its attractive appearance and functional accom- 
modation for a good learning climate, this structure provides an acceptable level 
of comfort and privacy for study and rest in the dormitory quarters, as well as 
facilities for relaxation and recreation to meet the needs of the fairly large numbers 
of people likely to be in attendance. The arrangements will permit maximum 
flexibility in meeting the diverse needs of a wide range of the employee population. 
Several quite different kinds of activity may be going on simultaneously without 
serious interference among the groups engaged. A separate structure removed 
from the main building includes not only classroom and workshop areas suitable 
for the instruction of various trade groups, but also a pole barn where training in 
overhead and underground line maintenance work can be carried on. 

While courses will be given at the centre, it is not primarily a course- 
giving institute. It is intended to meet the needs of trade and technical training, 
supervisory and management courses and seminars, and to provide facilities for 
other types of conferences and business meetings. 

Except for the summer-vacation period, when the operating load at the 
centre was only 50 to 60 per cent of capacity, demands on accommodation 
were normally well in excess of capacity. During the eleven months of operation, 
over 2,300 members of the staff participated in some form of programmed train- 
ing, and another 1,300 attended conferences or business meetings, perhaps only 
for the day. 

By using supplementary accommodation in neighbouring motels, and by 
scheduling some training in other facilities, somewhat more than 90 per cent 
of the requests for use of the centre were met. It was apparent, however, 
that future demands would far outrun the present capacity of the centre, and 
consideration was given to immediate plans for its extension. 



Pension and Insurance Fund 
THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO 



91 



PENSION AND INSURANCE FUND 

STATEMENT OF ASSETS 
as at December 31, 1968 



Investments 

Bonds and stocks — 

Federal and Provincial government and government-guaranteed bonds (par 

value $150,251,000) 

Corporation bonds (par value $35,555,000) 

Stocks 

Total bonds and stocks (approximate market value $194,589,000) 

First mortgages on real estate 

Real property leased to others 

Total investments 

Cash 

Accrued interest 

Due from stockbrokers — secured by stocks sold 

Receivable from The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 

Due to stockbrokers 



147,019,169 
35,469,345 
37,122,777 

219,611,291 

18,916,210 
382,050 

238,909,551 

562,671 
2,619,417 

251,983 
9,131,483 

251,475,105 

584,989 

250,890,116 



NOTES 

1. The triennial actuarial valuation of the pension plan was made as at December 31, 1967, in compliance 
with the requirements of The Pension Benefits Act 1965. This valuation indicated that the plan had an 
unfunded liability of approximately $14,600,000. Current contributions include an amount sufficient to 
recover this deficiency within the period of time required by The Pension Benefits Act 1965. 

2. In the above statement, bonds are included at amortized cost, stocks at cost, first mortgages on real 
estate at balance of principal outstanding, and real property at cost less amortization. 



AUDITORS' REPORT 

We have examined the statement of assets of The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario Pension 
and Insurance Fund as at December 31, 1968. Our examination included a general review of the accounting 
procedures and such tests of accounting records and other supporting evidence as we considered necessary 
in the circumstances. 

In our opinion the accompanying statement presents fairly the assets of the fund as at December 31, 1968. 
T CLARKSON, GORDON & CO. 

loronto, Canada, Chartered Accountants 

May 2, 1969. 



APPENDIX I - OPERATIONS 



The table of power resources and requirements on pages 96 and 97 gives for 
system and in total the primary peak requirements for the month of December, 
and the dependable capacity of the Commission's resources at that time. A separate 
table on the two preceding pages gives the December dependable capacity and 
maximum output of the major Commission-owned stations and the major sources 
of purchased power. In any comparison of total requirements and resources, al- 
lowance should be made for that part of total requirements which may be inter- 
rupted over the peak period in accordance with contract terms accepted by the 
customer. In 1968 this was in the order of 315 megawatts. 



The dependable capacity of a hydro-electric generating station is the estimated 
output which an analysis of historical stream-flow conditions indicates the station 
is capable of producing 98 per cent of the time. It can be expected to exceed this 
output in 49 out of 50 years. Since the stations so rated are distributed on many 
widely separated watersheds, and since all would not be simultaneously affected 
by low stream flows, the total hydro-electric generating capacity of the system is 
estimated to be greater than the sum of the various station capacities by an allow- 
ance for this diversity. The dependable peak capacity of a thermal-electric station 
is the net output of its fully commissioned units, but units in a fairly advanced 
stage of commissioning are occasionally included at a conservatively estimated 
proportion of their rated capacity. In any event, the margin of reserve capacity is 
conservatively measured both in the calculation of requirements and in the cal- 
culation of capacity. 

Statistics on peak loads and capacities are given in the Report in kilowatts, 
but they may be conveniently converted to horsepower on the basis that one horse- 
power is equivalent to approximately 0.746 kilowatts. 

The Analysis of Energy Sales on pages 98 and 99 shows how the kilowatt-hours 
made available by the Commission and the associated municipal utilities were 
distributed to the various classes of ultimate customers or to interconnected sys- 
tems. The table on Disposal of Energy by the Commission reconciles these figures 
with system primary energy requirements and the total energy generated and 
purchased by the Commission. 

93 



94 



Appendix I — Operations 
THE COMMISSION'S POWER RESOURCES— 1968 



East System 
River 



Hydro-Electric Generating Stations 



Niagara J Sir Adam Beck - Niagara No. 1 

Sir Adam Beck - Niagara No. 2 

Pumping-Generating Station , 

**Ontario Power 

**Toronto Power 

Welland Canal DeCew Falls No. 1 

DeCew Falls No. 2 

Ajustment to Niagara River stations to compensate 
for use of water by Ontario Hydro rather than by 

another producer 

St. Lawrence Robert H. Saunders - St. Lawrence 

Ottawa Des Joachims 

Otto Holden 

Chenaux 

Chats Falls (Ontario half) 

Madawaska Mountain Chute 

Barrett Chute 

Stewartville 

Abitibi jAbitibi Canyon 

Otter Rapids 

Mississagi George W. Rayner 

Red Rock Falls 

Mattagami Kipling 

Little Long 

Harmon 

Various Other hydro-electric generating stations 

Diversity - Adjustment due to difference between the 
calculation of capacity on an individual plant basis and for the 
system as a whole 

Total hydro-electric - East System 



Location 

Windsor 
Toronto 

Rolphton 
Various 



Thermal-Electric Generating Stations 

J. Clark Keith 

Lakeview 

Richard L. Hearn 

Nuclear Power Demonstration . . . 
Combustion turbines 

Total thermal-electric - East System 

Total generated - East System 



Dependable 
Capacity* 



kw 



420,000 

1,287,000 

108,000 



31,000 
124,000 



75,000 
817,000 
371,000 
193,000 
115,000 

77,000 
165,000 
159,000 

65,000 
226,000 
177,000 

46,000 

40,000 
142,000 
125,000 
125,000 
150,600 



42,400 



4,931,000 



255,000 
2,205,000 
1,193,000 

321,000 



3,974,000 



Maximum 
Output* 



8,905,000 



kw 



426,000 
1,357,000 
92,000 
98,000 
81,000 
32,100 

137,000 



870,000 
381,000 
218,000 
115,500 

87,000 
166,000 
168,000 

64,500 
211,000 
175,000 

47,180 

40,320 
136,000 
130,000 
138,500 
155,270 



247,500 

2,190,000 

1,177,500 

25,400 

318,800 



Annual Energy 
Output (Net)f 



kwh 



2,970,014,440 
9,005,915,000 
129,109,700 
265,436,000 
105,305,145 
135,588,480 
979,113,100 



6,725,954 
2,156,753 
1,112,685 
701,819 
521,296 
239,973 
170,116 
205,169 
1,473,852 
813,072 
333,041 
225,867 
718,415 
678,052 
751,057 
884,042 



,000 
,000 
,800 
,000 
,000 
,200 
,800 
,500 
,100 
,000 
,680 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,000 
,780 



31,043,429,325 



1,050,249,300 

8,535,776,000 

5,989,381,300 

86,893,000 

86,239,800 



15,748,539,400 






46,791,968,725 






Capacity and Output of Resources 
THE COMMISSION'S POWER RESOURCES— 1968 



95 



East System - Continued 

Sources of Purchased Power 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - Douglas Point 

Detroit Edison Company 

{Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation 

♦♦Canadian Niagara Power Company 

Power Authority of the State of New York 

{Quebec Hydro-Electric Commission 

Maclaren Quebec Power Company 

Ottawa Valley Power Company 

JAbitibi Paper Company Limited 

Great Lakes Power Corporation Limited 

Miscellaneous (relatively small suppliers) 



Total purchased - East System 



West System 
River 

Nipigon 



English 

Kaministikwia 
Winnipeg 
Aguasabon 
Various 



Hydro-Electric Generating Stations 

Pine Portage 

Cameron Falls 

Alexander 

Caribou Falls 

Manitou Falls 

Silver Falls 

Whitedog Falls 

Aguasabon 

Other hydro-electric generating stations 



Diversity — Adjustment due to difference between the 
calculation of capacity on an individual plant basis and for the 
system as a whole 

Total hydro-electric — West System 



Location Thermal-Electric Generating Stations 

Fort William Thunder Bay 

Various Combustion turbines and diesel-electric 
Total generated - West System 



Sources of Purchased Power 

Manitoba Hydro-Electric Board - 

Ontario Minnesota Pulp and Paper Company Limited - 

Total purchased - West System 

Total generated 

Total purchased 

Total generated and purchased 



Dependable 
Capacity* 



kw 



200,000 



348,000 
93,000 
77,000 

4,100 
1,500 



723,600 



115,200 
76,400 
62,000 
75,700 
60,000 
45,600 
52,600 
46,100 
29,200 



17,700 



580,500 



100,000 
29,000 



709,500 



9,614,500 

723,600 
10,338,100 



Maximum 
Output* 



kw 



212,000 
354,000 
410,000 

28,000 
343,000 
611,900 
101,600 

87,000 

32,000 
4,160 

41,160 



126,000 
76,800 
65,500 
77,000 
68,700 
48,800 
54,000 
45,600 
41,200 



57,500 
16,000 



6,400 
10,000 



Annual Energy 
Output (Net)t 



799. 

825, 

1,050, 

1 

722, 

2,959 

679, 

522, 

79 

28 

15 



kwh 



170,290 
756,900 
673,000 
049,000 
608,000 
299,060 
561,000 
517,000 
725,588 
690,291 
787,660 



7,684,837,789 



805,339,000 
561,083,000 
424,284,000 
542,478,275 
439,465,300 
278,360,000 
374,643,000 
343,384,740 
259,588,500 



4,028,625,815 



110,827,500 
1,398,673 



4,140,851,988 



74,770,623 
1,071,000 



75,841,623 
50,932,820,713 

7,760,679,412 
58,693,500,125 



The power capacity and output reported in this table are the 20-minute peaks for the month of December. Since the 

various maximum outputs do not coincide, their sum is not the peak load of the system. 
fNet output of generating station or total received from supplier. 
**25 cycles per second. 
t25 and 60 cycles per second. 



90 



Appendix I — Operations 

POWER RESOURCES AND REQUIREMENTS 



Dependable Peak Capacity 
Generated-Hydro-electric . 
Thermal -electric 



Total Generated 

Purchased 

Total Generated and Purchased 
Reserve or Deficiency 



^Primary Power Requirements 

Ratio of Reserve or Deficiency to Requirements 





EAST SYSTE 


M 




1967 
kw 


1968 
kw 


Net Increase 
kw % 


4,611,000 
3,176,000 


4,931,000 
3,974,000 


320,000 
798,000 


6.9 
25.1 


7,787,000 


8,905,000 


1,118,000 


14.4 


522,500 


723,600 


201,100 


38.5 


8,309,500 


9,628,600 


1,319,100 


15.9 


91,575 


241,164 


- 


- 


8,401,075 


9,387,436 


986,361 


11.7 


1.1 


2.6 


- 


_ 



*The capacities shown are those available for a 20-minute for each systems and their sum. Some part of East System 

period at the times of system primary peak demand in requirements is subject to interruption over the peak period 

December, the capacity of purchased power sources being in accordance with contract terms accepted by customers, 

based on the terms of the purchased contract. the total possible load subject to interruption at the time of 

Requirements shown are the December coincident peaks the 1968 peak being 315,000 kw. 

Energy Made Available by the Commission 





1967 


1968 


Increase 

or 
Decrease 


EAST SYSTEM 
Generated (net) 

Hydro-electric 

Thermal-electric and 

combustion-turbine . . . 


1 

30,654,611,813 
12,900,256,969 


cwh 

47,561,858,842 
3,184,031,127 


31,043,429,325 

15,748,539,400 

46,791,968,725 

7,684,837,789 


kwh 

51,772,542,570 
2,704,263,944 


per cent 

1.3 

22.1 

7.4 

6.9 

8.9 

15.1 

1.4 

13.8 

20.0 

13.9 

67.7 

5.8 

169.2 

9.0 

22.1 

7.9 

4.5 

8.6 

10,9 

7.5 


Total Generated 

Purchased 

Primary 

Secondary 


43,554,868,782 
7,191,021,187 


Total 

WEST SYSTEM 
Generated (net) 

Hydro-electric 

Thermal-electric, 

combustion-turbine, 
and diesel-electric 


50,745,889,969 

3,540,816,780 
93,486,000 


50,745,889,969 

3,795,110,329 

74,253,038 


54,476,806,514 

4,028,625,815 
112,226,173 


54,476,806,514 

4,016,781,128 
199,912,483 


Total Generated 

Purchased 

Primary 

Secondary 


3,634,302,780 
235,060,587 


4,140,851,988 
75,841,623 


Total 

TOTAL 
Generated (net) 

Hydro-electric 

Thermal -electric, 

combustion-turbine , 
and diesel-electric 


3,869,363,367 

34,195,428,593 
12,993,742,969 


3,869,363,367 

51,356,969,171 
3,258,284,165 


4,216,693,611 

35,072,055,140 

15,860,765,573 

50,932,820,713 

7,760,679,412 


4,216,693,611 

55,789,323,698 
2,904,176,427 


Total Generated 

Purchased 

Primary 

Secondary 


47,189,171,562 
7,426,081,774 


Total 


54,615,253,336 


54,615,253,336 


58,693,500,125 


58,693,500,125 















Resources and Requirements 



97 



DECEMBER 1967 AND 1968 



WEST SYSTEM 


TOTAL 


1967 
kw 


1968 
kw 


Net Increase 

kw % 


1967 
kw 


1968 

kw 


Net Increase 
kw % 


585,800 
100,000 


580,500 
129,000 


-5,300 
29,000 


.9 
29.0 


5,196,800 
3,276,000 


5,511,500 
4,103,000 


314,700 
827,000 


6.1 

25.2 


685,800 


709,500 


23,700 


3.5 


8,472,800 


9,614,500 


1,141,700 


13.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


522,500 


723,600 


201,100 


38.5 


685,800 


709,500 


23,700 


3.5 


8,995,300 


10,338,100 


1,342,800 


14.9 


123,080 


102,560 


-20,520 


-16.7 


- 


- 


- 


- 


562,720 


606,940 


44,220 


7.9 


8,963,795 


9,994,376 


1,030,581 


11.5 


21.9 


16.9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 



DISPOSAL OF ENERGY BY THE COMMISSION 

1968 



Sales to Municipalities 

Sales to Direct Customers 

- Interconnected Systems 



Retail Sales 

In Towns and Villages 

In Rural Areas 

To Special Customers 

- Interconnected Systems 



Primary 

33,426,062,268f 
11,957,334,606 
294,936,383f 

45,678,333,257 



302,591,495 
5,324,505,400 
609,281,886 
29,705,009f 

6,266,083,790 



Secondary 



80,242,740 
2,789,484,504 



1,657,048 



1,657,048 



Total 

33,426,062,268 

12,037,577,346 

3,084,420,887 



2,869,727,244 48,548,060,501 



302,591,495 

5,324,505,400 

610,938,934 

29,705,009 

6,267,740,838 



Total Commission Sales 51,944,417,047 2,871,384,292 54,815,801,339 



Distribution Losses and Unaccounted 

for 481,266,877 

Transmission Losses and 

Unaccounted for 3,363,639,774* 

Total Primary Demand and Secondary 55,789,323,698 

Load Carried 



481,266,877 

32,792,135* 3,396,431,909 



2,904,176,427 58,693 500,125 



* The apportioning of transmission losses to primary and secondary loads is estimated. 
t These kilowatt-hours of primary energy amounting in total to 33, 750, 703, 660 kwh were delivered 
for resale. 



98 



Appendix I — Operations 



ANALYSIS OF 

by the Commission and Associated 





Sales by Associated 

Municipal 

Electrical Utilities 

Listed in 

Statement A 


Ultimate use: 

Residential service 


kwh 
11,357,000,552 


Summer service 






Total sales residential-type service 


11,357,000,552 

7,154,370,619 

13,685,577,988 


Commercial service 


Industrial power service — primary 


— secondary 


Farm 




Street lighting 

Unclassified as to ultimate use: 

To interconnected systems for resale — primary 


406,292,924 


- secondary 








Total sales to ultimate customers and for resale 


32,603,242,083 

1,244,281,090 
216,314,630 

205,146,275 


Adjustments: 

Distribution losses and unaccounted for - MEU 

Generated by MEU listed in Statement A 


Purchased by MEU listed in Statement A from sources other than the 

Commission 




Commission sales to municipalities and to direct and retail customers .... 
Distribution losses and unaccounted for — Commission 


33,426,062,268 


Transmission losses and unaccounted for - Commission 











For administrative purposes classified with retail sales. 



Analysis of Energy Sales 



99 



ENERGY SALES 

Municipal Electrical Utilities during 1968 



Sales by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 




To Retail Customers 


To Direct 
Customers 




In Certain 

Towns and 

Villages 

Served by 
Commission 
Distribution 

Facilities 


In Rural Areas 


Special* 


Total 


kwh 
174,566,700 


kwh 

1,992,463,900 
181,449,700 


kwh 


kwh 


kwh 
13,524,031,152 






181,449,700 










174,566,700 

100,274,795 

23,249,700 


2,173,913,600 

562,106,300 

1,162,315,200 






13,705,480,852 


609,281,886 
1,657,048 




7,816,751,714 


11,957,334,606 
80,242,740 


27,437,759,380 
81,899,788 




1,403,287,300 
22,883,000 


1,403,287,300 


4,500,300 




433,676,224 


29,705,009 


294,936,383 
2,789,484,504 


324,641,392 






2,789,484,504 








302,591,495 


5,324,505,400 


640,643,943 


15,121,998,233 


53,992,981,154 
1,244,281,090 








216,314,630 










205,146,275 










302,591,495 
22,884,997 


5,324,505,400 
458,381,880 


640,643,943 


15,121,998,233 


54,815,801,339 
481,266,877 






3,396,431,909 










58,693,500,125 













100 Appendix I — Operations 

TOTAL MILEAGE OF TRANSMISSION LINES AND CIRCUITS 





Line Route or 
Structure Miles 


Circuit Miles 


Voltage and Structure 


At Dec. 
31,1967 


At Dec. 
31,1968 


At Dec. 
31,1967 


At Dec. 
31,1968 


East System 

500,000-volt aluminum tower 

500,000-volt steel tower 


76.01 
359.51 

3,365.87 

252.01 

1.32 

1,914.88 

1,821.12 

40.01 

11.20 

3.31 

6,400.54 


76.01 

359.51 

2.50 

3,484.48 

252.01 

1.94 

1,918.34 

1,831.52 

41.78 

2.20 

6.15 

6,364.45 


76.01 
359.51 

4,503.80 

252.01 

2.64 

3,218.16 

1,832.34 

74.32 

12.33 

3.31 

6,865.86 


76.01 
359 51 


345,000-volt steel tower 


2.50 


230,000-volt steel tower 


4,730.54 

252.01 

3 88 


230,000-volt wood pole 

230,000-volt underground 


115,000-volt steel tower 


3,221.62 


115,000-volt wood pole 


1,842.74 

77.25 

2.20 


115,000-volt underground 

60,000-volt steel tower 


60,000-volt wood pole 


6.15 


44,000-volt and less, wood and steel 


6,832.01 


Total— East System 


14,245.78 

424.15 
917.32 
203.72 
501.24 


14,340.89 

104.60 
424.15 
917.32 
203.72 
501.54 


17,200.29 

628.05 
917.32 
203.72 
542.59 


17,406.72 


West System 

230,000-volt steel tower 


209.20 


115,000-volt steel tower 


628.05 


115,000-volt wood pole 


917.32 


69 000-volt wood pole . 


203.72 


44,000-volt and less, wood and steel 


542.89 


Total-West System 


2,046.43 


2,151.33 


2,291.68 


2,501.18 


Total East and West Systems 


16,292.21 


16,492.22 


19,491.97 


19,907.90 





APPENDIX II— FINANCIAL 



Table of Financial Statements 

Statement of Operations 29 

Balance Sheet 30 

Reserve for Stabilization of Rates and Contingencies 32 

Equities Accumulated through Debt Retirement Charges 32 

Source and Application of Funds 34 

Notes to Financial Statements 35 

Fixed Assets 102 

Accumulated Depreciation 104 

Frequency Standardization Account 104 

Bonds Payable 105 

Advances from the Province of Ontario 107 

Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power to Municipalities 108 

Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power — All Customers 127 

Equities Accumulated through Debt Retirement Charges 128 



101 



102 



Appendix 11 — Finance 



FIXED 

for the Year Ended 





IN 




Balance 

December 31, 

1967 


Changes 




Placed 

in 
Service 


Relocated 

and 
Reclassified 


Power Supply Facilities 
Generating Stations 

Thermal-Electric- 
Conventional 


$ 

398,734,626 

1,826,744 

31,695,983 


$ 

92,492,817 
2,610,400 
5,807,517 


$ 
209,918 


Nuclear 

Combustion Turbine 


52,572 


Total Thermal-Electric 

Hydro-Electric 


432,257,353 
1,399,201,210 


100,910,734 
20,422,253 


157,346 
3,156 


Total Generating Stations .... 

Transformer Stations 

Transmission Lines 

Communication Equipment 
Retail Distribution Plant 
and Equipment 


1,831,458,563 

351,272,637 

376,356,191 

13,557,819 

358,444,378 


121,332,987 

25,453,105 

24,784,236 

567,851 

22,322,347 


154,190 

150,706 

152,393 

3,000 

156,814 






Total Power Supply Facilities . 


2,931,089,588 


194,460,526 


2,063 


Administrative and Service 

Land, Buildings, and Equipment 

Land and Buildings 

Office and Service Equipment 


36,054,756 
69,550,159 


5,141,962 
13,604,789 


1,439 
624 


Total Administrative and 
Service Land, Buildings, and 
Equipment 


105,604,915 


18,746,751 


2,063 


Total Fixed Assets 


3,036,694,503 


213,207,277 





Fixed Asset* 



103 



ASSETS 
December 31, 1968 



Service 


Under 

Construction 

December 31, 

1968 


Total 
Fixed Assets 
December 31, 

1968 




during Year 


Balance 

December 31, 

1968 




Retired 


Expenditures 
during 

1968 


$ 

203,718 
404 


$ 

490,813,807 

4,437,144 

37,555,668 


$ 

180,329,086 

83,339,645 

159,677 


$ 

671,142,893 
87,776,789 
37,715,345 


$ 

89,441,009 

51,812,209 

1,039,010 


204,122 
615,144 


532,806,619 
1,419,011,475 


263,828,408 
66,020,968 


796,635,027 
1485,032,443 


142,292,228 
50,479,787 


819,266 

2,985,291 

1,639,876 

53,290 

9,101,621 


1,951,818,094 

373,891,157 

399,348,158 

14,069,380 

371,821,918 


329,849,376 

37,267,154 

60,139,805 

4,679,143 

3,817,895 


2,281,667,470 

411,158,311 

459,487,963 

18,748,523 

375,639,813 


192,772,015 

38,270,503 

53,438,922 

4,467,917 

23,275,793 


14,599,344 


3,110,948,707 


435,753,373 


3,546,702,080 


312,225,150 


252,688 
6,725,196 


40,945,469 
76,430,376 


4,888,512 


45,833,981 
76,430,376 


3,509,965 
13,604,789 


6,977,884 


117,375,845 


4,888,512 


122,264,357 


17,114,754 


21,577,228 


3,228,324,552 


440,641,885 


3,668,966,437 


329,339,904 



Disposition of Fixed Assets Retired during 1968 

Cost of fixed assets retired $21,577,228 

Deduct: 

Proceeds from sales $6,574,204 

Charges to operations 549,845 

Charges to plant under construction 180,942 7,304,991 

Net charge to accumulated depreciation $14,272,237 



04 



Appendix 11 — Finance 

ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 





Power Supply Facilities 








Generation, 








Transformation, 










Transmission, 

and 

Communications 


Retail 
Distribution 


Administrative 

and Service 

Buildings and 

Equipment 


Total 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


Balances at December 31, 










1967 


388,262,299 


108,602,237 


42,801,505 


539,666,041 


Add: 










Provision in the year: 










Charged directly 










to operations . . . 


39,814,319 


13,184,736 




52,999,055 


Charged to various 










overhead accounts 


16,444 




8,665,379 


8,681,823 


Transfers 


40,248 


38,466 


1,782 




Excess of salvage 










recoveries over 










removal costs on 










assets retired .... 


840,264 


175,552 


1,902 


1,013,914 


Other adjustments . . 


473,865 


299,673 


1,095 


772,443 




429,366,943 


122,300,664 


51,465,669 


603,133,276 


Deduct: 










Cost of fixed assets 










retired, less 










proceeds from 










sales 


2,680,873 


5,781,932 


5,809,432 


14,272,237 


Balances at December 31, 










1968 


426,686,070 


116,518,732 


45,656,237 


588,861,039 


FREC 


>UENCY STAND 


ARDIZATION 


ACCOUNT 


j 




for the Year End< 


id December 31 


1968 




Balance at December 31, 196' 


1 






$ 
109,672,724 


Add interest for the year 








4,017,020 











113,689,744 

Deduct amortization charged to cost of power 16,134,225 

Balance at December 31, 1968 97,555,519 



Bonds Payable 



105 



BONDS PAYABLE IN CANADIAN FUNDS 
AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1968 

Guaranteed as to Principal and Interest by the Province of Ontario 











Principal 




Callable 




Interest 


Outstanding 


Date of Maturity 


on or after 


Date of Issue 


Rate 


December 31, 1968 


July 1, 1969 




July 1, 1959 


% 
5 3 / 4 


$ 
11,155,000 


July 15, 1969 


July 15, 1966 


July 15, 1953 


4V* 


24,504,500 


July 15, 1969 


July 15, 1966 


July 15, 1953 


4% 


17,528,000 


Nov. 1, 1969 


Nov. 1, 1967 


Nov. 1, 1949 


3 


48,481,000 


Jan. 1, 1970 


- 


Jan. 1, 1930 


4 3 / 4 


9,001,000 


Feb. 15, 1970 


- 


Feb. 15, 1960 


6 


14,239,500 


Apr. 1, 1970 


Apr. 1, 1968 


Apr. 1, 1950 


3 


52,497,000 


June 15, 1970 


- 


June 15, 1962 


4Vl 


10,224,000 


July 15, 1970 


- 


July 15, 1960 


5V4 


4,637,500 


Oct. 15, 1970 


Oct. 15, 1969 


Oct. 15, 1958 


4Vz 


4,633,000 


Feb. 1, 1971 


- 


Feb. 1, 1964 


5 


15,091,600 


Feb. 15, 1971 


- 


Feb. 15, 1961 


5% 


5,114,000 


Mar. 1, 1971 


- 


Mar. 1, 1963 


5 


13,290,000 


June 1, 1971 


June 1, 1961 


June 1, 1946 


2% 


18,034,000 


Nov. 15, 1971 


- 


Nov. 15, 1961 


4 3 / 4 


6,627,500 


July 5, 1972 


- 


July 5, 1967 


6 


15,000,000 


Sept. 20, 1972 


- 


Sept. 20, 1967 


6V2 


12,000,000 


Mar. 15, 1973 


- 


Mar. 15, 1967 


5 3 / 4 


11,000,000 


June 15, 1973 


June 15, 1971 


June 15, 1950 


3 


54,300,000 


July 15, 1974 


July 15, 1972 


July 15, 1956 


4 


46,723,500 


Oct. 15, 1974 


Oct. 15, 1972 


Oct. 15, 1956 


4Vz 


24,698,500 


Aug. 15, 1975 


Feb. 15, 1972 


Feb. 15, 1957 


4% 


33,825,000 


Jan. 15, 1976 


Jan. 15, 1974 


Jan. 15, 1956 


4 


44,334,500 


Nov. 15, 1976 


Nov. 15, 1974 


Nov. 15, 1957 


5 


34,851,000 


Jan. 5, 1977 


Jan. 5, 1975 


Jan. 5, 1967 


6% 


15,000,000 


Mar. 1, 1977 


Mar. 1, 1975 


Mar. 1, 1955 


3Vi 


39,175,000 


Apr. 1, 1977 


Apr. 1, 1974 


Apr. 1, 1957 


5 


75,119,500 


Mar. 1, 1978 


Mar. 1, 1976 


Mar. 1, 1958 


4Vi 


33,494,000 


Oct. 15, 1978 


Oct. 15, 1976 


Oct. 15, 1958 


5 


47,010,000 


May 15, 1979 


May 15, 1974 


May 15, 1954 


3% 


34,633,000 


July 1, 1979 


- 


July 1, 1959 


5 3 / 4 


29,898,500 


Oct. 15, 1979 


Oct. 15, 1974 


Oct. 15, 1954 


Vh 


49,945,000 


Feb. 15, 1980 


Feb. 15, 1978 


Feb. 15, 1960 


6 


- 27,023,000 


July 15, 1980 


July 15, 1978 


July 15, 1960 


5 J /2 


37,484,000 


Feb. 15, 1981 


Feb. 15, 1979 


Feb. 15, 1961 


SYi 


40,664,000 


June 15, 1982 


June 15, 1979 


June 15, 1962 


5 


34,438,000 


Mar. 1, 1983 


Mar. 1, 1980 


Mar. 1, 1963 


SYa 


42,196,000 


June 15, 1983 


June 15, 1979 


June 15, 1963 


5 


53,555,900 


Nov. 15, 1983 


Nov. 15, 1980 


Nov. 15, 1961 


SYa 


41,468,000 


Feb. 1, 1984 


Feb. 1, 1981 


Feb. 1, 1964 


SYa 


52,787,300 


Oct. 1, 1984 


Oct. 1, 1980 


Oct. 1, 1964 


5% 


56,338,000 


Feb. 1, 1985 


Feb. 1, 1981 


Feb. 1, 1965 


5% 


72,352,500 


July 5, 1987 


July 5, 1985 


July 5, 1967 


6% 


24,900,000 


Jan. 4, 1988 


Jan. 4, 1984 


Jan. 4, 1966 


5% 


52,447,000 


Apr. 15, 1988 


Apr. 15, 1984 


Apr. 15, 1966 


6 


49,347,500 


July 5, 1988 


July 5, 1984 


July 5, 1966 


6 


47,968,000 



Continued 



106 



Appendix 11 — Finance 



BONDS PAYABLE IN CANADIAN FUNDS 
AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1968— Concluded 

Guaranteed as to Principal and Interest by the Province of Ontario 



Date of Maturity 


Callable 
on or after 


Date of Issue 


Interest 
Rate 


Principal 

Outstanding 

December 31, 1968 


Jan. 5, 1989 
Sept. 20, 1989 
Mar. 15, 1990 
Apr. 1, 1992 
Aug. 15, 1992 
Sept. 18, 1992 


Jan. 5, 1985 
Sept. 20, 1985 
Mar. 15, 1986 
Apr 1, 1988 
Aug. 15, 1988 
Sept. 18, 1988 

le in Canadian funds 


Jan. 5, 1967 
Sept. 20, 1967 
Mar. 15, 1967 
Apr. 1, 1968 
Aug. 15, 1968 
Sept. 18, 1968 


% 

6% 
6% 

6 

7 
7 
7 


$ 

41,440,500 
28,000,000 
48,417,000 
48,900,000 
50,000,000 
65,000,000 


Total bonds payab 


1,770,791,800 







BONDS PAYABLE IN UNITED STATES FUNDS 
AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1968 

Held by the Province of Ontario and having terms identical with issues 
sold in the United States by the Province of Ontario on behalf of the Commission 











Principal 




Callable 




Interest 


Outstanding 


Date of Maturity 


on or after 


Date of Issue 


Rate 


December 31, 1968 


May 15, 1971 


May 15, 1956 


May 15, 1951 


% 
3% 


$ 
47,265,000 


Sept. 1, 1972 


Sept. 1, 1956 


Sept. 1, 1951 


3% 


41,867,000 


Feb. 1, 1975 


Feb. 1, 1958 


Feb. 1, 1953 


3% 


45,784,000 


Nov. 1, 1978 


Nov. 1, 1958 


Nov. 1, 1953 


3-5/8 


47,732,000 


Mar. 15, 1980 


Mar. 15, 1959 


Mar. 15, 1954 


3-1/8 


29,765,000 


May 15, 1981 


May 15, 1961 


May 15, 1956 


3-7/8 


43,518,000 


Feb. 1, 1984 


Feb. 1, 1969 


Feb. 1, 1959 


4% 


71,769,000 


Sept. 15, 1990 


Sept. 15, 1975 


Sept. 15, 1965 


4% 


49,545,000 


Apr. 1, 1996 


Apr. 1, 1981 


Apr. 1, 1966 


SVz 


34,465,000 


Apr. 15, 1997 


Apr. 15, 1982 


Apr. 15, 1967 


5-5/8 


63,486,000 


Dec. 1, 1997 


Dec. 1, 1982 


Dec. 1, 1967 


6-7/8 


74,980,000 


Aug. 1, 1998 


Aug. 1, 1983 


Aug. 1, 1968 


7-1/8 


75,000,000 




625,176,000 


Add exchange pre 


mium (net) at date c 
3le in United States 


>f issue 




22,228,186 








Total bonds payal 


647,404,186 












Bonds Payable 107 

Summary of Changes in Bonds Payable during the Year Ended December 31, 1968 





Payable in 
Canadian Funds 


Payable in 
United States 
Funds 


Outstanding at December 31, 1967 

Add issues during the year 


$ 

1,725,869,800 
165,000,000 


$ 

537,751,033 
113,381,374 




Deduct redemptions during the year 


1,890,869,800 
120,078,000 


651,132,407 
3,728,221 




Outstanding at December 31, 1968 


1,770,791,800 


647,404,186 



ADVANCES FROM THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1968 

Annuity bonds repayable to the Province in accordance with the terms of Province 
of Ontario bonds issued in part for the purposes of the Commission 



Date of Maturity 


Interest Rate 


Balances of Advances 
Outstanding December 31, 1968 
(Payable in Canadian, United 
States, or Sterling Funds) 


May 15, 1969-1970 


% 

4% 

4 


$ 
849,598 


Jan. 15, 1969-1971 


853,518 


June 1, 1969-1971 


1,165,080 






Total advances 


2,868,196 







Summary of Changes in Advances from the Province of Ontario 
during the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



Balance of advances at December 31, 1967 
Deduct repayments during the year 



Balance of advances at December 31, 1968 



4,330,961 
1,462,765 

2,868,196 



108 



Appendix 11 — Finance 



STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION OF THE 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary Power and 

Energy Supplied 

during Year 

(Principal Bases of 
Cost Allocation) 



Average of 

Monthly 

Peak Loads 



Energy 



Common 

Demand 

Costs 

(Note 1) 



Transformation 
and Metering 

(Note 2) 



Stage I 



Stage II 



Special 
Facili- 
ties 

(Note 3) 



Frequency 
Standardi- 
zation 

(Note 4) 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig . . 

Ajax 

Alexandria . . 
Alfred 

Alliston .... 
Almonte .... 
Alvinston . . . 
Amherstburg 
Ancaster Twp. 

Apple Hill . . . 

Arkona 

Amprior .... 

Arthur 

Athens 

Atikokan Twp 

Aurora 

Avonmore . . 

Aylmer 

Ayr 

Baden 

Bancroft .... 

Barrie 

Barry's Bay . . 
Bath 

Beachburg . . 
Beachville . . . 
Beamsville . . 
Beaverton . . . 
Beeton 

Belle River . . 
Belleville .... 
Belmont .... 
Blenheim . . . 
Bloom field . . 

Blyth 

Bobcaygeon . 

Bolton 

Bothwell .... 
Bowmanville . 



kw 

5,934.8 

423.2 

11,212.4 

3,854.7 

937.4 

3,852.5 
2,605.3 
366.3 
5,218.8 
2,838.8 

165.0 
335.6 

7,276.4 

1,103.9 

742.9 

3,828.7 
8,830.3 
191.6 
5,404.8 
1,112.6 

1,048.4 

1,799.5 

29,569.5 

958.2 

545.9 

484.3 
2,505.1 
2,875.7 
1,576.3 

704.8 

1,434.4 

30,004.4 

1,215.3 

2,390.7 

628.3 

930.2 
1,384.2 
1,778.4 

591.0 
10,234.6 



megawatt- 
hours 

30,574.1 

2,146.7 

63,797.0 

20,547.0 

5,006.6 

22,149.2 
13,336.8 
1,578.4 
33,044.5 
15,520.5 

825.4 

1,695.3 

44,651.1 

5,962.9 

3,934.6 

22,216.3 

50,522.7 

940.0 

28,384.4 

5,588.4 

5,070.4 
9,053.9 
167,456.0 
4,764.6 
2,773.0 

2,416.2 

16,688.8 

15,114.4 

9,116.9 

3,726.9 

8,244.5 

175,530.5 

6,610.3 

12,868.0 

3,006.8 

4,864.8 
7,855.2 

10,478.1 
3,067.2 

54,557.6 



$ 
160,698 

11,460 
303,601 
104,374 

25,382 

104,314 

70,545 

9,918 

141,311 
76,867 

4,467 

9,087 

197,025 

29,889 

20,115 

103,670 

239,099 

5,188 

146,348 

30,125 

28,389 
48,725 
800,662 
25,945 
14,782 

13,114 

67,832 
77,867 
42,683 
19,084 

38,838 
812,438 
32,909 
64,734 
17,012 

25,187 
37,480 
48,154 
16,001 
277,125 



$ 
15,001 

1,049 
28,341 

9,676 

2,324 

9,738 

6,585 

908 

13,191 

7,038 

409 

832 

18,115 

2,777 

1,842 

9,493 

22,320 

475 

13,510 

2,759 

2,622 
4,477 
74,742 
2,376 
1,353 

1,224 
6,332 
7,269 
3,984 
1,747 

3,568 
75,841 
3,019 
5,927 
1,588 

2,306 
3,432 
4,409 
1,465 
25,870 



$ 
1,099 

3,644 
2,435 

951 

7,373 

429 

872 

14,912 

717 

1,930 

9,945 

498 
8,128 
2,890 

1,487 
3,893 

2,489 
1,418 



1,83 
3,100 



2,822 
6,210 



2,416 
3,595 
4,619 
1,535 



791 

2,881 
386 



814 
2,770 

1,786 



1,412 
531 



9,604 
2,790 

916 



944 

345 

1,027 

524 

276 
2,449 



1,044 



592 



"See note 8, page 126. 



Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 



109 



COST OF PRIMARY POWER TO MUNICIPALITIES 

Ended December 31, 1968 















TOTAL COST 












Demand Cost 


Of 




Energy @ 


Cost of 






(Note 7) 


Primary Power 










Return 


2.75 Mills 


Primary 


AMOUNTS 


Balance 








on Equity 


perKwh 


Power 


BILLED AT 


(Refunded 






Mais 


(Note 5) 


(Note 6) 


ALLOCATED 


Interim Rates 


or Charged) 


$ per Kw 


$ per Kw 


per Kwh 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 








22,245 


84,079 


256,128 


251,090.20 


5,037.80 


28.98 


43.16 


8.38 


2,389 


5,903 


18,392 


18,467.34 


75.34 


29.50 


43.46 


8.57 


14,311 


175,442 


501,560 


498,604.57 


2,955.43 


29.08 


44.73 


7.86 


9,555 


56,504 


166,956 


166,813.29 


142.71 


28.65 


43.31 


8.13 


1,254 


13,768 


43,124 


42,766.21 


357.79 


31.31 


46.00 


8.61 


9,805 


60,910 


167,897 


170,580.16 


2,683.16 


27.76 


43.58 


7.58 


5,316 


36,676 


112,563 


110,789.36 


1,773.64 


29.12 


43.21 


8.44 


2,477 


4,341 


14,740 


14,473.74 


266.26 


28.39 


40.24 


9.34 


1 7,890 


90,873 


244,927 


240,476.16 


4,450.84 


29.51 


46.93 


7.41 


8,601 


42,681 


133,874 


134,095.87 


221.87 


32.12 


47.16 


8.63 


696 


2,270 


6,962 


6,746.42 


215.58 


28.43 


42.19 


8.43 


1,842 


4,662 


14,618 


14,662.05 


44.05 


29.66 


43.56 


8.62 


16,357 


122,791 


341,536 


342,756.72 


1,220.72 


30.05 


46.94 


7.65 


4,280 


16,398 


46,584 


46,522.39 


61.61 


27.34 


42.20 


7.81 


2,227 


10,820 


32,851 


32,418.59 


432.41 


29.65 


44.22 


8.35 


12,071 


61,095 


181,736 


182,065.48 


329.48 


31.51 


47.47 


8.18 


16,584 


138,937 


413,053 


405,378.48 


7,674.52 


31.04 


46.78 


8.18 


429 


2,585 


8,413 


8,405.66 


7.34 


30.41 


43.91 


8.95 


17,567 


78,057 


245,606 


239,904.18 


5,701.82 


30.99 


45.44 


8.65 


3,940 


15,368 


50,540 


50,242.11 


297.89 


31.61 


45.43 


9.04 


5,554 


13,944 


44,100 


43,920.55 


179.45 


28.75 


42.06 


8.70 


3,562 


24,898 


79,390 


77,939.32 


1,450.68 


30.27 


44.12 


8.77 


68,816 


460,504 


1,281,876 


1,266,031.88 


15,844.12 


27.77 


43.35 


7.66 


1,323 


13,103 


43,069 


42,777.84 


291.16 


31.27 


44.95 


9.04 


1,321 


7,626 


24,131 


23,767.04 


363.96 


30.23 


44.20 


8.70 


870 


6,645 


20,355 


20,172.45 


182.55 


28.30 


42.03 


8.42 


10,668 


45,894 


117,849 


116,324.70 


1,524.30 


28.72 


47.04 


7.06 


6,607 


41,565 


129,066 


128,736.76 


329.24 


30.42 


44.88 


8.54 


5,405 


25,071 


68,148 


65,824.63 


2,323.37 


27.32 


43.23 


7.47 


3,146 


10,249 


30,642 


29,848.96 


793.04 


28.93 


43.48 


8.22 


3,878 


22,672 


68,879 


68,542.14 


336.86 


32.21 


48.02 


8.35 


89,370 


482,709 


1,299,069 


1,280,029.51 


19,039.49 


27.20 


43.30 


7.40 


1,314 


18,178 


59,260 


58,945.49 


314.51 


33.79 


48.76 


8.96 


8,997 


35,387 


110,433 


110,347.70 


85.30 


31.39 


46.19 


8.58 


2,280 


8,269 


24,903 


24,683.68 


219.32 


26.47 


39.63 


8.28 


3,436 


13,378 


42,642 


42,524.61 


117.39 


31.46 


45.84 


8.77 


2,607 


21,602 


65,238 


64,324.47 


913.53 


31.52 


47.13 


8.31 


4,919 


28,815 


86,413 


85,568.72 


844.28 


32.38 


48.59 


8.25 


2,766 


8,435 


26,443 


26,342.30 


100.70 


30.47 


44.74 


8.62 


31,362 


150,033 


427,375 


423,578.91 


3,796.09 


27.10 


41.76 


7.83 



110 



Appendix II — Finance 



STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION OF THE 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary Power and 

Energy Supplied 

during Year 

(Principal Bases of 
Cost Allocation) 



Average of 

Monthly 

Peak Loads 



Energy 



Common 

Demand 

Costs 

(Note 1) 



Transformation 
and Metering 

(Note 2) 



Stage 



Stage II 



Special 
Facili- 
ties 

(Note 3) 



Frequency 
Standardi- 
zation 

(Note 4) 



Bracebridge . . 

Bradford 

Braeside 

Brampton 
Brantford 

Brantford Twp. 

Brechin 

Bridgeport . . . 

Brigden 

Brighton 

Brockville 

Brussels 

Burford 

Burgessville . . . 
Burk's Falls . . 

Burlington . . . 
Cache Bay . . . 
Caledonia 
Campbellford . 
Campbellville . 

Cannington . . . 

Capreol 

Cardinal 

Carleton Place 
Casselman 

Cayuga 

Chalk River . . 
Chapleau 

Chatham 

Chatsworth . . . 

Chesley 

Chesterville . . . 
Chippawa 

Clifford 

Clinton 

Cobden 

Cobourg 

Cochrane 
Colborne 
Coldwater . . . . 



kw 

1,368.4 

2,557.0 

2,010.6 

35,991.7 

62,178.0 

10,126.0 

174.7 

1,537.6 

315.2 

2,369.2 

22,712.4 

762.9 

997.2 

287.2 

1,061.4 

61,889.0 

264.7 

1,494.4 

2,008.3 

193.5 

956.3 

2,4)0.5 
1,031.6 
4,352.0 
1,004.3 

697.2 

585.3 

1,918.1 

34,855.1 

336.6 

1,631.5 
1,829.0 
1,976.6 
458.4 
2,812.0 

780.7 

15,915.5 

3,793.4 

1,426.9 

926.5 



megawatt- 
hours 

4,159.9 
14,663.8 

8,962.5 
203,132.9 
360,957.8 

58,585.8 

886.2 

8,181.6 

1,504.8 

12,769.9 

130,688.0 
3,910.4 
5,229.9 
1,212.4 
5,269.2 

356,051.8 

1,372.8 

8,3920 

6,003.1 

937.2 

4,964.7 
13,958.7 

5,427.0 
24,407.2 

4,889.9 

3,896.8 

3,431.4 

10,164.0 

201,591.8 

1,694.4 

' 8,414.4 
9,196.6 

10,919.9 
2,464.0 

15,006.7 

4,009.2 

92,081.5 

21,597.8 

8,042.4 

4,838.1 



$ 

37,054 

69,236 

54,441 

974,558 

1,683,612 

274,185 
4,730 

41,634 
8,535 

64,151 

614,990 

20,657 

27,001 

7,776 

28,740 

1,675,786 

7,167 

40,465 

54,379 

5,240 

25,894 
65,270 
27,933 
117,840 
27,194 

18,877 

15,848 

51,936 

943,783 

9,113 

44,177 
49,524 
53,521 
12,413 
76,142 

21,139 

430,949 

102,716 

38,637 

25,087 



$ 

3,459 

6,464 

5,072 

90,968 

157,166 

25,503 

433 

3,812 

781 

5,989 

57,410 

1,891 

2,472 

712 

2,683 

155,971 

669 

3,705 

5,076 

480 

2,417 
6,093 
2,558 
10,89 7 
2,490 

1,729 

1,479 

4,756 

88,102 

835 

4,124 
4,535 
4,901 
1,137 
7,108 

1,974 

40,229 

183 

3,538 

2,309 



528 



4,997 
454 

3,994 
819 



1,982 

2,590 

746 



24,916 

3,882 

503 

2,679 
5,573 
2,609 

1,811 

4,982 
874 



4,751 
5,134 
1,191 



3,706 

1,752 



$ 
2,965 

320 



9,291 



265 

69,769 

4,633 

170 
535 

74 

167 

572 

6,534 

229 



684 

1,278 

1,005 

107,975 

186,534 

30,377 

87 

4,613 

946 

1,185 

11,356 

2,289 

2,992 

862 

531 

185,667 

4,483 

1,004 

581 

478 

516 

2,176 

502 

2,092 
293 

104,565 
168 

816 
915 

5,930 
1,375 
8,436 

390 
7,958 

713 
463 



*See note 8, page 126. 



Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 



11 



COST OF PRIMARY POWER TO MUNICIPALITIES 

Ended December 31, 1968 















Total cost 












Demand Cost 


Of 




Energy @ 


Cost of 






(Note 7) 


Primary Power 










Return 


2.75 Mills 


Primary 


Amounts 


Balance 








on Equity 


perKwh 


Power 


Billed at 


(Refunded 






Mais 


(Note 5) 


(Note 6) 


Allocated 


Interim Rates 


or Charged) 


$ psr K\n 


$ per Kw 


per Kwh 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 








803 


11,440 


54,799 


52,633.00 


2,166.00 


31.68 


40.05 


13.17 


7,425 


40,325 


109,878 


108,459.38 


1,418.62 


27.20 


42.97 


7.49 


3,301 


24,647 


82,712 


82,502.49 


209.51 


28.87 


41.14 


9.23 


63,158 


558,616 


1,668,959 


1,660,075.82 


8,883.18 


30.85 


46.37 


8.22 


250,141 


992,635 


2,769,806 


2,748,417.57 


21,388.43 


28.58 


44.55 


7.67 


19,668 


161,111 


485,796 


488,655.01 


2,859.01 


32.06 


47.98 


8.29 


963 


2,437 


7,178 


7,125.66 


52.34 


27.14 


41.09 


8.10 


3,684 


22,499 


72,868 


73,270.08 


402.08 


32.75 


47.39 


8.91 


1,946 


4,138 


13,273 


13,236.43 


36.57 


28.98 


42.11 


8.82 


6,523 


35,117 


99,919 


98,517.31 


1,401.69 


27.35 


42.17 


7.82 


68,433 


359,392 


974,715 


963,177.09 


11,537.91 


27.09 


42.92 


7.46 


3,748 


10,754 


33,825 


33,503.27 


321.73 


30.24 


44.34 


8.65 


3,933 


14,382 


45,504 


45,329.51 


174.49 


31.21 


45.63 


8.70 


1,178 


3,334 


12,517 


12,449.53 


67.47 


31.97 


43.58 


10.32 


1,942 


14,490 


44,502 


44,002.13 


499.87 


28.27 


41.93 


8.45 


83,140 


979,142 


3,008,111 


2,983,444.33 


24,666.67 


32.78 


48.60 


8.45 


1,267 


3,775 


10,344 


9,805.13 


538.87 


24.81 


39.08 


7.54 


5,753 


23,078 


69,860 


69,677.19 


182.81 


31.30 


46.75 


8.32 


1,682 


16,509 


79,919 


77,884.25 


2,034.75 


31.57 


39.79 


13.31 


873 


2,577 


8,508 


8,438.69 


69.31 


30.64 


43.97 


9.08 


3,580 


13,653 


38,862 


38,235.98 


626.02 


26.36 


40.64 


7.83 


6,113 


38,386 


103,806 


102,737.66 


1,068.34 


27.13 


43.06 


7.44 


4,049 


14,924 


44,561 


44,116.09 


444.91 


28.73 


43.20 


8.21 


21,040 


67,120 


183,101 


182,334.69 


766.31 


26.64 


42.07 


7.50 


1,925 


13,447 


44,317 


43,543.32 


773.68 


30.73 


44.13 


9.06 


2,743 


10,716 


32,556 


32,260.77 


295.23 


31.33 


46.70 


8.35 


1,236 


9,436 


25,820 


26,145.55 


325.55 


27.99 


44.11 


7.52 


1,832 


27,951 


87,793 


87,573.70 


219.30 


31.19 


45.77 


8.64 


107,037 


554,378 


1,583,791 


1,575,948.04 


7,842.96 


29.53 


45.44 


7.86 


1,440 


4,660 


14,210 


14,169.12 


40.88 


28.37 


42.22 


8.39 


8,090 


23,140 


64,334 


63,998.35 


335.65 


25.24 


39.43 


7.65 


6,621 


25,291 


78,395 


77,959.77 


435.23 


29.03 


42.86 


8.52 


5,488 


30,030 


94,028 


93,928.33 


99.67 


32.37 


47.57 


8.61 


2,173 


6,776 


20,719 


20,643.77 


75.23 


30.42 


45.20 


8.41 


11,963 


41,268 


121,563 


119,872.36 


1,690.64 


28.55 


43.23 


8.10 


2,240 


1 1 ,025 


32,288 


31,904.62 


383.38 


27.23 


41.36 


8.05 


38.018 


253,224 


700,876 


688,016.97 


12,859.03 


28.12 


44.04 


7.61 


6,139 


59,394 


156,154 


156,673.53 


519.53 


25.50 


41.16 


7.23 


3,760 


22,117 


64,951 


63,898.96 


1,052.04 


30.01 


45.52 


8.08 


3,062 


13,305 


40,083 


39,117.02 


965.98 


28.90 


43.26 


8.28 



112 



Appendix II — Finance 



STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION OF THE 

for the Year 



! 



Municipality 



Primary Power and 

Energy Supplied 

during Year 

(Principal Bases of 
Cost Allocation) 



Average of 

Monthly 

Peak Loads 



Energy 



Common 

Demand 

Costs 

(Note 1) 



Transformation 
and Metering 

(Note 2) 



Stage I 



Stage II 



SPECIAL 

Facili- 
ties 

(Note 3) 



Frequency 
Standardi- 
zation 

(Note 4) 



Collingwood 
Comber . . . 
Coniston . . . 
Cookstown . 
Cottam 

Courtright . 
Creemore . . 
Dashwood . 
Deep River . 
Delaware . . 

Delhi 

Deseronto . . 
Dorchester . 
Drayton . . . 
Dresden . . . 

Drumbo . . . 
Dryden .... 

Dublin 

Dundalk . . . 
Dundas .... 

Dunnville . . 
Durham . . . 
Dutton .... 
East York . . 
Eganville . . . 

Elmira .... 
Elmvale . . . 
Elmwood . . 

Elora 

Embro .... 

Embrun . . . 

Erieau 

Erie Beach . 

Erin 

Espanola . . . 

Essex 

Etobicoke . . 
Exeter .... 
Fergus .... 
Fenelon Falls 



kw 

12,231.3 

406.6 

1,508.8 

566.0 

348.8 

303.5 
681.7 
449.8 
4,987.4 
309.6 

3,165.0 

1,427.9 
615.1 
542.2 

2,732.5 

310.9 

5,096.2 

388.7 

965.2 

12,599.0 

4,731.7 

2,303.6 

446.4 

44,967.7 

889.8 

6,184.5 
994.5 
229.8 

1,198.1 
542.4 

1,117.5 

504.8 

102.9 

1,065.4 

3,743.7 

2,696.0 
276,362.2 
3,048.7 
7,528.7 
1,203.7 



megawatt- 
hours 

73,108.0 
1,979.2 
7,835.3 
2,960.1 
1,845.0 

1,550.4 
3,534.8 
2,265.2 
28,734.4 
1,501.2 

16,818.3 
7,644.0 
3,139.2 
2,778.8 

15,002.1 

1,512.7 

29,107.0 

1,700.0 

5,077.9 

69,830.1 

27,265.0 
11,484.0 

2,306.9 
265,025.3 

4,395.6 

33,939.3 
5,441.6 
1,032.6 
6,590.3 
2,976.0 

5,455.2 

2,697.6 

450.8 

5,728.0 

20,838.8 

15,538.6 

1,712,878.6 

17,085.9 

40,829.9 

5,897.5 



331,190 

11,008 

40,853 

15,325 

9,445 

8,218 

18,458 

12,179 

135,046 

8,384 

85,700 
38,664 
16,656 
14,682 
73,987 

8,419 

137,992 
10,524 
26,136 

341,148 

128,121 

62,374 

12,088 

1,217,600 

24,093 

167,459 

26,929 

6,221 

32,441 

14,686 

30,258 

13,667 

2,787 

28,848 

101,369 

73,000 

7,483,137 

82,549 

203,858 

32,593 



30,750 

1,008 

3,814 

1,403 

865 

752 

1,690 

1,115 

12,606 

768 

8,000 
3,540 
1,525 
1,344 
6,907 

771 

12,635 

964 

2,393 

31,846 

11,960 

5,711 

1,107 

113,664 

2,206 

15,632 

2,466 

570 

2,970 

1,345 

2,771 
1,252 
255 
2,693 
9,463 

6,814 

698,300 

7,589 

19,030 

3,042 



8,927 
1,056 

1,470 
906 

788 
1,771 
1,168 

804 



3,709 
1,598 
1,408 



808 

13,237 

1,010 

2,507 



5,983 
1,159 

2,311 



2,583 

597 

3,112 

1,409 

2,903 

1,311 

267 



13,638 
6,303 



74 



728 

2,285 

110 

2,587 

79 
5,084 

1,322 

17,856 

1,055 



988 



176,254 

233 

1,496 

529 



'See note 8, page 126. 



Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 



13 



COST OF PRIMARY POWER TO MUNICIPALITIES 

Ended December 31, 1968 















Total Cost 












Demand Cost 


Of 












(Note 7) 


Primary Power 




Energy @ 


Cost of 












Return 


2.75 Mills 


Primary 


AMOUNTS 


Balance 








on Equity 


perKwh 


Power 


Billed AT 


(Refunded 






Mills 


(Note 5) 


(Note 6) 


Allocated 


Interim Rates 


or Charged) 


$ per Kw 


$ per Kw 


per Kwh 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 








33,280 


201,047 


544,750 


541,172.67 


3,577.33 


28.09 


44.54 


7.45 


2.675 


5,443 


17.060 


17,065.88 


5.88 


28.57 


41.96 


8.62 


1,930 


21,547 


64,358 


63,625.69 


732.31 


28.37 


42.66 


8.21 


1,783 


8,140 


24,838 


24,423.47 


414.53 


29.50 


43.88 


8.39 


1,468 


5,074 


15,868 


15,663.58 


204.42 


30.94 


45.49 


8.60 


1,248 


4,264 


13,684 


13,552.35 


131.65 


31.04 


45.09 


8.83 


2,767 


9,721 


29,214 


29,069.43 


144.57 


28.59 


42.85 


8.26 


1,929 


6,229 


20,111 


20,100.80 


10.20 


30.86 


44.71 


8.88 


6,759 


79,020 


222,407 


221,737.20 


669.80 


28.74 


44.59 


7.74 


1,174 


4,128 


13,839 


13,745.85 


93.15 


31.36 


44.70 


9.22 


8,850 


46,250 


140,595 


138,683.44 


1,911.56 


29.80 


44.42 


8.36 


4,477 


21,021 


63,899 


64,100.23 


201.23 


30.02 


44.75 


8.36 


2,104 


8,633 


28,153 


27,862.75 


290.25 


31.73 


45.77 


8.97 


2,649 


7,642 


24,054 


23,874.29 


179.71 


30.26 


44.36 


8.66 


8,253 


41,256 


124,380 


124,854.77 


474. 77 


30.42 


45.52 


8.29 


1,549 


4,160 


13,652 


13,432.97 


219.03 


30.52 


43.91 


9.02 


9,277 


80,044 


237,218 


236,916.72 


301.28 


30.84 


46.55 


8.15 


1,338 


4,675 


17,001 


16,901.86 


99.14 


31.71 


43.74 


10.00 


3,470 


13,964 


42,092 


41,228.89 


863.11 


29.13 


43.61 


8.29 


37,979 


192,033 


569,928 


565,156.64 


4,771.36 


29.99 


45.24 


8.16 


19,537 


74,979 


211,040 


208,605.68 


2,434.32 


28.75 


44.60 


7.74 


8,016 


31,581 


98,785 


98,315.83 


469.17 


29.17 


42.88 


8.60 


3,432 


6,344 


18,605 


18,131.36 


473.64 


27.46 


41.68 


8.06 


153,098 


728,821 


2,059,745 


2,035,972.94 


23,772.06 


29.60 


45.80 


7.77 


1,425 


12,088 


39,718 


38,676.87 


1,041.13 


31.05 


44.64 


9.04 


20,596 


93,333 


275,437 


275,872.09 


435.09 


29.44 


44.54 


8.12 


3,351 


14,964 


44,088 


43,295.32 


792.68 


29.28 


44.33 


8.10 


1,189 


2,840 


9,154 


9,048.03 


105.97 


27.48 


39.83 


8.86 


6,565 


18,123 


53,675 


52,721.17 


953.83 


29.67 


44.80 


8.14 


2,353 


8,184 


24,898 


24,345.86 


552.14 


30.81 


45.90 


8.37 


1,277 


15,002 


50,216 


49,480.15 


735.85 


31.51 


44.94 


9.21 


2,428 


7,418 


22,734 


22,785.96 


51.96 


30.34 


45.04 


8.43 


428 


1,240 


4,430 


4,414.10 


15.90 


30.99 


43.05 


9.83 


1,787 


15,752 


46,039 


46,283.42 


244.42 


28.42 


43.21 


8.04 


3,592 


57,307 


165,535 


162,858.66 


2,676.34 


28.90 


44.22 


7.94 


9,392 


42,731 


121,241 


120,907.83 


333.17 


29.12 


44.97 


7.80 


565,772 


4,710,417 


13,345,060 


13,232,233.85 


112,826.15 


31.24 


48.29 


7.79 


12,111 


46,986 


140,695 


140,554.82 


140.18 


30.74 


46.15 


8.23 


20,138 


112,282 


339,114 


330,487.13 


8,626.87 


30.13 


45.04 


8.31 


128 


16,218 


52,856 


51,012.46 


1,843.54 


30.43 


43.91 


8.96 



114 



Appendix II — Finance 



STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION OF THE 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary Power and 

Energy Supplied 

during Year 

(Principal Bases of 
Cost Allocation) 



Average of 

Monthly 

Peak Loads 



Energy 



Common 

Demand 

Costs 

(Note 1) 



Transformation 
and Metering 

(Note 2) 



Stage 



Stage II 



Special 
Facili- 
ties 

(Note 3) 



Frequency 
Standardi- 
zation 

(Note 4) 



Finch 

Flesherton . . . 

Fonthill 

Forest 

Fort William . . 

Frankford .... 

Gait 

Georgetown . . 

Glencoe 

Gloucester Twp 

Goderich .... 
Grand Bend . . 
Grand Valley . 

Granton 

Gravenhurst . . 

Grimsby 

Guelph 

Hagersville . . . 
Hamilton .... 
Hanover 

Harriston .... 

Harrow 

Hastings 

Havelock .... 
Hawkesbury . . 

Hearst 

Hensall 

Hespeler 

Highgate 

Holstein 

Huntsville .... 

Ingersoll 

Iroquois 

Jarvis 

Kapuskasing . . 

Kemptville . . . 

Kenora 

Killaloe Station 
Kincardine . . . 
King City 



lew 

338.0 

590.9 

1,653.9 

1,972.8 

42,686.5 

1,232.1 

38,731.3 

14,071.5 

967.0 

22,628.7 

7,967.9 
990.6 
711.7 
188.2 

3,159.2 

4,399.6 

66,025.0 

2,493.7 

545,037.4 

6,627.4 

1,798.2 

2,097.1 

729.2 

828.1 

6,605.5 

3,688.6 

1,144.2 

7,980.5 

297.4 

146.3 

3,552.7 
7,545.0 
1,169.8 
462.3 
5,247.1 

2,675.9 
9,197.2 
446.6 
2,815.6 
1,482.7 



megawatt- 
hours 

1,601.6 

2,987.4 

9,049.6 

11,348.4 

258,335.7 

6,598.0 

219,655.0 

76,760.7 

4,854.4 
137,385.5 

45,164.1 

5,092.3 

3,416.4 

899.8 

17,075.7 

25,111.0 

392,542.4 

11,724.4 

3,677,694.3 

32,010.4 

10,334.0 

11,167.6 

4,112.0 

4,408.8 

36,106.7 

16,830.9 
5,481.6 

40,474.5 

1,190.0 

692.8 

20,812.2 

40,673.0 

6,294.9 

2,329.4 

28,329.7 

14,703.2 
52,675.7 

2,335.8 
15,701.8 

7,946.2 



9,153 

16,000 

44,782 

53,418 

1,155,836 

33,362 

1,048,738 

381,018 

26,183 

612,724 

215,748 

26,823 

19,271 

5,097 

85,542 

119,128 

1,787,777 

67,523 

14,758,134 

179,454 

48,691 
56,785 
19,745 
22,423 
178,858 

99,877 

30,983 

216,090 

8,054 

3,961 

96,197 

204,298 

31,675 

12,517 

142,077 

72,455 
249,036 
12,092 
76,237 
40,146 



838 

1,465 

4,101 

4,891 

107,898 

3,055 
97,870 
35,568 

2,398 
36,432 

20,140 

2,456 

1,765 

467 

7,859 

10,908 

159,800 

6,202 

1,338,488 

16,619 

4,545 
5,215 
1,808 
2,093 
16,696 

9,323 

2,837 

20,172 

737 

363 

8,980 

19,072 

2,900 

1,146 

13,263 

6,634 
445 
1,129 
7,059 
3,676 



878 
1,535 
4,296 
5,124 



3,200 



2,512 
36,559 



2,573 

1,849 

489 

6,835 

11,427 
2,744 
5,434 

7,178 



4,608 
1,894 



2,972 

772 
380 



3,038 
1,201 



6,950 



3,108 
3,851 



22 



3,021 
46 



123 



95 

422 

96 

1,657 

678 

354 
442 



784 
578 



3,864 

910 
440 

2,812 



169 

295 

4,962 

5,918 



616 

116,194 

42,214 

2,901 

11,314 

23,904 

2,972 

356 

564 

1,580 

13,199 

198,074 

7,481 

1,470,865 

3,314 

5,395 

6,291 

365 

414 

3,303 



3,433 

23,942 

892 

73 

1,776 

22,635 

585 

1,387 



1,338 

223 
1,408 
4,448 



Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 

COST OF PRIMARY POWER TO MUNICIPALITIES 
Ended December 31, 1968 



115 















Total Cost 












Demand Cost 


Of 




Energy @ 


Cost of 






(Note 7) 


Primary Power 










Return 


2.75 Mills 


Primary 


AMOUNTS 


Balance 








on Equity 


perKwh 


Power 


Billed at 


(Refunded 






Mais 


(Note 5) 


(Note 6) 


Allocated 


Interim Rates 


or Charged) 


$ per Kw 


$ per Kw 


per Kwh 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 








1,511 


4,404 


13,931 


13,746.01 


184.99 


28.18 


41.21 


8.70 


1,764 


8,215 


25,768 


24,922.07 


845.93 


29.70 


43.61 


8.63 


4,568 


24,886 


78,459 


78,502.58 


43.58 


32.39 


47.44 


8.67 


9,134 


31,208 


91,513 


91,282.36 


230.64 


30.56 


46.39 


8.06 


192,259 


710,423 


1,781,898 


1,772,030.66 


9,867.34 


25.10 


41.74 


6.90 


2,226 


18,145 


56,152 


55,720.44 


431.56 


30.84 


45.57 


8.51 


133,938 


604,051 


1,732,915 


1,714,128.21 


18,786.79 


29.14 


44.74 


7.89 


33.687 


211,092 


639,226 


631,636.55 


7,589.45 


30.42 


45.43 


8.32 


4,301 


13,350 


43,089 


42,940.74 


148.26 


30.75 


44.56 


8.88 


23,106 


377,810 


1,051,733 


1,031,150.81 


20,582.19 


29.78 


46.48 


7.66 


31,211 


124,201 


352,782 


351,082.47 


1,699.53 


28.68 


44.28 


7.81 


3,209 


14,004 


45,742 


45,948.89 


206.89 


32.03 


46.18 


8.98 


3,016 


9,395 


29,620 


29,035.55 


584.45 


28.41 


41.62 


8.67 


1,146 


2,474 


7,945 


7,769.64 


175.36 


29.06 


42.22 


8.83 


12,634 


46,958 


136,235 


136,671.41 


436.41 


28.25 


43.12 


7.98 


10,519 


69,055 


213,620 


214,547.61 


927.61 


32.86 


48.55 


8.51 


174,702 


1,079,492 


3,053,281 


3,029,667.25 


23,613.75 


29.88 


46.24 


7.78 


13,302 


32,242 


107,237 


108,769.49 


1,532.49 


30.07 


43.00 


9.15 


1,703,282 


10,086,160 


25,950,365 


25,784,319.24 


166,045.76 


29.10 


47.61 


7.08 


20,831 


88,029 


274,441 


272,209.07 


2,231.93 


28.12 


41.41 


8.57 


7,950 


28,419 


79,454 


78,905.78 


548.22 


28.38 


44.19 


7.69 


8,251 


30,711 


9,5,801 


96,896.23 


1,095.23 


31.04 


45.68 


8.58 


2,128 


11,308 


32,992 


32,763.58 


228.42 


29.73 


45.24 


8.02 


3,345 


12,124 


33,709 


33,217.86 


491.14 


26.06 


40.71 


7.65 


8.173 


99,293 


289,977 


287,908.90 


2,068.10 


28.86 


43.90 


8.03 


5,324 


46,285 


150,945 


148,165.85 


2,779.15 


28.37 


40.92 


8.97 


4,484 


15,074 


50,815 


50,808.72 


6.28 


31.23 


44.41 


9.27 


32,472 


111,305 


339,615 


337,863.95 


1,751.05 


28.60 


42.56 


8.39 


1,625 


3,273 


12,103 


11,771.44 


331.56 


29.69 


40.70 


10.17 


641 


1,905 


6,041 


6,050.06 


9.06 


28.27 


41.29 


8.72 


16,115 


57,234 


148,072 


144,734.27 


3,337.73 


25.56 


41.68 


7.11 


37,311 


111,851 


324,409 


321,892.64 


2,516.36 


28.16 


43.00 


7.98 


3,061 


17,311 


52,448 


52,473.95 


25.95 


30.03 


44.84 


8.33 


3,042 


6,406 


19,615 


19,392.99 


222.01 


28.57 


42.43 


8.42 


8,973 


77,907 


225,184 


224,145.34 


1,038.66 


28.06 


42.92 


7.95 


8,071 


40,434 


120,180 


119,542.39 


637.61 


29.79 


44.91 


8.17 


1,057 


144,858 


393,282 


393,289.29 


7.29 


27.01 


42.76 


7.47 


841 


6,423 


19,026 


18,806.49 


219.51 


28.22 


42.60 


8.15 


13,267 


43,180 


120,537 


119,464.45 


1,072.55 


27.47 


42.81 


7.68 


1,999 


21,852 


71,974 


72,036.06 


62.06 


33.80 


48.54 


9.06 



















116 



Appendix II — Finance 



STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION OF THE 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary Power and 

Energy Supplied 

during Year 

(Principal Bases of 
Cost Allocation) 



Average of 

Monthly 

Peak Loads 



Energy 



Common 

Demand 

Costs 

(Note 1) 



Transformation 
and Metering 

(Note 2) 



Stage I 



Stage II 



SPECIAL 
FACILI- 
TIES 

(Note 3) 



Frequency 
Standardi- 
zation 

(Note 4) 



Kingston 
Kingsville . . . 

Kirkfield 

Kitchener . . . 
Lakefield . . . 

Lambeth 

Lanark 

Lancaster . . . 
Larder Lake . 
Latch ford . . . 

Leamington . 
Lindsay 
Listowel 
London . . . . 
L'Orignal . . . 

Lucan 

Lucknow . . . 

Lynden 

Madoc 

Magnctawan . 

Markdale . . . 
Markham . . . 
Marmora 
Martintown . 
Massey 

Maxville 
McGarry Twp. 
Meaford 

Merlin 

Merrickville . 

Midland 
Mildmay 
Millbrook . . . 

Milton 

Milverton . . . 

Mississauga . . 
Mitchell 
Moorefield . . 
Morrisburg . . 
Mount Brydge 



kw 

55,524.7 

2,894.3 

146.8 

117,202.9 

2,029.0 

1,534.7 
652.1 
435.1 
931.0 
276.7 

9,287.5 

14,956.7 

4,979.8 

183,058.9 

893.9 

812.5 
1,086.7 

469.5 
1,285.7 

139.1 

1,061.8 

7,467.0 

1,017.8 

181.1 

793.1 

780.4 
900.5 
4,251.5 
473.9 
774.2 

11,969.0 
569.4 
615.1 

6,542.7 
1,198.5 

150,211.5 

2,949.2 

411.2 

1,745.5 

620.1 



megawatt- 
hours 

334,355.0 

15,998.7 

690.0 

662,517.0 
11,568.0 

7,812.9 

2,887.4 
2,362.5 
5,417.2 
1,495.7 

55,586.9 

90,990.0 

26,682.6 

,078,989.9 

4,751.7 

4,317.6 

5,344.0 

2,455.6 

6,842.4 

708.8 

5,781.5 

40,545.7 

5,414.4 

894.8 

4,460.7 

3,716.4 
4,787.0 
23,037.7 
2,535.2 
3,979.8 

69,003.4 
3,532.9 
3,337.4 

38,247.2 
5,591.6 

976,565.9 

14,803.8 

1,894.8 

9,579.6 

3,270.8 



1,503,460 

78,371 

3,974 

3,173,537 
54,939 

41,561 
17,658 
11,781 
25,209 
7,493 

251,481 

404,986 

134,839 

4,956,737 

24,204 

21,999 

29,426 

12,713 

34,812 

3,768 

28,751 

202,186 

27,559 

4,904 

21,476 

21,131 
24,384 
115,118 
12,832 
20,963 

324,087 
15,419 
16.656 

177,158 
32,452 

4,067,320 
79,857 
11,134 
47,263 
16,790 



140,348 

7,206 

364 

5,666 

5,031 

3,805 
1,617 
1,079 
2,308 
699 

23,413 

37,806 

12,588 

462,713 

2,216 

2,014 
2,694 
1,164 
3,188 

352 

2,633 

18,552 

2,523 

449 

2,004 

1,935 
2,233 
10,638 
1,175 
1,919 

30,254 
1,412 
1,525 

16,524 
2,971 

379,504 
7,455 
1,020 
4,328 
1,537 



5,916 
381 

5,270 

3,986 
1,694 
1,130 
2,418 



3,377 



2,322 

2,110 

2,823 
1,219 
3,339 



2,758 

17,319 

2,644 

470 



2,027 
2,339 
5,842 
1,231 
2,011 



1,479 

1,598 

782 

3,113 

9,754 

1,068 
4,534 
1,611 



$ 
2,080 



34 



616 



2,520 

5,149 

235 



75 



6,510 
658 



1,748 



858 



1,434 
65 

66,954 
2,771 

1,025 



27,762 

8,683 

73 

351,609 

1,015 

4,604 
326 

218 



27,862 

7,478 

14,939 

549,176 

447 

2,438 
543 

1,409 
643 

70 

531 

22,400 

509 

91 



390 

2,126 

1,422 

387 

5,985 

285 

308 

19,627 

3,596 

450,635 

8,848 

1,234 

873 

1,860 






Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 



117 



COST OF PRIMARY POWER TO MUNICIPALITIES 

Ended December 31, 1968 















Total Cost 












Demand Cost 


Of 




Energy @ 


Cost of 






(Note 7) 


Primary Power 










return 


2.75 Mills 


Primary 


AMOUNTS 


Balance 








on Equity 


perKwh 


Power 


Billed at 


(Refunded 






Mau 


(Note 5) 


(Note 6) 


Allocated 


Interim Rates 


or Charged) 


$ per Kw 


$ per Kw 


per Kwh 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 








156,117 


919,476 


2,434,929 


2,406,837.67 


28,091.33 


27.29 


43.85 


7.28 


10,990 


43,996 


135,262 


135,900.87 


638.87 


31.52 


46.73 


8.45 


655 


1,898 


6,035 


5,963.94 


71.06 


28.19 


41.11 


8.75 


347,830 


1,821,923 


5,004,905 


4,962,488.15 


42,416.85 


27.15 


42.70 


7.55 


6,442 


31,812 


91,625 


91,156.99 


468.01 


29.48 


45.16 


7.92 


4,076 


21,485 


71,399 


71,336.46 


62.54 


32.51 


46.52 


9.14 


1,927 


7,940 


27,308 


27,221.93 


86.07 


29.69 


41.88 


9.46 


1,515 


6,497 


19,190 


18,843.48 


346.52 


29.17 


44.10 


8.12 


2,618 


14,897 


42,830 


42,644.48 


185.52 


30.00 


46.00 


7.91 


454 


4,113 


11,851 


11,630.99 


220.01 


27.96 


42.83 


7.92 


31,973 


152,864 


429,544 


429,974.65 


430.65 


29.78 


46.25 


7.73 


45,014 


250,223 


660,628 


650,167.55 


10,460.45 


27.43 


44.17 


7.26 


19,764 


73,377 


216,214 


213,163.21 


3,050.79 


28.68 


43.42 


8.10 


557,754 


2,967,222 


8,378,094 


8,310,290.37 


67,803.63 


29.55 


45.77 


7.76 


1,149 


13,067 


41,107 


41,310.02 


203.02 


31.36 


45.99 


8.65 


3,650 


11,873 


36,784 


36,548.73 


235.27 


30.66 


45.27 


8.52 


5,409 


14,696 


44,848 


44,776.02 


71.98 


27.74 


41.27 


8.39 


2,011 


6,753 


21,247 


21,325.20 


78.20 


30.87 


45.25 


8.65 


4,338 


18,817 


56,461 


56,142.50 


318.50 


29.28 


43.91 


8.25 


309 


1,949 


5,830 


5,780.41 


49.59 


27.88 


41.91 


8.23 


3,443 


15,899 


47,129 


46,708.29 


420.71 


29.41 


44.39 


8.15 


11,488 


111,501 


366,980 


358,915.19 


8,064.81 


34.21 


49.15 


9.05 


3,176 


14,890 


45,607 


45,804.73 


197.73 


30.18 


44.81 


8.42 


735 


2,461 


7,640 


7,592.43 


47.57 


28.59 


42.19 


8.54 


1,197 


12,267 


34,550 


34,054.33 


495.67 


28.09 


43.56 


7.75 


2,737 


10,220 


32,966 


32,821.62 


144.38 


29.14 


42.24 


8.87 


2,638 


13,164 


39,482 


39,363.84 


118.16 


29.22 


43.84 


8.25 


13,567 


63,354 


185,259 


183,184.03 


2,074.97 


28.67 


43.57 


8.04 


2,191 


6,972 


21,441 


21,503.05 


62.05 


30.53 


45.24 


8.46 


1,483 


10,944 


34,741 


34,446.53 


294.47 


30.73 


44.87 


8.73 


48,051 


189,759 


502,892 


491,581.54 


11,310.46 


26.16 


42.02 


7.29 


2,204 


9,715 


26,106 


25,817.35 


288.65 


28.78 


45.85 


7.39 


1,780 


9,178 


27,485 


27,355.48 


129.52 


29.76 


44.68 


8.24 


22,461 


105,180 


298,244 


294,147.64 


4,096.36 


29.51 


45.58 


7.80 


6,906 


15,377 


50,668 


50,621.13 


46.87 


29.44 


42.28 


9.06 


190,947 


2,685,556 


7,468,776 


7,379,039.55 


89,736.45 


31.84 


49.72 


7.65 


10,755 


40,710 


128,886 


128,997.67 


111.67 


29.89 


43.70 


8.71 


1,472 


5,211 


18,195 


18,475.18 


280.18 


31.57 


44.25 


9.60 


4,891 


26,344 


79,476 


79,241.03 


234.97 


30.44 


45.53 


8.30 


1,974 


8,995 


28,819 


28,476.96 


342.04 


31.97 


46.47 


8.81 



118 



Appendix 11 — Finance 



STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION OF THE 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary Power and 

Energy Supplied 

during Year 

(Principal Bases of 
Cost Allocation) 



Average of 

Monthly 

Peak Loads 



Energy 



Common 

Demand 

Costs 

(Note 1) 



Transformation 
and Metering 

(Note 2) 



Stage I 



Stage II 



Special 
Facili- 
ties 

(Note 3) 



Frequency 
Standardi- 
zation 

(Note 4) 



Mount Forest , 

Napanee 

Nepean Twp 

Neustadt 

Newboro 

Newburgh 

Newbury 

Newcastle 

New Hamburg 

Newmarket 

Niagara 

Niagara Falls 

Nipigon Twp 

North Bay 

North York 

Norwich 

Norwood 

Oakville 

Oil Springs 

Omemee 

Orangeville 

Orillia 

Orono 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Otterville 

Owen Sound 

Paisley 

Palmerston 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke 

Penetanguishene .... 
Perth 

Peterborough 

Petrolia 

Petrolia Waterworks 

Pickering 

Picton 



kw 

2,902.1 

4,172.2 

48,244.4 

464.4 

197.5 

366.8 

300.4 

1,380.6 

2,278.0 

9,420.4 

2,144.4 

45,738.5 

1,835.4 

38,300.2 

365,191.9 

1,011.7 

833.7 

92,782.2 

406.5 

626.7 

5,567.9 

13,542.8 

854.0 

111,057.0 

284,332.2 

455.8 

19,556.3 

641.5 

1,482.0 

5,260.2 

1,144.5 
4,273.5 
4,642.1 
4,001.9 
5,653.8 

61,347.6 

2,988.0 

131.2 

1,261.4 

4,588.9 



megawatt- 
hours 

15,552.2 

21,787.5 

282,380.6 

1,989.2 

1,027.5 

1,820.9 

1,279.8 

7,631.8 

12,257.3 

53,688.8 

12,249.1 
279,481.8 

11,171.8 

232,583.5 

2,160,218.3 

5,718.9 
4,393.6 
640,774.8 
2,467.2 
3,157.9 

31,822.7 

69,902.5 

4,676.6 

654,221.8 

,695,584.5 

2,424.4 

118,860.4 

3,326.6 

8,124.7 

28,020.9 

5,632.0 
26,119.6 
14,685.6 
23,839.4 
31,036.4 

372,126.2 

15,138.1 

906.5 

7,073.8 

25,508.2 



$ 

78,581 

112,972 

1,306,328 

12,575 

5,347 

9,932 

8,136 

37,384 

61,682 

255,079 

58,065 
1,238,475 

49,698 
1,037,065 
9,888,405 

27,394 
22,574 
2,512,291 
11,007 
16,968 

150,763 

366,702 

23,125 

3,007,122 

7,698,948 

12,342 

529,532 

17,371 

40,129 

142,431 

30,990 
115,717 
125,696 
108,360 
153,088 

1,661,127 

80,906 

3,552 

34,155 

124,254 



$ 

7,299 

10,450 

85,541 

1,151 

490 

909 

745 

3,490 

5,664 

23,578 

5,421 
115,612 

4,551 

96,810 

914,652 

2,508 
2,067 
234,331 
1,008 
1,554 

13,988 

34,223 

2,117 

280,716 

610,215 

1,130 

49,164 

1,621 

3,746 

13,296 

2,838 
10,802 
11,733 
10,115 
14,291 

155,067 

7,436 

325 

3,127 

11,599 



$ 

1,945 

5,126 

60,149 

1,206 

513 

953 
780 

5,041 
12,552 



4,767 



2,628 
2,165 
10,362 
1,056 
1,628 

4,642 

457 

2,218 



738 



1,184 
14,426 



2,973 



6,263 
341 

3,276 



523 
592 



746 
4,962 

1,290 
27,617 

4,443 



857 
45,170 



1,236 
11,113 



669 
1,281 



455 

10,858 

1,168 



477 



211 



$ 

1,451 

2,086 

24,122 

232 

99 

183 

901 

690 

6,834 

28,261 

6,433 
137,216 



1,095,576 

3,035 

417 

278,347 

1,220 

313 

2,784 

6,771 

427 

55,529 

142,165 

1,367 

9,778 

321 

4,446 

15,781 

3,434 
2,137 
2,321 
2,001 
2,827 

30,674 

8,964 

394 

631 

2,294 



*See note 8, page 126. 



Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 



119 



COST OF PRIMARY POWER TO MUNICIPALITIES 
Ended December 31, 1968 



3- 

3,451 

2,001 















Total cost 












Demand Cost 


Of 












(Note 7) 


Primary Power 




Energy @ 


Cost of 












RETURN 


2.75 Mills 


Primary 


AMOUNTS 


Balance 








on Equity 


perKwh 


Power 


Billed at 


(Refunded 






Mills 


(Note 5) 


(Note 6) 


Allocated 


Interim Rates 


or Charged) 


$ per Kw 


$ per Kw 


per Kwh 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 








9,878 


42,769 


122,690 


119,800.82 


2,889.18 


27.54 


42.28 


7.89 


17,931 


59,916 


173,211 


172,531.81 


679.19 


27.15 


41.52 


7.95 


36,826 


776,547 


2,215,861 


2,085,791.83 


130,069.17 


27.84 


43.93 


7.51 


1,580 


5,470 


19,054 


19,325.84 


271.84 


29.25 


41.03 


9.58 


334 


2,826 


8,941 


8,883.01 


57.99 


30.96 


45.27 


8.70 


831 


5,007 


16,153 


16,130.98 


22.02 


30.38 


44.04 


8.87 


908 


3,519 


13,173 


13,395.86 


222.86 


32.13 


43.85 


10.29 


3,419 


20,987 


59,132 


58,376.84 


755.16 


27.62 


42.83 


7.75 


9,470 


33,708 


104,205 


103,150.30 


1,054.70 


30.94 


45.74 


8.50 


20,545 


147,644 


451,531 


449,857.78 


1,673.22 


32.25 


47.93 


8.41 


9,305 


33,685 


95,589 


93,555.25 


2,033.75 


28.86 


44.58 


7.80 


166,158 


768,575 


2,121,337 


2,097,057.73 


24,279.27 


29.57 


46.38 


7.59 


5,524 


30,722 


84,214 


84,649.46 


435.46 


29.14 


45.88 


7.54 


97,928 


639,605 


1,679,995 


1,658,086.11 


21,908.89 


27.16 


43.86 


7.22 


522,403 


5,940,600 


17,316,830 


17,146,825.82 


170,004.18 


31.15 


47.42 


8.02 


6,341 


15,727 


45,808 


44,934.66 


873.34 


29.74 


45.28 


8.01 


2,856 


12,082 


36,449 


36,155.26 


293.74 


29.22 


43.72 


8.30 


122,061 


1,762.131 


4,720,571 


4,705,418.27 


15,152.73 


31.88 


50.88 


7.37 


3,170 


6,785 


17,906 


17,665.01 


240.99 


27.35 


44.04 


7.26 


1,821 


8,684 


27,326 


27,354.91 


28.91 


29.74 


43.60 


8.65 


16,023 


87,512 


244,902 


243,758.57 


1,143.43 


28.25 


43.98 


7.70 


1 7,456 


192,232 


594,042 


576,382.12 


17,659.88 


29.66 


43.86 


8.50 


1,895 


12,861 


38,853 


38,735.00 


118.00 


30.43 


45.50 


8.31 


284,139 


1,799,110 


4,858,338 


4,779,629.27 


78,708.73 


27.54 


43.75 


7.43 


499,907 


4,662,858 


12,615,017 


12,356,340.43 


258,676.57 


27.96 


44.37 


7.44 


2,139 


6,667 


20,551 


20,314.91 


236.09 


30.46 


45.09 


8.48 


66,532 


326,866 


863,234 


853,486.94 


9,747.06 


27.42 


44.14 


7.26 


2,887 


9,148 


25,574 


24,626.88 


947.12 


25.60 


39.87 


7.69 


8,307 


22,343 


63,026 


61,883.32 


1,142.68 


27.44 


42.53 


7.76 


22,705 


77,057 


227,141 


224,859.81 


2,281.19 


28.52 


43.18 


8.11 


5,029 


15,488 


50,694 


50,353.25 


340.75 


30.76 


44.29 


9.00 


7,278 


71,829 


193,662 


190,025.83 


3,636.17 


28.51 


45.32 


7.41 


749 


40,385 


190,244 


170,319.48 


19,924.52 


29.78 


38.48 


12.16 


14,042 


65,558 


173,160 


168,394.14 


4,765.86 


26.88 


43.27 


7.26 


22,318 


85,350 


233,238 


231,115.65 


2,122.35 


26.15 


41.25 


7.51 


1 76,035 


1,023,347 


2,694,180 


2,654,240.41 


39,939.59 


27.23 


43.92 


7.24 


16,341 


41,630 


129,335 


129,433.36 


98.36 


29.35 


43.28 


8.54 




2,493 


7,105 


7,173.70 


68.70 


35.15 


54.15 


7.84 


1,667 


19,453 


58,975 


58,856.76 


118.24 


31.33 


46.75 


8.34 


19,837 


70,148 


188,669 


186,686.47 


1,982.53 


25.83 


41.11 


7.40 



120 



Appendix 11 — Finance 



STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION OF THE 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary Power and 

Energy Supplied 

during Year 

(Principal Bases of 
Cost Allocation) 



Average of 

Monthly 

Peak Loads 



Energy 



Common 

Demand 

Costs 

(Note 1) 



Transformation 
and Metering 

(Note 2) 



Stage I 



Stage II 



Special 
Facili- 
ties 

(Note 3) 



Frequency 
Standardi- 
zation 

(Note 4) 



Plantagenet 

Plattsville 

Point Edward .... 

Port Arthur 

Port Burwell 

Port Colborne .... 

Port Credit 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope ... 

Port McNicoll 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan 

Port Stanley 

Prescott 

Preston 

Priceville 

Princeton 

Queenston 

Rainy River 

Red Rock 

Renfrew 

Richmond 

Richmond Hill . . . 
Ridgetown 

Ripley 

Rockland 

Rockwood 

Rodney 

Rosseau 

Russell 

St. Catharines 

St. Clair Beach . . . 

St. George 

St. Jacobs 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Sandwich West Twp 

Sarnia 

Scarborough 



kw 

782.2 

955.4 

6,605.8 

52,547.5 
332.4 

12,055.5 

16,929.5 

2,290.5 

2,440.1 

10,132.4 

1,175.7 
2,548.7 
428.8 
1,279.9 
4,898.4 

14,253.4 

76.6 

377.2 

418.3 

914.5 

1,016.5 

6,387.5 

1,242.9 

15,730.5 

2,252.6 

474.0 
1,821.1 
692.2 
662.0 
186.7 

511.0 

127,604.4 

1,034.3 

720.0 

883.0 

4,457.5 
24,377.7 

4,535.8 

51,551.6 

245,705.2 



megawatt- 
hours 

4,106.2 

4,340.8 

32,601.1 

290,220.1 

1,833.2 

75,995.4 
124,422.5 
13,164.6 
14,035.2 
56,023.2 

5,480.5 

14,225.4 

2,281.6 

7,148.4 

26,765.0 

81,000.3 

344.2 

1,914.0 

2,273.6 

5,067.6 

5,568.9 
32,218.4 

7,017.0 
93,516.0 
11,660.9 

2,434.0 
9,498.9 
3,517.1 
3,565.6 
911.7 

2,576.8 
770,112.4 
5,592.6 
3,583.2 
4,563.6 

24,301.1 
138,430.7 

24,382.2 

347,168.8 

1,447,017.0 



21,181 

25,870 

178,869 

1,422,843 

9,000 

326,431 

458,405 

62,021 

66,072 

274,359 

31,835 
69,011 
11,610 
34,656 
132,636 

385,945 

2,074 

10,214 

11,327 

24,763 

27,524 
172,957 

33,655 
425,940 

60,994 

12,835 
49,311 
18,744 
17,926 
5,055 

13,837 
3,455,180 
28,007 
19,495 
23,908 

120,695 

660,082 

122,817 

1,395,878 

6,653,032 



1,939 

2,369 

16,626 

132,823 

824 

30,473 

42,792 

5,790 

6,050 

25,612 

2,915 
6,411 
1,063 
3,173 
12,286 

35,339 
190 

935 
1,037 

2,267 

2,569 
16,146 

3,082 
39,761 

5,662 

1,175 
4,515 
1,716 
1,641 

472 

1,267 
322,524 
2,564 
1,785 
2,189 

11,267 

61,608 

11,358 

130,234 

620,743 



2,032 
2,482 
3,809 

863 



6,338 



3,054 
1,655 
1,114 
3,324 
5,128 

689 
199 

980 
1,086 

2,375 



3,228 
1,714 

1,231 

4,730 
1,798 
1,719 



1,327 
994 
2,686 
1,870 
2,293 



570 
5,785 

9,573 



179 
33 

1,801 
4,220 
1,861 
54 
2,978 

879 
644 

2,123 
413 



152 
431 



4,380 
1,222 



377 



2,984 
172,649 



391 

2,866 

19,817 

997 

36,167 

50,789 

6,872 

1,220 

5,066 

588 
1,274 
1,286 
3,840 
2,449 

42,760 

38 

1,132 

1,255 



3,194 

621 

47,192 

6,758 

237 

911 

2,077 

1,986 

93 

256 

382,813 

3,103 

2,160 

2,649 

13,372 

73,133 

13,607 

154,655 

737,116 



*See note 8, page 126. 



Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 



121 



COST OF PRIMARY POWER TO MUNICIPALITIES 

Ended December 31, 1968 















Total Cost 












Demand Cost 


Of 




Energy @ 


Cost of 






(Note 7) 


Primary Power 








Return 


2.75 Mills 


Primary 


AMOUNTS 


Balance 








on Equity 


perKwh 


Power 


Billed at 


(Refunded 






Mais 


(Note 5) 


(Note 6) 


Allocated 


Interim Rates 


or Charged) 


$ per Kw 


$ per Kw 


per Kwh 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 








1,031 


11,292 


35,804 


35,998.12 


194.12 


31.33 


45.77 


8.72 


3,019 


11,937 


42,505 


42,341.52 


163.48 


31.99 


44.49 


9.79 


22,382 


89,653 


286,392 


289,225.68 


2,833.68 


29.78 


43.35 


8.78 


320,164 


798,105 


2,033,786 


2,004,762.28 


29,023.72 


23.51 


38.70 


7.01 


1,219 


5,041 


15,539 


15,487.14 


51.86 


31.58 


46.75 


8.48 


39,375 


208,987 


564,484 


561,456.10 


3,027.90 


29.48 


46.82 


7.43 


35,230 


342,162 


863,138 


859,976.15 


3,161.85 


30.77 


50.98 


6.94 


9,776 


36,203 


102,971 


101,822.96 


1,148.04 


29.14 


44.96 


7.82 


7,177 


38,597 


111,154 


110,851.23 


302.77 


29.73 


45.55 


7.92 


34,759 


154,064 


427,320 


420,355.38 


6,964.62 


26.96 


42.17 


7.63 


4,310 


15,071 


50,032 


49,701.46 


330.54 


29.73 


42.56 


9.13 


6,752 


39,120 


111,363 


108,150.10 


3,212.90 


28.34 


43.69 


7.83 


1,944 


6,274 


19,403 


19,418.01 


15.01 


30.62 


45.25 


8.50 


8,189 


19,658 


58,585 


57,775.92 


809.08 


30.41 


45.77 


8.20 


16,859 


73,604 


209,657 


210,075.77 


418.77 


27.77 


42.80 


7.83 


52,965 


222,751 


634,519 


630,047.96 


4,471.04 


28.88 


44.52 


7.83 


279 


947 


3,169 


3,162.23 


6.77 


29.01 


41.37 


9.21 


2,005 


5,264 


16,520 


16,215.37 


304.63 


29.83 


43.80 


8.63 


1,797 


6,252 


19,160 


19,241.94 


81.94 


30.85 


45.80 


8.43 


1,320 


13,936 


42,173 


41,868.83 


304.17 


30.88 


46.12 


8.32 


2,441 


15,314 


43,397 


43,571.90 


174.90 


27.62 


42.69 


7.79 


12,824 


88,601 


268,074 


262,763.60 


5,310.40 


28.09 


41.97 


8.32 


2,214 


19,297 


57,669 


55,914.07 


1,754.93 


30.87 


46.40 


8.22 


26,989 


257,169 


747,453 


739,979.30 


7,473.70 


31.16 


47.52 


7.99 


9,144 


32,067 


99,273 


98,465.42 


807.58 


29.82 


44.07 


8.51 


2,109 


6,694 


20,063 


20,075.73 


12.73 


28.20 


42.33 


8.24 


2,900 


26,122 


82,689 


82,240.52 


448.48 


31.06 


45.41 


8.71 


2,473 


9,672 


31,534 


31,073.83 


460.17 


31.58 


45.56 


8.97 


3,223 


9,805 


29,854 


30,180.97 


326.97 


30.28 


45.10 


8.37 


886 


2,507 


7,241 


7,244.84 


3.84 


25.35 


38.78 


7.94 


1,642 


7,086 


22,131 


21,844.43 


286.57 


29.44 


43.31 


8.59 


364,915 


2,117,809 


5,914,782 


5,886,937.26 


27,844.74 


29.75 


46.35 


7.68 


\ 2,557 


15,380 


49,183 


48,381.19 


801.81 


32.68 


47.55 


8.79 


2.989 


9,854 


32,175 


31,917.86 


257.14 


31.00 


44.69 


8.97 


3,819 


12,550 


39,770 


39,572.52 


197.48 


30.82 


45.04 


8.71 


jo.015 


66,828 


176,147 


176,212.82 


65.82 


24.52 


39.52 


7.25 


98,059 


380,684 


1,078,018 


1,067,255.63 


10,762.37 


28.60 


44.22 


7.79 


i \ 7,480 


67,051 


216,122 


211,690.17 


4,431.83 


32.86 


47.65 


8.86 


307,515 


954,714 


2,327,966 


2,281,642.93 


46,323.07 


26.63 


45.16 


6.71 


390,290 


3,979,297 


11,782,120 


11,644,132.92 


137,987.08 


31.75 


47.95 


8.14 



122 



Appendix II — Finance 



STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION OF THE 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary Power and 

Energy Supplied 

during Year 

(Principal Bases of 
Cost Allocation) 



Average of 

Monthly 

Peak Loads 



Energy 



Common 

Demand 

Costs 

(Note 1) 



Transformation 
and Metering 

(Note 2) 



Stage 



Stage II 



SPECIAL 

Facili- 
ties 

(Note 3) 



Schreiber Twp 

Seaforth 

Shelburne 

Simcoe 

Sioux Lookout 

Smiths Falls 

Southampton 

South Grimsby Twp 

South River 

Springfield 

Stayner 

Stirling 

Stoney Creek 

Stouffvillc 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Streetsville 

Sturgeon Falls 

Sudbury 

Sunderland 

Sundridge 

Sutton 

Tara 

Tavistock 

Tecumseh 

Teeswater 

Terrace Bay Twp. . . 

Thamesford 

Thamesville 

Thedford 

Thessalon 

Thornbury 

Thorndale 

Thornton 

Thorold 

Tilbury 

Tillsonburg 

Toronto 

Tottenham 

Trenton 



kw 

1,687.7 
2,142.7 
1,384.0 
11,981.6 
2,309.9 

10,738.5 

1,982.6 

770.8 

732.9 

290.0 

1,447.9 
1,261.2 
5,086.5 
3,332.9 
27,557.4 

5,693.5 

4,909.4 

3,993.7 

56,740.1 

622.4 

760.8 
1,850.9 

854.7 
1,331.7 
2,879.9 

1,133.7 
1,645.1 
1,326.9 
1,082.6 
634.6 

1,180.9 

1,365.6 

276.6 

176.5 

6,811.4 

3,057.9 
7,404.3 



megawatt- 
hours 

9,915.4 
10,427.1 

7,768.9 
69,011.5 
13,940.8 

58,441.0 

11,126.6 

3,743.6 

3,767.3 

1 ,469.6 

8,182.6 

6,781.7 

24,675.4 

17,996.6 

156,692.7 

31,681.0 

28,627.9 

22,176.8 

341,579.9 

3,209.6 

3,952.5 

10,660.8 

4,794.9 

7,024.8 

16,638.2 

5,747.5 
10,273.3 
7,504.0 
4,908.4 
3,253.6 

6,867.2 

7,347.2 

1,414.0 

860.4 

39,513.3 

14,734.6 
40,503.6 



806,910.7 5,053,389.9 

553.8 2,837.6 

18,104.2 111,925.9 



$ 
45,697 
58,018 
37,477 
324,429 
62,546 

290,768 

53,684 

20,871 

19,845 

7,852 

39,205 
34,150 

137,729 
90,245 

746,181 

154,165 

132,935 

108,138 

1,536,369 

16,854 

20,599 
50,117 
23,142 
36,059 
77,979 

30,697 
44,546 
35,930 
29,314 
17,184 

31,975 

36,979 

7,489 

4,780 

184,434 

82,799 

200,488 

21,848,952 

14,995 

490,213 



$ 

4,184 
5,416 
3,431 
30,275 
5,727 

27,143 

4,916 

1,921 

1,852 

719 

3,590 
3,188 

12,615 
8,424 

69,655 

14,391 

12,409 

10,095 

143,421 

1,543 

1,923 
4,589 
2,119 
3,302 
7,252 

2,827 
4,159 
3,290 
2,684 
1,573 

2,985 

3,386 

686 

438 

17,207 

7,730 

18,716 

1,762,028 

1,373 

45,761 



$ 
4,384 

3,595 

529 

6,000 



5,150 
1,450 

753 

3,761 

12,987 

72 



1,617 



4,808 
2,220 
3,459 
1,444 

2,076 

3,446 
2,812 
1,648 



3,547 
718 
458 



1,438 



211 

565 

4,989 
398 

256 
606 
271 

42 



386 
2,799 



3,312 

805 

293 

33,701 



928 
579 



292 



259 
15 

359 
2,176 
5,634 



Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 



123 



COST OF PRIMARY POWER TO MUNICIPALITIES 
Ended December 31, 1968 















Total Cost 












Demand Cost 


Of 




Energy @ 


Cost of 






(Note 7) 


Primary Power 








Return 


2.75 Mills 


Primary 


AMOUNTS 


Balance 








on Equity 


perKwh 


Power 


Billed at 


(Refunded 






Mais 


(Note 5) 


(Note 6) 


Allocated 


Interim Rates 


or Charged) 


$ per Kw 


$ per Kw 


per Kwh 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 








3,741 


27,267 


78,002 


78,412.59 


410.59 


30.06 


46.22 


7.87 


10,459 


28,675 


88,643 


88,164.99 


478.01 


27.98 


41.37 


8.50 


5,215 


21,364 


61,344 


60,229.61 


1,114.39 


28.88 


44.32 


7.90 


37,138 


189,782 


548,811 


542,837.94 


5,973.06 


29.96 


45.80 


7.95 


8,011 


38,337 


104,997 


103,798.13 


1,198.87 


28.85 


45.46 


7.53 


35,838 


160,713 


448,411 


442,309.32 


6,101.68 


26.78 


41.76 


7.67 


6,541 


30,598 


89,404 


89,597.12 


193.12 


29.66 


45.09 


8.04 


2,495 


10,295 


34,625 


34,848.23 


223.23 


31.55 


44.92 


9.25 


580 


10,360 


31,477 


31,086.05 


390.95 


28.81 


42.95 


8.36 


1,646 


4,041 


12,631 


12,417.65 


213.35 


29.61 


43.56 


8.60 


5,004 


22,502 


64,778 


64,252.89 


525.11 


29.19 


44.74 


7.92 


4,113 


18,650 


52,506 


51,504.42 


1,001.58 


26.84 


41.63 


7.74 


9,980 


67,857 


236,854 


236,257.78 


596.22 


33.22 


46.57 


9.60 


8,412 


49,491 


152,546 


152,583.42 


37.42 


30.92 


45.77 


8.48 


108,673 


430,905 


1,220,812 


1,207,166.83 


13,645.17 


28.66 


44.30 


7.79 


20,675 


87,123 


255,397 


253,522.21 


1,874.79 


29.55 


44.86 


8.06 


9,279 


78,727 


230,325 


230,478.80 


153.80 


30.87 


46.92 


8.05 


6,708 


60,986 


172,804 


170,597.91 


2,206.09 


27.99 


43.27 


7.79 


141,558 


939,345 


2,511,278 


2,491,052.89 


20,225.11 


27.70 


44.26 


7.35 


2,156 


8,826 


26,995 


27,014.66 


19.66 


29.19 


43.37 


8.41 


1,233 


10,869 


32,538 


32,284.54 


253.46 


28.48 


42.77 


8.23 


6,056 


29,317 


88,328 


87,065.88 


1,262.12 


31.88 


47.72 


8.29 


2,386 


13,186 


38,708 


38,547.57 


160.43 


29.86 


45.29 


8.07 


7,933 


19,318 


59,128 


57,905.60 


1,222.40 


29.89 


44.40 


8.42 


8,147 


45,755 


133,502 


133,357.79 


144.21 


30.46 


46.36 


8.02 


I 3,802 


15,806 


48,171 


47,914.60 


256.40 


28.54 


42.49 


8.38 


4,550 


28,252 


72,699 


72,396.47 


302.53 


27.01 


44.19 


7.08 


4,086 


20,636 


63,197 


62,918.73 


278.27 


32.07 


47.63 


8.42 


4,355 


13,498 


47,201 


47,732.35 


531.35 


31.13 


43.60 


9.62 


2,638 


8,947 


28,618 


28,466.33 


151.67 


30.99 


45.10 


8.80 


1,608 


18,885 


52,496 


51,593.22 


902.78 


28.46 


44.45 


7.64 


2,714 


20,205 


62,086 


62,158.93 


72.93 


30.66 


45.46 


8.45 


1,532 


3,888 


12,094 


11,954.78 


139.22 


29.67 


43.72 


8.55 


767 


2,366 


7,363 


7,272.74 


90.26 


28.30 


41.72' 


8.56 


45,999 


108,662 


285,097 


283,652.00 


1,445.00 


25.90 


41.86 


7.22 


11,895 


40,520 


130,504 


131,103.92 


599.92 


29.42 


42.68 


8.86 


23,894 


111,385 


328,908 


325,655.55 


3,252.45 


29.37 


44.42 


8.12 


\ 3,993,628 


13,896,823 


35,940,541 


35,575,087.09 


365,453.91 


27.32 


44.54 


7.11 


2,511 


7,803 


23,375 


22,743.28 


631.72 


28.12 


42.21 


8.24 


57,556 


307,796 


795,266 


790,165.59 


5,100.41 


26.92 


43.93 


7.11 



124 



Appendix II — Finance 



STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION OF THE 

for the Year 



Municipality 



Primary Power and 

Energy Supplied 

during Year 

(Principal Bases of 
Cost Allocation) 



Average of 

Monthly 

Peak Loads 



Energy 



Common 

Demand 

Costs 

(Note 1) 



Transformation 
and Metering 

(Note 2) 



Stage! 



Stage II 



Special 
Facili- 
ties 

(Note 3) 



Tweed 

Uxbridge 

Vankleek Hill . . 
Vaughan Twp. . 
Victoria Harbour 

Walkerton 

Wallaceburg . . . 

Wardsville 

Warkworth .... 
Wasaga Beach . . 

Waterdown .... 

Waterford 

Waterloo 

Watford 

Waubaushene . . 

Webbwood .... 

Welland 

Wellesley 

Wellington .... 
West Lome .... 

Westport 

Wheatley 

Whitby 

Wiarton 

Williamsburg . . . 

Winchester .... 
Windermere . . . 

Windsor 

Wingham 

Woodbridge . . . 

Woodstock .... 

Woodville 

Wyoming 

York 

Zurich 



kw 

1,792.9 

3,275.2 

1,217.8 

24,145.0 

775.1 

5,214.7 

18,977.3 

225.6 

419.6 

1,246.5 

1,536.1 

1,917.6 

38,017.8 

1,815.4 

501.1 

265.3 

36,900.5 

649.2 

752.6 

1,426.4 

541.2 

1,060.1 

21,783.5 

1,779.5 

294.2 

2,123.7 

234.6 

174,776.4 

3,599.4 

2,369.4 

31,560.7 
309.3 
866.2 

94,045.2 
606.9 



megawatt- 
hours 

9,123.3 

17,372.0 

5,717.0 

151,327.1 

4,100.0 

27,002.6 

109,633.8 

1,141.5 

2,098.0 

5,550.8 

8,534.4 
8,938.3 
234,673.5 
9,619.7 
2,646.4 

1,390.5 
205,297.6 
3,030.4 
4,024.7 
6,607.2 

2,874.4 

5,725.8 

128,684.5 

10,209.6 

1,457.6 

12,452.2 

1,005.0 

1,047,641.6 

20,415.7 

14,677.6 

185,316.9 
1,551.6 
4,245.6 

591,906.7 
3,159.0 



48,547 
88,683 
32,975 
653,782 
20,987 

141,198 

513.854 

6,108 

11,360 

33,752 

41,593 
51,923 
1,029.418 
49,157 
13,567 

7,184 

999,165 

17,578 

20,377 

38,623 

14,654 

28,706 

589.839 

48,184 

7,967 

57,504 

6,353 

4,732,470 

97,462 

64,158 

854,578 

8,375 

23,453 

2,546,490 

16,432 



4,445 
8,278 
3,019 
60,801 
1,922 

13,181 

47,968 

559 

1,040 

3,090 

3,809 
4,775 
3,409 
4,541 
1,242 

671 

93,259 

1,610 

1,866 

3,537 

1,342 

2,628 

55,003 

4,412 

729 

5,291 

593 

441,778 

9,098 

5,895 

79,775 

767 

2,148 

237,715 

1,505 



$ 
4,657 

3,163 

12,291 

2,013 



586 
1,090 
3,238 

3,990 
3,875 
1,679 
2,575 
1,302 



1,686 
1,955 
3,705 

1,406 
2,753 
3,169 
4,622 
764 

4,126 



5,059 



803 
2,250 



1,576 



254 
46 

12,008 
311 

3,476 

2,947 

89 



103 
43 



,729 



169 



309 
1,181 



Total Municipalities 



5,529,605.3 33,426,061.6 



149,726,709 



13,048,971 



837,166 



847,181 



Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 



125 



COST OF PRIMARY POWER TO MUNICIPALITIES 
Ended December 31, 1968 















Total Cost 












Demand Cost 


Of 




Energy @ 


Cost of 






(Note 7) 


Primary Power 








return 


2.75 Mills 


Primary 


AMOUNTS 


Balance 






Mais 

per Kwh 


on Equity 


perKwh 


Power 


Billed at 


(Refunded 






(Note 5) 


(Note 6) 


Allocated 


Interim Rates 


or Charged) 


$ per K.w 


$ per Kw 


$ 
5,284 


$ 
25,089 


$ 

78,604 


$ 
77,837.31 


$ 
766.69 


29.84 


43.84 


8.62 


8,214 


47,773 


138,204 


136,210.62 


1,993.38 


27.60 


42.20 


7.96 


1,668 


15,721 


53,819 


53,829.10 


10.10 


31.28 


44.19 


9.41 


25,543 


416,149 


1,201,923 


1,152,893.91 


49,029.09 


28.54 


45.78 


7.30 


1,875 


11,275 


35,021 


34,350.98 


670.02 


30.63 


45.18 


8.54 


13,016 


74,257 


221,703 


216,936.30 


4,766.70 


28.27 


42.52 


8.21 


56,318 


301,493 


866,876 


858,388.56 


8,487.44 


29.79 


45.68 


7.91 


1,054 


3,139 


10,104 


9,925.49 


178.51 


30.87 


44.79 


8.85 


1,426 


5,769 


18,043 


17,839.72 


203.28 


29.25 


43.00 


8.60 


1,996 


15,265 


53,972 


53,810.97 


161.03 


31.05 


43.30 


9.72 


5,059 


23,470 


72,411 


71,449.09 


961.91 


31.86 


47.14 


8.48 


6,944 


24,580 


84,065 


83,090.33 


974.67 


31.01 


43.84 


9.41 


82,296 


645,352 


1,711,615 


1,695,382.83 


16,232.17 


28.04 


45.02 


7.29 


6,911 


26,454 


81,305 


81,075.55 


229.45 


30.20 


44.79 


8.45 


1,588 


7,278 


22,052 


21,735.82 


316.18 


29.48 


44.01 


8.33 


384 


3,824 


11,295 


10,975.53 


319.47 


28.15 


42.57 


8.12 


107,730 


564,568 


1,659,963 


1,644,908.87 


15,054.13 


29.68 


44.98 


8.09 


2.671 


8,334 


28,485 


28,218.15 


266.85 


31.04 


43.88 


9.40 


3,495 


11,068 


32,147 


31,789.37 


357.63 


28.01 


42.71 


7.99 


6,231 


18,170 


62,083 


62,196.27 


113.27 


30.78 


43.52 


9.40 


2,009 


7,905 


23,569 


23,422.94 


146.06 


28.94 


43.55 


8.20 


4,625 


15,746 


48,388 


48,188.39 


199.61 


30.79 


45.64 


8.45 


45,659 


353,882 


975,855 


945,365.22 


30,489.78 


28.55 


44.80 


7.58 


6,582 


28,076 


79,602 


79,522.34 


79.66 


28.95 


44.73 


7.80 


1,491 


4,008 


12,124 


11,935.84 


188.16 


27.58 


41.21 


8.32 


6,199 


34,244 


96,197 


95,423.64 


773.36 


29.16 


45.30 


7.73 


861 


2,764 


8,966 


9,016.63 


50.63 


26.43 


38.22 


8.92 


687,252 


2,881,014 


7,892,647 


7,900,214.69 


7,567.69 


28.67 


45.16 


7.53 


12,701 


56,143 


152,983 


152,520.15 


462.85 


26.90 


42.50 


7.49 


10,385 


40,363 


112,198 


110,372.66 


1,825.34 


30.32 


47.35 


7.64 


102,450 


509,621 


1,436,206 


1,422,114.67 


14,091.33 


29.35 


45.51 


7.75 


1,439 


4,267 


12,928 


12,457.82 


470.18 


28.00 


41.80 


8.33 


2,304 


11,675 


39,904 


39,955.74 


51.74 


32.59 


46.07 


9.40 


327,459 


1,627,743 


4,366,758 


4,322,245.93 


44,512.07 


29.12 


46.43 


7.38 


2,749 


8,687 


27,272 


27,017.27 


254.73 


30.62 


44.94 


8.63 


16,499,279 


91,921,669 


252,915,270 


250,303,533.61 


2,611,736.39 









126 Appendix II — Finance 



NOTES 

1. Certain functions in the production and supply of power are considered to be used by all customers in 
relation to kilowatt demand requirements. Therefore the associated costs are allocated at a common 
rate to all customers. 

2. Stage I transformation and metering costs are those associated with transformation at high-voltage 
stations from 115 kv to a lesser voltage, but which exceeds 10 kv. These costs are allocated on a kilowatt 
basis to all customers requiring the service. 

Stage II transformation and metering costs are those associated with transformation at low-voltage 
stations from 44 kv, 27.6 kv, 13.8 kv or similar voltages to a delivery voltage of less than 10 kv. These 
costs are allocated on a kilowatt basis to all customers requiring the service. 

3. Special facilities costs are those associated with line facilities within a municipality's boundaries, that 
serve only that municipality, and the charges for providing standby facilities for municipalities requiring 
that service. 

4. Frequency standardization assessments are made to customers of the former Southern Ontario System 
at the rate of $3.00 per kilowatt to all customers who were converted to 60-cycle frequency, and $.50 
per kilowatt to all non-converted 60-cycle customers. 

5. Return on equity is calculated at 4% on equities accumulated through debt retirement charges after 
giving recognition to direct customers' contributions for debt retirement prior to 1966. The cost of 
providing the return on equity is included in common demand costs. 

6. The portion of the cost of power attributable to producing energy, rather than meeting demand require- 
ments, has been classified as energy costs. For allocation purposes, this cost has been established at 
2.75 mills per kwh. 

7. The demand cost is the per kilowatt cost of primary power, exclusive of energy cost. 

8. The asterisk indicates that this particular utility operates its own generating facilities for the supply of 
part of its power requirement. The amounts shown in this statement relate only to the power and energy 
supplied by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario. For more complete details on the cost 
of providing service within any municipal electrical utility, the reader is referred to the statements in the 
Municipal Electrical Service Supplement. 



Allocation of the Cost of Primary Power 



127 



STATEMENT OF THE ALLOCATION OF THE COST OF 
PRIMARY POWER 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 





Municipalities 


Power District 


TOTAL 




Retail 

Customers 

(Note 1) 


Direct 
Customers 




Cost of Primary Power 

Cost, excluding items shown below 

Frequency standardization assessments (Note 2 

Cost of return on equity 

Return on equity 


$ 

224,357,281 

) 13,032,853 

16,159,553 

16,499,279 


$ 

94,073,099 
1,590,768 
4,699,819 
4,571,430 


$ 

67,170,710 

999,573 

4,462,839 

4,251,502 


$ 

385,601,090 
15,623,194 
25,322,211 
25,322,211 


Total before reserve provision (withdrawal) 
Provision and interest - reserve for 
stabilization of rates and contingencies . . 


237,050,408 
15,864,862 


95,792,256 
3,169,068 


68,381,620 
4,546,194 


401,224,284 
23,580,124 


Cost of primary power allocated to customers 


252,915,270 


98,961,324 


72,927,814 


424,804,408 


Amounts Billed for Primary Power 


250,303,534 


95,940,830 


66,106,170 


412,350,534 


Excess of Costs over Amounts Billed 

Charged to Municipalities 

Withdrawal from the reserve for stabilization 
of rates and contingencies to offset deficit 
on sales to retail and direct customers . . . 


2,611,736 


3, 020,494 


6,821,644 


2,611,736 
9,842,138 



Notes 



1. The cost of primary power allocated to retail customers totalling $98,961,324 
includes retail distribution costs of $47,022,158. 

2. See note 2 on page 35. 






128 



Appendix II — Finance 



STATEMENT OF EQUITIES ACCUMULATED THROUGH 
DEBT RETIREMENT CHARGES 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



Municipality 



Balance at 
December 31, 1967 



Additions in the 

Year through 

Debt Retirement 

Charges 



Annexations 

and Other 
Adjustments 



Balance at 
December 31, 196 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig . . . 

Ajax 

Alexandria . . . 
Alfred 

Alliston 

Almonte .... 
Alvinston .... 
Amherstburg . 
Ancaster Twp 

Apple Hill ... 

Arkona 

Arnprior .... 

Arthur 

Athens 

Atikokan Twp. 

Aurora 

Avonmore . . . 

Aylmer 

Ayr 

Baden 

Bancroft .... 

Barrie 

Barry's Bay . . 
Bath 

Beachburg . . . 
Beachville . . . 
Beamsville . . . 
Beaverton . . . 
Beeton 

Belle River . . . 
Belleville .... 

Belmont 

Blenheim .... 
Bloomfield . . . 

Blyth 

Bobcaygeon . . 

Bolton 

Bothwell .... 
Bowmanville . 

Bracebridge . . 
Bradford .... 

Braeside 

Brampton . . . 
Brantford .... 



611,788.17 


29,054.83 


65,832.15 


2,071.85 


386,148.46 


54,891.54 


261,588.24 


18,870.76 


33,810.07 


4,588.93 


268,388.42 


18,861.58 


144,912.63 


12,755.37 


68,451.33 


1,792.67 


492,014.81 


25,550.19 


235,821.77 


13,898.23 


19,188.14 


807.86 


50,815.49 


1,642.51 


446,900.71 


35,623.29 


117,757.41 


5,403.59 


61,174.95 


3,637.05 


309,052.53 


18,744.47 


452,048.25 


43,229.75 


11,715.48 


937.52 


482,394.99 


26,460.01 


108,332.10 


5,446.90 


153,112.80 


5,133.20 


97,225.08 


8,809.92 


1,881,677.80 


144,763.04 


35,921.67 


4,691.33 


36,179.43 


2,672.57 


23,669.90 


2,371.10 


293,485.50 


12,264.50 


181,017.70 


14,078.30 


148,512.61 


7,717.39 


86,643.26 


3,449.74 


106,438.49 


7,021.51 


2,450,529.45 


146,891.55 


35,182.41 


5,949.59 


247,520.82 


11,704.18 


62,719.73 


3,076.27 


94,470.50 


4,555.50 


71,085.39 


6,776.61 


134,759.19 


8,705.81 


76,189.61 


2,893.39 


859,982.73 


50,105.27 


20,991.07 


6,698.93 


203,565.78 


12,518.22 


89,435.25 


9,842.75 


1,717,700.97 


176,204.03 


6,857,091.93 


304,403.07 



167.16* 






Equities Accumulated by Municipalities 



129 



STATEMENT OF EQUITIES ACCUMULATED THROUGH 
DEBT RETIREMENT CHARGES 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



Municipality 



Balance at 
December 31, 1967 



Additions in the 

Year through 

Debt Retirement 

Charges 



Annexations 

and Other 
Adjustments 



Balance at 
December 31, 1968 



Brantford Twp 

Brechin 

Bridgeport . . . 

Brigden 

i Brighton 

i Brockville . . . 

Brussels 

Burford 

Burgessville . . 
Burk's Falls . . 

Burlington . . . 
i Cache Bay . . . 
] Caledonia .... 

Campbellford . 

Campbellville . 

i Cannington . . 

Capreol 

, Cardinal 

Carleton Place 
: Casselman . . . 

i Cayuga 

Chalk River . . 
I Chapleau .... 

(Chatham .... 
Chatsworth . . 

, Chesley 

■ Chesterville . . 

Chippawa .... 

Clifford 

Clinton 

Cobden 

Cobourg 

Cochrane .... 

Colborne 

Coldwater . . . 

Colhngwood . 

Comber 

Coniston .... 
Cookstown . . 
'Cottam 

C'ourtright . . . 
Creemore .... 
Dashwood . . . 
Deep River . . . 
Delaware . . . 



535,633.89 


49,574.11 


26,571.06 


854.94 


100,763.09 


7,527.91 


53,722.86 


1,543.14 


178,778.11 


11,598.89 


1,876,889.67 


111,192.33 


103,280.72 


3,735.28 


108,191.92 


4,882.08 


32,435.80 


1,406.20 


52,890.53 


5,196.47 


2,249,991.21 


302,987.79 


32,209.32 


1,295.94 


158,239.47 


7,315.53 


44,790.62 


9,832.38 


24,049.31 


946.69 


98,485.98 


4,682.02 


156,448.41 


11,800.59 


111,313.43 


5,049.93 


580,180.22 


21,305.78 


52,431.10 


4,916.90 


75,453.99 


3,413.01 


33,664.88 


2,865.12 


46,633.81 


9,390.19 


2,937,693.31 


170,638.69 


39,635.18 


1,647.82 


223,040.14 


7,986.86 


181,985.76 


8,954.24 


150,436.39 


9,676.61 


59,860.99 


2,244.01 


329,194.82 


13,767.18 


61,364.38 


3,821.62 


1,040,048.39 


77,916.61 


156,675.31 


18,570.69 


103,064.30 


6,985.70 


84,214.32 


4,535.68 


914,431.22 


59,880.78 


73,876.14 


1,990.86 


49,217.33 


7,386.67 


48,980.28 


2,770.72 


40,430.40 


1,707.60 


34,373.83 


1,486.17 


76,097.04 


3,336.96 


53,106.20 


2,201.80 


182,492.46 


24,416.54 


32,302.74 


1,516.26 



307.74 = 



38.64 = 



585,208.00 
27,426.00 

108,291.00 
55,266.00 

190,377.00 

1,988,082.00 

107,016.00 

113,074.00 

33,842.00 

58,087.00 

2,552,979.00 

33,813.00 

165,555.00 

54,623.00 

24,996.00 

103,168.00 
168,249.00 
116,402.00 
601,486.00 
57,348.00 

78,867.00 
36,530.00 
56,024.00 
3,108,332.00 
41,283.00 

231,027.00 
190,940.00 
160,113.00 
62,105.00 
342,962.00 

65,186.00 

1,117,965.00 

175,246.00 

110,050.00 

88,750.00 

974,312.00 
75,867.00 
56,604.00 
51,751.00 
42,138.00 

35,860.00 
79,434.00 
55,308.00 
206,909.00 
33,819.00 



130 



Appendix II — Finance 



STATEMENT OF EQUITIES ACCUMULATED THROUGH 
DEBT RETIREMENT CHARGES 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



Municipality 



Balance at 
December 31, 1967 



Additions in the 

Year through 

Debt Retirement 

Charges 



Annexations 

and Other 
Adjustments 



Balance at 
December 31, 19( 



Delhi 

Deseronto .... 
Dorchester .... 

Drayton 

Dresden 

Drumbo 

Dryden 

Dublin 

Dundalk 

Dundas 

Dunnville 

Durham 

Dutton 

East York 

Eganville 

Elmira 

Elmvale 

Elmwood 

Elora 

Embro 

Embrun 

Erieau 

Erie Beach .... 

Erin 

Espanola 

Essex 

Etobicoke .... 

Exeter 

Fenelon Falls . . 
Fergus 

Finch 

Flesherton .... 

Fonthill 

Forest 

Fort William . . 

Frankford .... 

Gait 

Georgetown . . . 

Glencoe 

Gloucester Twp. 

Goderich 

Grand Bend 
Grand Valley . . 

Granton 

Gravenhurst 



242,470.95 

122,935.74 

57,804.15 

73,020.99 

226,810.59 

42,722.76 

237,088.31 

36,768.40 

95,387.14 

1,041,394.43 

537,766.23 
220,169.40 

94,802.98 
4,203,902.94 

38,664.06 

563,926.04 
92,095.67 
32,785.90 

181,125.65 
64,786.53 

34,293.71 
66,855.68 
11,786.64 
48,626.28 
91,381.65 

258,206.13 

15,430,011.72 

333,264.79 

2,015.00 

546,216.07 

41,604.83 

48,437.74 

125,154.60 

251,704.35 

7,320,352.48 

60,538.38 

3,680,562.37 

923,299.11 

118,503.00 

623,353.01 

858,166.24 
88,104.72 
83,041.03 
31,645.09 

347,640.09 



15,495.05 
6,991.26 
3,010.85 
2,654.01 

13,377.41 

1,522.24 

24,948.69 

1,902.60 

4,724.86 

62,338.57 

23,164.77 
11,277.60 

2,185.02 
220,147.06 

4,355.94 

30,276.51 
4,869.33 
1,125.10 
5,866.35 
2,655.47 

5,471.29 

2,471.32 

504.36 

5,215.72 

18,328.35 

13,199.87 

,352,979.28 

14,925.21 

5,892.70 

36,858.30 

1,655.17 
2,893.26 
8,097.40 
9,657.65 
208,978.52 

6,031.62 

189,615.63 

68,888.89 

4,734.00 
111,214.99 

39,007.76 

4,850.28 

3,483.97 

920.91 

15,465.91 



1,169.45* 



1,269.30* 
6,035.63* 



257,966.00 

129,927.00 

60,815.00 

75,675.00 

240,188.00 

44,245.00 
262,037.00 

38,671.00 

100,112.00 

1,103,733.00 

560,931.00 
231,447.00 

96,988.00 
4,424,050.00 

43,020.00 

595,372.00 
96,965.00 
33,911.00 

186,992.00 
67,442. 

39,765.0C 
69,327. 
12.291.0C 
53.842.0C 
109,710.0C 

271,406.0( 

16,782,991.0( 

348,190.0( 

9,177.0( 

589,110.01 

43,260.01 
51,331.0". 

133,252.0 

261,362.0 

7,529,331.0 

66,570.0 

3,870,178.0 

992,188.0 

123,237.0 

734,568.0 

897.174.C 
92,955.C 
86,525.C 
32,566.C 

363.106.C 



Equities Accumulated by Municipalities 



131 



STATEMENT OF EQUITIES ACCUMULATED THROUGH 
DEBT RETIREMENT CHARGES 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



Municipality 



Balance at 
December 31, 1967 



Additions in the 

Year through 

Debt Retirement 

Charges 



Annexations 

and Other 
Adjustments 



Balance at 
December 31, 1968 



Grimsby 

Guelph 

Hagersville 

Hamilton 

Hanover 

Harriston 

Harrow 

lHastings 

iHavelock 

Hawkesbury 

Hearst 

Hensall 

Hespeler 

Highgate 

i Holstein 

i Huntsville 

Ingersoll 

, Iroquois 

larvis 

j ilCapuskasing .... 

I |<emptville 

l<enora 

; i<illaloe Station . 
fi iCincardine 

<ing City 

ungston 

Cingsville 

,iirkfieid 

ij jCitchener 

i akefield 

ambeth 

; anark 

ancaster 

arder Lake Twp. 
atchford 

eamir.gton .... 

mdsay 

istowel 

; ondon 

il ) Orignal 

. "can 

:; iucknow 

ynden 

' | adoc 

lagnetawan .... 



287,566.34 


21,538.66 


4,787,728.30 


323,236.70 


366,943.36 


12,208.44 


46,734,136.30 


2,668,326.70 


571,293.88 


32,446.12 


218,893.54 


8,803.46 


227,074.21 


10,266.79 


58,327.63 


3,570.37 


92,099.67 


4,054.33 


220,444.98 


32,338.02 


135,998.40 


18,057.60 


123,336.69 


5,602.31 


892,964.52 


39,070.30 


44,911.89 


1,456.11 


17,657.78 


716.22 


444,029.89 


17,393.11 


1,028,416.87 


36,938.13 


83,884.08 


5,726.92 


83,994.26 


2,263.74 


229,161.63 


25,688.37 


221,524.29 


13,099.71 


26,434.00 


45,026.00 


22,859.55 


2,186.45 


365,486.95 


13,784.05 


54,014.73 


7,259.27 


4,265,605.93 


271,831.07 


302,482.61 


14,170.39 


18,038.89 


719.11 


9,542,338.46 


573,786.54 


176,752.79 


9,933.21 


111,558.60 


7,513.40 


52,971.93 


3,192.07 


41,628.50 


2,129.50 


67,034.72 


4,558.28 


11,612.53 


1,355.47 


878,106.28 


45,469.28 


1,234,494.67 


73,223.33 


543,751.96 


24,379.04 


15,306,466.52 


896,197.48 


31,031.55 


4,376.45 


100,529.72 


3,978.28 


149,061.76 


5,320.24 


55,349.03 


2,298.97 


119,158.10 


6,293.90 


8,421.59 


680.41 



155.20' 



469.18* 



173.44 : 



309,105.00 

5,110,965.00 

379,307.00 

49,402,463.00 

603,740.00 

227,697.00 

237,341.00 

61,898.00 

96,154.00 

252,783.00 

154,056.00 

128,939.00 

932,504.00 

46,368.00 

18,374.00 

461,423.00 

1,065,355.00 

89,611.00 

86,258.00 

254,850.00 

234,624.00 
71,460.00 
25,046.00 

379,271.00 
61,274.00 

4,537,437.00 

316,653.00 

18,758.00 

10,116,125.00 

186,686.00 

119,072.00 
56,164.00 
43,758.00 
71,593.00 
12,968.00 

923,749.00 

1,307,718.00 

568,131.00 

16,202,664.00 

35,408.00 

104,508.00 

154,382.00 

57,648.00 

125,452.00 

9.102.00 



132 



Appendix II — Finance 



STATEMENT OF EQUITIES ACCUMULATED THROUGH 
DEBT RETIREMENT CHARGES 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



Municipality 



Balance at 
December 31, 1967 



Additions in the 

Year through 

Debt Retirement 

Charges 



Annexations 

and Other 
Adjustments 



Balance at 
December 31, 1968 



Markdale 

Markham 

Marmora 

Martintown . . . 
Massey 

Maxville 

McGarry Twp . 

Meaford 

Merlin 

Merrickville . . . 

Midland 

Mildmay 

Millbrook 

Milton 

Milverton 

Mississauga 

Mitchell 

Moore field 
Morrisburg 
Mount Brydges 

Mount Forest . . 

Napanee 

Nepean Twp. . . 

Neustadt 

Newboro 

Newburg 

Newbury 

Newcastle 
New Hamburg 
Newmarket . . 

Niagara 

Niagara Falls . 

Nipigon , 

North Bay 

North York . . 

Norwich 

Norwood .... 

Oakville 

Oil Springs . . . 
Omemee .... 

Orangeville . . . 

Orillia 

Orono 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 



94,530.41 
312,032.25 
87,182.75 
20,207.15 
30,580.74 

75,203.30 
67,557.92 
372,706.57 
60,360.87 
40,426.60 

1,304,237.70 

60,514.84 

48,773.05 

616,928.00 

190,502.74 

5,172,943.56 

295,631.67 

40,414.88 

134,048.92 

54,238.98 

270,734.97 

493,474.25 

987,444.14 

43,293.33 

9,083.35 

22,704.57 

24,994.97 

93,512.69 

260,800.72 

560,925.47 

256,231.80 
4,568,053.40 

185,915.19 

2,507,176.54 

14,150,706.46 

175,052.47 

78,480.11 

3,290,520.78 

87,630.46 

49,929.17 

439,522.93 

472,068.87 

51,705.04 

7,774,663.44 

13,609,829.02 



$ 

5,197.59 

36,555.75 

4,983.25 

886.85 

3,883.26 

3,820.70 
4,409.08 
20,813.43 
2,319.13 
3,790.40 

58,596.30 
2,788.16 
3,010.95 

32,031.00 
5,867.26 

735,385.44 

14,438.33 

2,013.12 

8,545.08 

3,036.02 

14,207.79 

20,425.75 

236,188.86 

2,273.67 

966.65 

1,795.43 

1,471.03 

6,759.31 

11,152.28 

46,118.53 

10,498.20 

223,920.60 

8,985.81 

186,436.46 

1,787,859.54 

4,952.53 
4,081.89 
454,231.22 
1,989.54 
3,067.83 

27,259.07 

66,301.13 

4,180.96 

543,698.56 

1,391,997.98 



637.24* 



114,433.00" 



99,728.00 
348,588.00 
92,166.00 
21,094.00 
34,464.00 

79,024.00 
71,967.00 
393,520.00 
62,680.00 
44,217.00 

1,362,834.00 

63,303.00 

51,784.00 

648,959.00 

196,370.00 

5,908,329.00 
310,070.00 

42,428.00 
142,594.00 

57,275.00 

285,580.00 

513,900.00 

1,223,633.00 

45,567.00 

10,050.00 

24,500.00 

26,466.00 

100,272.00 

271,953.00 

607,044.00 

266,730.00 
4,791.974.00 

194,901.00 

2,579,180.00 

15,938,566.00 

180,005.00 

82,562.00 

3,744,752.00 

89,620.00 

52,997.00 

466,782.00 

538,370.00 

55,886.00 

8,318,362.00 

15,001,827.00 









Equities Accumulated by Municipalities 



133 



STATEMENT OF EQUITIES ACCUMULATED THROUGH 
DEBT RETIREMENT CHARGES 

for the Year Ended Ended December 31, 1968 



Municipality 



Balance at 
December 31, 1967 



Additions in the 

Year through 

Debt Retirement 

Charges 



Annexations 

and Other 
Adjustments 



Balance at 
December 31, 1968 



OtterviUe 

Owen Sound . . 

Paisley 

Palmerston 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke 

Penetanguishene 
Perth 

Peterborough . . . 

Petrolia 

'ickering 

5 icton 

iMantagenet 

'lattsville 

'oint Edward . . . 
'ort Arthur . . . . 
>ort Burwell . . . 
'ort Colborne . . 

'ort Credit 

'ort Dover 

'ort Elgin 

'ort Hope 

'ort McNicoll . . 

'ort Perry 

'ort Rowan 
'ort Stanley . . . . 

"rescott 

'reston 

'riceville 

Princeton 

)ueenston 

lainy River . . . . 
ted Rock 

Renfrew 

Uchniond 

tichmond Hill . . 

tidgetown 

'ipley 

tockland 

lockwood 

ilodney 

;>osseau 

Russell 

: 



$ 

58,925.50 


$ 
2,231.50 


1,829,985.27 


95,740.73 


79,541.18 


3,140.82 


229,163.81 


7,255.19 


624,954.37 


25,752.63 


138,479.85 


5,603.15 


197,756.43 


20,921.57 


18,726.00 


22,726.00 


386,061.49 


19,591.51 


613,704.01 


27,678.99 


4,828,226.50 


300,338.50 


450,640.70 


15,270.30 


44,991.00 


6,175.00 


545,883.07 


22,465.93 


27,834.39 


3,828.61 


82,848.10 


4,676.90 


613,801.99 


32,340.01 


2,415,479.89 


257,255.11 


33,523.27 


1,626.73 


1,078,450.90 


59,020.10 


960,308.61 


82,881.39 


268,698.39 


11,213.61 


196,886.71 


11,946.29 


954,753.46 


49,604.54 


118,161.03 


5,755.97 


185,106.67 


12,478.33 


53,604.90 


2,099.10 


226,129.66 


6,266.34 


463,237.96 


23,981.04 


1,456,460.08 


69,779.92 


7,665.56 


375.44 


55,308.15 


1,846.85 


49,447.26 


2,047.74 


33,689.69 


4,477.31 


77,872.33 


4,975.67 


349,398.46 


31,270.54 


60,294.25 


6,084.75 


733,677.46 


77,010.54 


251,590.43 


11,027.57 


58,092.00 


2,321.00 


78,679.62 


8,916.38 


68,075.65 


3,389.35 


88,767.84 


3,241.16 


24,441.05 


913.95 


45,117.24 


2,501.76 



61,157.00 
1,925,726.00 

82,682.00 
236,419.00 
650,707.00 

144,083.00 
218,678.00 
41,452.00 
405,653.00 
641,383.00 

5,128,565.00 

465,911.00 

51,166.00 

568,349.00 

31,663.00 

87,525.00 

646,142.00 

12,672,735.00 

35,150.00 

1,137,471.00 

1,043,190.00 
279,912.00 
208,833.00 

1,004,358.00 
123,917.00 

197,585.00 

55,704.00 

232,396.00 

487,219.00 

1,526,240.00 

8,041.00 
57,155.00 
51,495.00 
38,167.00 
82,848.00 

380,669.00 

66,379.00 

810,688.00 

262,618.00 

60,413.00 

87,596.00 
71,465.00 
92,009.00 
25,355.00 
47,619.00 



134 



Appendix 11 — Finance 



STATEMENT OF EQUITIES ACCUMULATED THROUGH 
DEBT RETIREMENT CHARGES 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



Municipality 



Balance at 
December 31, 1967 



Additions in the 

Year through 

Debt Retirement 

Charges 



Annexations 

and Other 
Adjustments 



St. Catharines 

St. Clair Beach 

St. George 

St. Jacobs 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas , 

Sandwich West Twp. 

Sarnia 

Scarborough , 

Schreiber , 

Seaforth 

Shelburne , 

Simcoe 

Sioux Lookout 
Smiths Falls 

Southampton 

South Grimsby Twp 

South River 

Springfield , 

Stayner , 

Stirling 

Stoney Creek 

Stouffville 

Stratford 

Strathroy , 

Streetsville 

Sturgeon Falls 

Sudbury 

Sunderland 

Sundridge 

Sutton 

Tara 

Tavistock 

Tecumseh 

Teeswater 

Terrace Bay Twp. . 

Thamesford 

Thamesville 

Thedford 

Thessalon 

Thornbury 

Thorndale 

Thornton 

Thorold 

Tilbury 



0,001,810.81 


624,709.19 


70,048.05 


5,063.95 


82,308.83 


3,525.17 


105,209.31 


4,322.69 


989,533.97 


21,822.03 


2,698,868.06 


119,344.94 


203,697.25 


22,205.75 


8,491,328.44 


252,379.56 


0,603,575.11 


1,200,826.89 


109,694.34 


8,261.66 


288,184.00 


10,490.00 


143,499.64 


6,776.36 


1,019,134.86 


58,658.14 


205,285.40 


11,308.60 


984,143.94 


52,572.06 


179,816.67 


9,706.33 


68,462.84 


3,774.16 


14,743.33 


3,587.67 


45,422.20 


1,419.80 


137,415.89 


7,088.11 


112,913.09 


6,173.91 


271,945.68 


24,902.32 


230,327.18 


16,316.82 


2,989,642.46 


134,911.54 


568,059.98 


27,874.02 


252,850.00 


24,035.00 


171,345.07 


19,551.93 


3,623,073.27 


277,780.73 


59,269.25 


3,046.75 


33,507.82 


3,725.18 


166,444.91 


9,061.09 


65,430.75 


4,184.25 


219,048.28 


6,519.72 


223,491.37 


14,098.63 


104,362.74 


5,550.26 


147,068.87 


8,054.13 


112,199.85 


6,496.15 


119,843.94 


5,300.06 


72,629.86 


3,107.14 


41,026.78 


5,781.22 


73,909.90 


6,686.10 


42,279.62 


1,354.38 


21,127.58 


864.42 


1,267,372.61 


33,346.39 


326,036.45 


14,969.45 



,374. 10' 



Equities Accumulated by Municipalities 



135 



STATEMENT OF EQUITIES ACCUMULATED THROUGH 
DEBT RETIREMENT CHARGES 

for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



Municipality 



Balance at 
December 31, 1967 



Additions in the 

Year through 

Debt Retirement 

Charges 



Annexations 

and Other 
Adjustments 



Balance at 
December 31, 1968 



illsonburg 

oronto 

bttenham 

renton 

weed 

Oxbridge 

,'ankleek Hill 

aughan Two 

i'ictoria Harbour . . . 

'alkerton 

allaceburg 

•'ardsville 

Tarkworth 

I'asaga Beach 

/aterdown 

aterford 

,'aterloo 

atford 

,'aubaushene 

■ebbwood 

elland 

jellesley , 

ellington 

est Lome 

estport 

heatley 

hitby 

iarton 

,illiamsburg 

( inchester 

indermere 

indsor 

^ngham 

oodbridge 

oodstock 

^odville 

voming 

h 

irich 

i)tal Municipahties 
District 

L 



655,645.11 

10,081,264.97 

69,226.86 

1,578,917.13 

144,915.90 

224,734.62 
45,204.75 

51,346.81 
356,141.06 

1,546,260.00 

29,056.29 

39,210.03 

54,294.97 

138,985.33 

190,878.47 

2,249,448.67 

189,993.21 

43,642.44 

9,797.92 

2,953,304.54 

73,570.00 

96,307.81 

171,538.85 

55,259.73 

127,355.90 

1,011,147.35 

181,017.69 

41,088.55 

170,117.00 

23,670.73 

18,912,848.20 

349,103.14 

285,914.07 

2,814,642.41 

39,658.09 

63,177.64 

8,997,645.32 

75,733.67 



456,792,963.65 
176,262,300.85 



633,055,264.50 



36,248.89 
3,950,373.03 

2,711.14 
88,631.87 

8,777.10 

16,034.38 

5,962.25 

118,206.00 

3,795.19 

25,528.94 

92,907.00 
1,103.71 
2,053.97 
6,102.03 
7,519.67 

9,387.53 
186,123.33 
8,887.79 
2,452.56 
1,299.08 

180,653.46 
3,178.00 
3,684.19 
6,983.15 
2,650.27 

5,190.10 

106,644.65 

8,712.31 

1,440.45 

10,397.00 

1,149.27 

855,647.80 

17,620.86 

11,599.93 

154,510.59 

1,513.91 

4,241.36 

460,414.68 

2,971.33 



27,069,096.27 
15,573,932.23 



42,643,028.50 



102 635.92 

11,797.08* 
13,357.00** 



127,790.00 



691,894.00 

114,031,638.00 

71,938.00 

1,667,549.00 

153,693.00 

240,769.00 
51,167.00 

118,206.00 
55,142.00 

381,670.00 

1,639,167.00 

30,160.00 

41,264.00 

60,397.00 

146,505.00 

200,266.00 

2,435,572.00 

198,881.00 

46,095.00 

11,097.00 

3,133,958.00 

76,748.00 

99,992.00 

178,522.00 

57,910.00 

132,546.00 
1,117,792.00 
189,730.00 
42,529.00 
180,514.00 

24,820.00 

19,768,496.00 

366,724.00 

' 297,514.00 

2,969,153.00 

41,172.00 

67,419.00 

9,458,060.00 

78.705.00 



483,759,424.00 
191.811,079.00 



675,570,503.00 



Transfer of equities from the Power District to Municipalities, resulting from annexations. 
Adjustment of prior years' matured equities. 



APPENDIX III— RURAL 



THE COMMISSION distributes power and provides service to its rural system 
customers through 69 administrative Area Offices in the province. Retail 
customers are supplied under the following classes of service: Farm, Residential, 
Residential Seasonal, and General. The description of these classes of service and 
the rates applicable to them at December 31, 1968 are included in this appendix. 



Description of Main Classes of Service 



1 



The farm class includes single-phase or three-phase electrical service to the 
farm residence and to all buildings and equipment used in the production and 
processing of farm products. In other words, for purposes of classification, a farm 
is a residence and a business. The business, which is agricultural production on 
a continuing basis, must be carried on at such a level as to ensure that the farm 
is a viable economic unit. 

The term "agricultural production", as used here, includes the work of cul- 
tivating soil, producing crops and raising livestock, as well as operations in nurs- 
eries, fur farms, hatcheries and egg production. Properties devoted solely to re- 
forestation projects or the raising of Christmas trees, or having extensive acreage 
but not engaged in agricultural production are classified according to their use, but 
not as farms. Small properties of 30 acres and under are classified as residential, 



136 



35" 



&, 



£*, 



L A J K E 

i 

S 

H Uj R N 
j 
J 

i 



NORTHEASTERN 
REGION 



GEORGIAN 



PARRY SOUND 



& 



GEORGIAN BAY 
REGION 



vpenetanguishene; 







PETERBOROUGH 



HILL I MARKHAM i 



•riveb 



V* 



&* 



W* 



EXETER ( STRATFORD 



'CENTRAL REGION 



WESTERN REGION 



LAKE 



ERIE 




EASTERN REGION 



N T"~~A-..J* I/O 



REGION 



THE HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION 
OF ONTARIO 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

SHOWING 

REGIONS AND AREAS 



Miles of Line m 

Area- 

Farm Cusfomers- 

Non-Form Curfomerj- 



DECEMBER 31, 1968 



Rural Electrical Service 137 

unless they are operated for some intensive or specialized form of agricultural 
production, for example fruit farming, poultry raising, market gardening or nur- 
series. 

Service may be supplied under one farm service to all separate dwellings on 
the property and occupied by persons engaged in its operation. Additional 
dwellings occupied by persons otherwise engaged are regarded as residential. 

The year-round residential class is applicable to establishments used primarily 
for living accommodation, and considered to be the customer's permanent resi- 
dence. There are two sub-classes of year-round residential service for rate purposes 
— Group 1 (B), which is applicable to services in designated zones of high cus- 
tomer concentration where there are at least 100 customers of any class in a 
group, with a density of not less than 25 customers per mile of line, and Group 
2 (R), which is applicable elsewhere. 

The residential seasonal class is applicable to any self-contained residential 
establishment which is not regarded as the customer's permanent residence, where 
residential occupancy is not continuous throughout a large part of the year, but 
rather, seasonal or intermittent, whether in summer or winter, or both. As in the 
year-round residential class, there are two sub-classes of residential seasonal ser- 
vice for rate purposes, Group 1 and Group 2. 

The general class is applicable to all community business, processing, or manu- 
facturing establishments supplied with single-phase or three-phase electrical ser- 
vice at secondary, rural primary distribution, or subtransmission voltage, exclusive 
of those that fall within the definition of the farm class. 

Rural Rate Structure 

The net rates in effect at December 31, 1968, are given in the accompanying 
table. They are quoted on a monthly basis except the rates for residential seasonal 
services, which are quoted on an annual basis. The table shows the number of 
kilowatt-hours in each energy block, and the rate applicable to each class of ser- 
vice. Bills are subject to a monthly minimum as shown or, for residential seasonal 
service, to an annual minimum. Bills for farm and general accounts include a de- 
mand charge for kilowatts in excess of 50 and are subject to minima based on 
demands established in previous billing periods. 

The all-electric rates in effect throughout the province apply only to year- 
round residential service where the sole source of energy is electricity, that is, 
where electric energy exclusively is used day by day for space-heating, cooking, 
and water-heating through the use of a high-performance water-heater, having 
tank and element sizes acceptable to Ontario Hydro. 

RURAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

At the end of 1968, the Commission was serving 550,685 rural customers, 
10,311 more than at the end of 1967, despite allowance for the transfer of 
8,448 customers to municipal electrical utilities following annexation. This overall 
increase is mainly due to the growth in the Residential classes. The Residential 



138 



Appendix HI — Rural 



Rural Electrical Service 1959 - 1968 
CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, AND CONSUMPTION, BY CLASSES OF SERVICE 













Monthly 














Consump- 


Average 












tion per 


Cost 


Class of Service 


Year 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Customers 


Customer 


per Kwh 






$ 


Kwh 




Kwh 


* 


*Farm 


1959 


16,122,453 


804,044,121 


140,892 


477 


2.01 




1960 


16,688,958 


850,192,892 


140,782 


503 


1.96 




1961 


17,367,400 


909,189,400 


138,924 


542 


1.91 




1962 


17,975,845 


971,696,100 


137,954 


585 


1.85 




1963 


19,086,801 


1,058,604,500 


136,864 


642 


1.80 




1964 


19,447,674 


1,090,954,900 


135,680 


667 


1.78 




1965 


20,408,010 


1,170,321,600 


134,484 


722 


1.74 




1966 


21,140,330 


1,226,165,263 


133,112 


764 


1.72 




1967 


22,373,234 


1,332,360,300 


132,235 


837 


1.68 




1968 


23,763,112 


1,403,287,300 


130,166 


891 


1.69 


♦Rural, and 














Suburban Residential . . 


1959 


18,862,773 


988,315,209 


218,287 


387 


1.91 




1960 


20,151,434 


1,070,637,716 


221,915 


405 


1.88 




1961 


20,494,966 


1,096,653,000 


205,822 


427 


1.87 




1962 


21,366,479 


1,153,182,400 


215,857 


456 


1.85 




1963 


23,616,431 


1,299,169,800 


224,024 


492 


1.82 




1964 


24,563,281 


1,364,958,200 


220,199 


512 


1.80 




1965 


25,686,192 


1,459,057,800 


220,617 


552 


1.76 




1966 


26,365,167 


1,570,966,227 


227,909 


584 


1.68 




1967 


28,967,165 


1,797,122,700 


238,386 


642 


1.61 


♦Commercial 


1968 


32,353,023 


1,992,463,900 


245,009 


687 


1.62 


(including Summer 














Commercial) 


1959 


5,764,611 


282,562,584 


38,176 


627 


2.04 




1960 


6,099,889 


301,874,591 


38,887 


653 


2.02 




1961 


6,425,565 


324,871,900 


38,496 


700 


1.98 




1962 


6,739,668 


343,061,600 


39,574 


732 


1.96 




1963 


7,423,798 


383,400,200 


40,509 


798 


1.94 




1964 


7,821,307 


407,033,500 


40,525 


837 


1.92 




1965 


8,355,580 


435,773,100 


40,506 


896 


1.92 




1966 


8,654,367 


478,810,358 


40,363 


987 


1.81 




1967 


9,077,859 


515,704,600 


40,560 


1,062 


1.76 




1968 


9,887,524 


562,106,300 


40,335 


1,158 


1.76 


Summer 


1959 


3,170,306 


60,345,721 


91,390 


57 


5.25 




1960 


4,141,665 


67,785,615 


95,196 


61 


6.11 




1961 


4,358,812 


74,693,800 


99,032 


64 


5.84 




1962 


4,613,953 


83,051,000 


103,415 


68 


5.56 




1963 


4,979,590 


96,694,400 


108,077 


76 


5.15 




1964 


5,225,074 


105,483,200 


112,445 


80 


4.95 




1965 


5,624,928 


122,354,200 


116,326 


89 


4.60 




1966 


5,835,789 


130,845,233 


120,611 


92 


4.46 




1967 


6,229,861 


148,971,200 


125,207 


101 


4.18 




1968 


6,815,172 


181,449,700 


131,003 


118 


3.76 


Industrial Power 


1959 


4,612,172 


287,458,107 


2,325 


10,795 


1.60 




1960 


5,017,774 


325,416,458 


2,511 


11,215 


1.54 




1961 


5,414,240 


354,069,300 


2,475 


11,835 


1.53 




1962 


6,236,466 


418,959,700 


2,762 


13,333 


1.49 




1963 


7,840,887 


555,322,000 


3,036 


15,963 


1.41 




1964 


9,782,441 


779,264,700 


3,139 


21,033 


1.26 




1965 


10,997,087 


907,222,800 


3,271 


23,589 


1.21 




1966 


10,082,027 


977,967,494 


3,549 


23,900 


1.03 




1967 


10,546,055 


1,071,004,500 


3,986 


23,690 


0.98 




1968 


11,665,809 


1,162,315,200 


4,172 


23,746 


1.00 



* Consumption for flat-rate water heaters is included on the basis of an estimated 16.8 hours' daily 
use. 

Note: This table will eventually be replaced by the alternative shown on the next page, in which the 
same statistical information for the years from 1966 on is presented in accordance with the 
extensive customer reclassifications introduced in that year. 



Customers, Revenue, and Consumption 



139 



Rural Electrical Service - 1966 - 1968 
CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, AND CONSUMPTION, BY CLASSES OF SERVICE 



Class of Service 



Year 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Customers 



Monthly 
Consump- 
tion per 
Customer 



Average 

Cost 
per Kwh 



♦Farm 

Year-Round 
Residential 

♦General .... 



♦Seasonal Residential 



1966 
1967 
1968 



1966 
1967 
1968 

1966 
1967 
1968 

1966 
1967 
1968 



21,312,377.49 
22,573,596.00 
24,003,192.00 



26,365,167.32 
28,967,165.00 
32,353,023.00 

18,564,346.15 
19,423,552.00 
21,313,253.00 

5,835,789.35 
6,229,861.00 
6,815,172.00 



kwh 

1,240,088,007 
1,349,750,300 
1,424,332,100 



1,570,966,227 
1,797,122,700 
1,992,463,900 

1,442,855,108 
1,569,319,100 
1,703,376,700 

130,845,233 
148,971,200 
181,449,700 



133,305 
132,454 
130,406 



227,909 
238,386 
245,009 

43,719 
44,327 
44,267 

120,611 
125,207 
131,003 



kwh 

771 
847 
903 



584 
642 
687 

2,753 



971 
,205 

92 
101 
118 



4 

1.72 
1.67 
1.69 



1.68 
1.61 
1.62 

1.29 
1.24 
1.25 

4.46 
4.18 
3.76 



* Consumption for flat-rate water heaters is included on the basis of an estimated 16.8 hours' daily 
use. 

NOTE: In this table, the general class includes the former commercial, summer commercial and 
industrial power classes. Three-phase farm service statistics formerly included with industrial 
power are now included under farm. 



| Seasonal class continues to be the fastest growing segment of our customer popul- 
ation having increased in ten years from 91,390 in 1959 to 131,003 at the end 
of 1968. 

In contrast, the number of Farm customers continues to decline, and the 
130,406 served at the end of 1968 is the lowest in any year since 1952. The de- 
cline is attributable to three main factors, the abandonment of unprofitable farms, 
the consolidation of small farms into larger units, and the reclassification of for- 
mer farm services to more appropriate classes of service. 

The decline in the number of farm service customers is not reflected in the 
revenue and energy consumption statistics which continue to show increases. 
I While revenue was at an all-time high, it was insufficient to offset the overall 
| cost of service and new rural rates were applied to all classes of service except 
Residential Seasonal, on October 1, 1968. The last-quarter introduction of these 
• ; new rates did not materially affect the average cost per kilowatt-hour to the 
customer for 1968, and as a result, this figure declined for the fourteenth con- 
secutive year. 



140 



Appendix HI — Rural 



MILES OF RURAL LINE, NUMBER OF RURAL CUSTOMERS 

as at December 31, 1968 





Miles 

of 

Primary 

Line 




Number of Customers 




Areas 

by 
Regions 


Farm 


Residential 


General 




Year- 
Round 


Seasonal 


Year- 
Round 


Seasonal 


Total 


East System 
western 

Beachville . . . x . . 

Clinton 

East Elgin 

Essex . . . 

Exeter 

Kent 

Lambton 

London 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Wallaceburg 

West Lome 

Total 

NIAGARA 

Beamsville 

Brantford 

Cayuga 


796.88 
834.16 
713.49 
1,101.51 
682.30 

1,096.76 

1,037.24 

483.22 

684.08 

681.81 

478.27 
511.57 

9,101.29 

586.16 
833.06 
738.25 
400.62 
949.63 

879.05 
820.77 
295.76 
580.30 

6,083.60 


3,043 
3,186 
3,120 
5,392 
2,720 

4,317 
4,099 
1,809 
2,929 

2,292 

1,772 
1,829 

36,508 

3,075 
3,092 
2,622 
1,623 
2,979 

3,557 

3,628 

851 

1,353 

22,780 


2,506 
1,549 
4,401 
8,339 
1,181 

3,734 
4,819 
2,505 
1,431 
2,238 

1,639 
570 

34,912 

6,143 
3,572 
2,561 
5,828 
5,211 

1,665 
4,142 
6,381 
6,117 

41,620 


45 
1,284 

169 
3,392 

618 

1,026 

1,976 

40 

16 

8 

433 
67 

9,074 

185 

61 

2,686 

1 

490 

397 

1,861 

85 

1,410 

7,176 


466 
402 
684 
1,140 
303 

842 
854 
511 
400 
456 

449 
239 

6,746 

740 
643 
510 
510 
872 

529 

533 
755 
745 

5,837 


4 
26 
15 
93 
15 

52 
97 

2 

304 

6 

6 

65 

18 

5 
96 

82 

278 


6,064 
6,447 
8,389 
18,356 
4,837 

9,971 
11,845 
4,867 
4,776 
4,994 

4,293 
2,705 

87.544 

10,149 

7,374 
8,444 


Dundas 

Guelph 

Listowel 

Simcoe 

Stoney Creek .... 
WeUand 

Total 


7,962 
9,570 

6,153 

10,260 

8,072 

9,707 

77,691 



















Miles of Line and Number of Customers 



141 



MILES OF RURAL LINE, NUMBER OF RURAL CUSTOMERS 
as at December 31, 1968 



Areas 

BY 

Regions 



Miles 

of 

Primary 

Line 



Farm 



Number of Customers 



Residential 



Year- 
Round 



Seasonal 



General 



Year- 
Round 



Seasonal 



Total 



East System 
-Continued 

CENTRAL 

Bowmanville . 
Brampton . . . 
Markham 
Richmond Hill 
Sutton 

Total 



GEORGIAN BAY 

Alliston 

Barrie 

Bracebridge . 
Cannington . 
Fenelon Falls 



Huntsville . 
Minden . . . 
Orangeville 

Orillia 

Owen Sound 



Parry Sound . . 
Penetanguishene 

Stayner 

Walkerton .... 



659.62 
619.70 
528.23 
372.67 
492.34 

2,672.56 



Total 



903.45 
550.13 
959.19 
594.16 
601.44 

835.34 
614.93 
796.97 
590.25 
1,563.76 

612.48 

627.01 

526.77 

1,749.55 

11,525.43 



1,668 
1,470 
1,461 
1,005 
1,379 

6,983 



3,106 
1,400 
283 
1,512 
1,009 

413 

309 

2,192 

1,048 

4,357 

156 

679 

1,468 

6,568 

24,500 



4,468 
8,134 
10,240 
9,114 
5,560 

37,516 



2,093 
4,580 
2,704 
1,860 
1,388 

2,665 
2,002 
2,595 
2,578 
3,619 

1,862 
2,091 
2,259 
2,447 

34,743 



1,391 
185 
562 
176 

3,293 

5,607 



443 
3,989 
9,965 
r 3,270 
5,342 

4,585 
5,806 
602 
5,035 
6,269 



3,142 
7,518 
4,520 
2,317 

62,803 



558 

780 

1,003 

1,010 

560 

3,911 



398 
562 
469 
340 
246 

450 
414 
469 
431 
882 

339 
313 
389 
819 

6,521 



26 

14 

39 

5 

111 

195 



12 
110 
335 

42 
201 

285 
196 
11 
170 
257 

231 

200 

235 

98 

2,383 



8,111 
10,583 
13,305 
11,310 
10,903 

54,212 



6,052 

10,641 

13,756 

7,024 

8,186 

8,398 
8,727 
5,869 
9,262 
15,384 

5,730 
10,801 

8,871 
12,249 

130,950 



i 



142 



Appendix III — Rural 



MILES OF RURAL LINE, NUMBER OF RURAL CUSTOMERS 

as at December 31, 1968 





Miles 

of 

Primary 

Line 


Number of Customers 


Areas 
by 


Farm 


Residential 


General 




Regions 


Year- 
Round 


Seasonal 


Year- 
Round 


Seasonal 


Total 


East System 
-Continued 

EASTERN 

Arnprior 

Bancroft 

Brockville 

Cobden 

Cobourg 

Frankford 

Kingston 

Perth 

Peterborough .... 
Picton 

Tweed 

Vankleek Hill 

Winchester 


583.63 
783.03 
895.64 
1,364.50 
634.13 

879.34 
1,169.98 
1,449.53 
1,488.27 

774.18 

906.27 
1,166.35 
1,571.30 


1,241 
597 
2,329 
2,562 
1,654 

2,403 
2,240 
2,834 
2,995 
2,569 

1,491 
4,168 
5,393 


3,656 
1,844 
4,274 
5,692 
2,850 

5,058 
8,404 
2,882 
4,840 
3,460 

2,187 
3,728 
6,509 


1,963 
4,200 
2,007 
2,339 
1,311 

827 
2,749 
4,679 
8,115 
1,453 

2,198 

1,168- 

739 


494 
449 
811 
984 
387 

772 
1,172 
649 
750 
516 

433 

924 

1,198 


51 

146 
81 

34 

184 
274 
141 

179 
14 

22 


7,405 
7,090 
9,421 
11,723 
6,283 

9,094 
14,565 
11,228 
16,974 

8,139 

6,488 
10,002 
13,861 


Total 


13,666.15 


32,476 


55,384 


33,748 


9,539 


1,126 


132,273 


NORTHEASTERN 

Algoma 


393.14 
386.98 
142.43 
644.19 
514.97 

706.72 
770.56 
696.67 
172.56 
574.29 


369 
263 
32 
838 
556 

1,207 
792 
222 
128 
787 


3,946 
3,476 
392 
2,040 
1,374 

1,903 
2,945 
11,151 
1,139 
2,261 


425 
377 
471 
1,013 
445 

610 
1,414 
1,611 

126 
1,595 


642 
436 
105 
580 
241 

537 
431 
939 
213 
395 


60 

16 

19 

136 

6 

1 

176 

37 

4 

109 


5,442 
4,568 
1,019 
4,607 
2,622 

4,258 
5,758 
13,960 
1,61C 
5,147 


Kapuskasing 

Kirkland Lake .... 

Manitoulin 

Matheson 

New Liskeard .... 

North Bay 

Sudbury 

Timmins 

Warren 




Total 


5,002.51 


5,194 


30,627 


8,087 


4,519 


564 


48,991 



Miles of Line and Number of Customers 

MILES OF RURAL LINE, NUMBER OF RURAL CUSTOMERS 
as at December 31, 1968 


143 


Areas 

by 
Regions 


Miles 

of 

Primary 

Line 


Number of Customers 




Residential 


General 




Farm 


Year- 
Round 


Seasonal 


Year- 
Round 


Seasonal 


Total 


West System 

northwestern 
Dryden 


387.03 
628.99 
144.22 
327.55 
944.24 

50.68 


208 

835 

2 

54 

866 


1,721 
1,195 
815 
1,347 
4,306 

823 


543 

344 

34 

1,634 

1,910 

43 


330 
373 
284 
249 
611 

161 


74 

49 

14 

153 

28 

18 


2,876 
2,796 
1,149 
3,437 
7,721 

1,045 


Fort Frances 

Geraldton 

Kenora 


Port Arthur 

Terrace Bay 

Total 


2,482.71 


1,965 


10,207 


4,508 


2,008 


336 


19,024 




SUMMARY-MILES OF LINE, NUMBER OF RURAL CUSTOMERS 
as at December 31,1 968 


Regions 

by 
Systems 


Miles 

of 

Primary 

Line 


Number of Customers 




Residential 


General 




Farm 


Year- 
Round 


Seasonal 


Year- 
Round 


Seasonal 


Total 


east system 

Niagara 

Central 

Western 


6,083.60 
2,672.56 
9,101.29 
13,666.15 
11,525.43 
5,002.51 


22,780 
6,983 
36,508 
32,476 
24,500 
5,194 


41,620 
37,516 
34,912 
55,384 
34,743 
30,627 


7,176 
5,607 
9,074 
33,748 
62,803 
8,087 


5,837 
3,911 
6,746 
9,539 
6,521 
4,519 


278 
195 
304 
1,126 
2,383 
564 


77,691 
54,212 
87,544 


Eastern 


132,273 


Georgian Bay .... 
Northeastern 

Total 


130,950 
48,991 


48,051.54 


128.441 


234,802 


126,495 


37,073 


4,850 


531,661 


west system 
Northwestern .... 

Grand Total 


2,482.71 
50,534.25 


1,965 
130,406 


10,207 
245.009 


4,508 
131,003 


2,008 
39,081 


336 
5,186 


19,024 
550,685 



















144 



Appendix III — Rural 



NET RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS FOR 
RURAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

(Subject to a 5 per cent late-pavment charge) 



Class and 
Designation 



Electric 
Heating 

Separately 
Billed 

i per Kwh 



Number of Kilowatt-Hours per Month Billed 
at Kwh Rate Shown 
(+indicates all additional) 



5.5* 5.0* 4.5* 2.5tf 2.2* 2.1* 1.8* 1.45* 1.3* 1.25* 1.1* 



Minimum 

Charge 
per Month 



Net Monthly 
Charge for 



250 kwh 500 kwh 



Residential 

GROUP 1 

* B 
EB - 



200 



500 
1200 



GROUP 2 



• R2' 

• R 
ER* 



1.25 
1.25 



50 



50 



200 



50 



500 

500 

1200 



$2.75 
$2.75 



$2.50 
$2.75 
$2.75 



$6.45 
$3.50 



$6.90 
$7.75 
$4.00 



$9.70 
$6.75 



$10.53 
$11.38 

$ 7.63 



ANNUAL RATES 



Residential 
Seasonal 

k GROUP 1 1S1 
i GROUP 2 IS 



First 700 

Kwh or Less 

per Year 



$40.00 
$40.00 



Balance of Kilowatt-Hours per Year 

at Kwh Rate Shown 

( + indicates all additional) 



Minimum 
Annual 
Charge 



Net Annual 
Charge for 



2.0* 



800 



1.7* 



800 



1.25* 



1.1* 



1000 
kwh 



$40.00 
$40.00 



$45.10 
$46.00 



3000 
kwh 



$70.10 

$74.75 



A Under residential and residential seasonal, group 1 are high-density and group 2 are low-density. 

*Upon application to the Commission, customers using an approved metered electric water-heater with tank and eleme 

sizes acceptable to Ontario Hydro shall have a block of 500 kwh at 0.8* per kwh inserted in the rate schedule ir 

mediately following the second block. 
* 'Applicable only to existing separately billed electric heating services in apartment buildings and to separately meter 

electric heating in farm homes. 
"Existing 2-wire services only. 
•All-electric rate for customers having an approved metered, electric water-heater and using electricity as the s< 

source of energy for home heating and cooking. 





C 

%\ 

b o 


Balance of Kilowatt-Hours per Month at 

Kwh Rate Shown 

(+ indicates all additional) 


Demand 
Charge 


p 
tc 

II 

2 & 






Class and 
Designation 


First 50 kw per 
month — no charge 
Balance -$ per kw 


Net Monthly 

Charge 

Under 50 kw 

for 




3.1* 


2.6* 


1.55* 


1.35* 


0.55* 


0.44* 


0.33* 


250 kwh 


500 k 


General 

SINGLE-PHASE 

• 1G2 A 

1G1 A 

THREE-PHASE 

1G3 A 


$2.75 
$3.25 

$8.25 

$2.75 
$7.75 


200 
200 


200 


1000 
1000 

1000 


+ 
8750 

8750 


+ 
190,000 


800,000 


+ 


$1.90 
$1.90 

$1.90 
$1.90 


$2.75 
$3.25® 

$8.25® 

$2.75® 
$7.75® 


$7.95 
$9.45 

$14.45 

$ 8.15 
$13.15 


$11. 

$13. 

$18. 

$11 
$16 




Balance of Kwh per Month at * per Kwh 
(+ indicates all additional) 


Farm 

SINGLE-PHASE 
lFl" 

THREE-PHASE 
1F3" 


2.7* 


1.5* 


1.3* 


0.55* 


200 
200 


500 
500 


9250 
9250 


+ 
+ 



•Existing 2-wire services only. 
AU Upon application to the Commission, customers having one or more approved electric water-heaters, 
with tank and element sizes acceptable to Ontario Hydro, may have a block of 500 kwh inserted in the 
rate schedule immediately following the second block, at 0.94 per kwh for General and 0.84 for Farm. 
The third block would then be reduced by 500 kwh from the figure shown. 

• Plus 25* per kw for each kw in excess of 50, established as a peak during the previous 11 months, or 
such minimum as may be required. 



SUPPLEMENT 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 



RETAIL service in cities, towns, and villages, and in certain of the more dense- 
ly populated township areas in the province is provided for the most part 
| by the 354 municipal electrical utilities associated with the Commission's East 
and West Systems. In 28 other communities, including towns, townships, and 
villages, the Commission owns and operates distribution facilities serving retail 
customers directly. Both types of retail service are brought together in this supple- 
ment to the Commission's Report since, as municipal operations, they are similar 
in every respect except administration. The table and graphs that immediately 
follow, therefore, cover three major classes of service provided during 1968 in 
382 communities where a total of 1,741,144 customers were served, 1,709,111 
by the municipal electrical utilities and 32,033 by the Commission. 

The statistics on retail service in general are followed by a commentary on 
the municipal electrical utilities in particular. The tabular statements that form 
the remainder of the supplement give information on financial operations, rates, 
consumption, and average cost per kilowatt-hour. Statements A and B include a 

. balance sheet and an operating statement for each of the municipal electrical 
utilities, and Statements C and D provide more general statistics for all 382 
communities. The population figures quoted are for the most part those given in 
the Municipal Directory for 1969, published by the Department of Municipal 

\ Affairs of the Province of Ontario. 

The general rate was used by the Commission and the municipal utilities for 
former industrial power and commercial services in 99 of the communities listed 
in Statements C and D. The number of customers billed on this rate schedule 

145 



146 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electrical Service 
CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, AND CONSUMPTION 

1959 to 1968 













Monthly 














Consump- 


Average 












tion per 


Cost 


Class of Service 


Year 


Revenue 


Consumption 


*Customers 


Customer 


per Kwh 






$ 


kwh 




kwh 


t 


Residential 


1959 


73,955,229 


6,540,969,291 


1,194,878 


456 


1.13 




1960 


78,337,615 


6,944,659,090 


1,234,903 


469 


1.13 




1961 


83,682,550 


7,400,028,084 


1,307,893 


472 


1.13 




1962 


89,016,406 


7,852,651,665 


1,346,408 


486 


1.13 




1963 


93,121,018 


8,255,600,930 


1,382,270 


498 


1.13 




1964 


98,724,259 


8,742,950,806 


1,434,174 


508 


1.13 




1965 


106,738,283 


9,423,405,257 


1,475,590 


532 


1.13 




1966 


114,462,536 


10,102,582,788 


1,505,780 


559 


1.13 




1967 


123,236,091 


10,796,826,704 


1,540,505 


584 


1.14 




1968 


137,250,772 


11,531,567,252 


1,565,268 


619 


1.19 


Commercial 


1959 


38,079,501 


2,669,327,226 


120,733 


1,842 


1.43 




1960 


41,229,320 


2,921,670,317 


123,441 


1,972 


1.41 




1961 


45,718,484 


3,289,119,534 


122,863 


2,231 


1.39 




1962 


49,438,348 


3,633,872,392 


121,964 


2,483 


1.36 




1963 


53,130,394 


3,983,332,309 


123,296 


2,692 


1.33 




1964 


58,244,181 


4,460,958,590 


125,555 


2,961 


1.31 




1965 


64,558,257 


4,988,713,185 


127,645 


3,257 


1.29 




1966 


72,309,441 


5,705,565,474 


132,270 


3,595 


1.27 




1967 


81,101,116 


6,450,509,342 


140,087 


3,837 


1.26 




1968 


92,745,351 


7,254,645,414 


151,017 


4,154 


1.28 


Industrial Power. 


1959 


61,167,603 


7,052,152,034 


23,545 


24,960 


0.87 




1960 


64,057,506 


7,326,683,025 


23,613 


25,857 


0.87 




1961 


69,215,271 


7,994,001,074 


23,179 


28,740 


0.87 




1962 


74,198,657 


8,704,987,001 


23,145 


31,342 


0.85 




1963 


79,740,870 


9,581,875,552 


23,456 


34,042 


0.83 




1964 


86,451,270 


10,488,380,325 


23,866 


36,622 


0.82 




1965 


95,988,774 


11,668,654,346 


23,675 


41,072 


0.82 




1966 


100,320,320 


12,077,932,115 


23,999 


41,939 


0.83 




1967 


106,988,141 


12,594,313,013 


24,560 


42,733 


0.85 




1968 


120,284,786 


13,708.827,688 


24,859 


46,233 


0.88 


f General Rate 


1967 


30,517,324 


3,262,998,579 


27,566 


9,864 


0.94 




1968 


49,510,529 


5,110,730,469 


48,825 


11,150 


0.97 



Note: Kwh consumption figures for residential and commercial services in the above table reflect the 
use of flat-rate water heaters for a uniform average of 16.8 hours per day. 

* Irregular variations from year to year in numbers of customers result from reclassifications from 
commercial to residential and from industrial power to commercial service. 

f The general rate is applicable to all former commercial, small commercial, and industrial power 
service customers. At the end of 1966, only two municipal electrical utilities had adopted the new 
rate but this number had increased to thirty-six by the end of 1967 and ninety-nine by the end of 
1968, showing a ready acceptance for this type of rate structure. While the general rate is shown as 
a separate classification in the table above, for purposes of continuity of trends in costs and usage, 
the same data relating to revenue, energy, and customers, have also been proportionately allocated 
to the former categories of commercial and industrial power service. 



Commencing in 1968, the method of calculating the monthly consumption per customer was 
changed. The new formula uses the average of the numbers of customers served at the end of the 
current year and the previous year. 






Energy Consumption and Average Cost per Kilowatt-Hour 



147 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

ANNUAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND AVERAGE COST PER KILOWATT-HOUR 



BILLION KWI- 
40 - 



TOTAL ANNUAL ENERGY 
CONSUMPTION 



COMMERCIAL SERVICE 

BILLION KWH CENTS PER KWH 
40 8 2.0 



ANNUAL CONSUMPTION 

(Includes street lighting) 



T 

1965 



— 30 6 



AVERAGE COST 




ANNUAL CONSUMPTION 



T 

1955 



T 

I960 



r 

1965 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



CENTS PER KWH 
3.0 



BILLION KWH 
12 



NDUSTRIAL POWER 
SERVICE 



ANNUAL CONSUMPTION 



AVERAGE 
COST 

J 



I 

1960 



ANNUAL CONSUMPTION 



AVERAGE 
COST 




T 

1960 



CENTS 
PER KW^ 

- 30 



148 



Municipal Electrical Service 



numbered 48,825 at the end of the year. For purposes of comparison with earlier 
years when this rate was not in effect, these customers have also been included 
in the other services roughly in proportion to the former ratios of these services. 
On the basis of this reclassification of customers, revenue, and consumption, any 
year-to-year comparisons must of necessity be rough approximations. 

MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL UTILITIES 

The total assets of the 354 municipal electrical utilities served under cost 
contracts in 1968 amounted to $1,140,105,341 after the deduction of accumulat- 
ed depreciation of $200,212,484. The increase of $72,591,150 includes an in- 
crease of $25,757,265 in the utilities' equity in Ontario Hydro systems. This 
equity, amounting to $464,803,659 at the end of 1968, is the sum of the annual 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL UTILITIES 

FIXED ASSETS AND LONG-TERM DEBT 

MILLION 
DOLLARS 




"~ 1 




"I 

- - - 600 

- - - 500 

- - - 400 


n 


FIXED ASSETS AT COS 


T 




I—, 


r-i 






r-| 














r— i E 


r-i 














LONG-TERM 

DEBT •..*. 


-♦-♦-♦- a 
















\ 

194 


5 


■Hjtrrn 

1950 


I 

1955 19 


1 

60 196 


5 





















Municipal Electrical Utilities 



49 



contributions made by the utilities under a provision specifically designated in 
their cost of power for the retirement of the Commission's borrowings. The equity 
in 1968 represented 40.8 per cent of the total assets of the utilities, and each 
utility's share in the total equity, its contributions plus interest, is shown in State- 
ment A. These utility equities and their sum differ from the amounts shown on 
the Commission's balance sheet and in the schedule of equities accumulated 
through debt retirement charges only because the Commission's schedule is not 
available when the utilities close their books at the end of the year. The figures 
shown in Statement A are, with very few exceptions, those as at the end of 1967 
rather than 1968. 

The investment of the municipal electrical utilities in fixed assets at cost in- 
creased by $52,460,369 during 1968 to a total of $759,163,167. The net re- 
quirement on outside sources to meet this substantial increase was $8,242,833. 



,1 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL UTILITIES 



REVENUE 



MILLION 
DOLLARS 



400 



350 



300 



250 



200 



/ 



Totaly' 



T 



/ 



7 



/ 



/ 



/ 



7^ 



150 



100 



—/■ Industrial- 



Residential service, ' 




MILLION 
DOLLARS 



1945 



Street lighting - ..«.« 
'•- ,-, *~"*""and Other 
1 

1965 



400 



350 



300 



200 



150 



100 



150 Municipal Electrical Service 

With debentures outstanding amounting to $108,216,271, and $11,969,393 in 
sinking fund on debentures already provided for redemption of this debt, the 
utilities' net long-term debt relative to fixed assets at cost was 12.7 per cent at the 
end of 1968, as compared with 12.6 per cent at the end of 1967. 

Total revenues of the municipal electrical utilities were up by 12.4 per cent, 
rising to $366,932,874. These revenues were derived as shown in the following 
table: 

Residential Service $134,729,564 

Commercial Service 75,358,793 

Industrial Power Service 95,070,121 

General 40,664,413 

Street Lighting 10,157,306 



Total 355,980,197 

Miscellaneous 10,952,677 



Total Revenues $366,932,874 

The total expenses of the utilities rose by 13.3 per cent to $346,779,746, 
leaving a margin of net revenue of $20,153,128, which was 5.5 per cent of total 
revenues as compared with 6.3 per cent in 1967. 

The Commission regards such a margin of net income as an economical 
source of funds for use by the municipal utilities in the normal expansion of their 
systems. This is particularly true under present conditions of excessively high 
interest rates on borrowed funds. The margin also provides a stabilizing factor in 
the process of retail rate adjustment. This is taken into consideration in all re- 
views of municipal utility retail rates. The Commission, as required by The Power 
Commission Act, exercises supervisory control over the activities of the municipal 
electrical utilities, and their rates to ultimate customers are subject to the Com- 
mission's review and approval. 

The books of account from which the foregoing financial information is de- 
rived are kept by the utilities in accordance with a standard accounting system 
designed by the Commission for use by all its municipal electric-utility customers. 
These records are periodically inspected by the Commission's municipal account- 
ants. From time to time adjustments and improvements in accounting procedure 
and office routine are recommended as required. By providing this type of assist- 
ance and supervision, the Commission seeks to ensure the correct application of 
rates and standard procedures and the observance of a uniform classification of 
revenues and expenditures. The work carried out by the Commission's municipal 
accountants on the utilities' behalf does not, however, constitute an audit of their 
accounts. The municipalities must make their own arrangements for this audit. 






MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 



Statistical Tables 



STATEMENTS A and 

Financial Statements of the Municipal Electrical Utilities Page 

Consolidated for Years 1959 to 1968 152 

By Municipalities 154 

STATEMENT C— 

Rates and Typical Bills for Electrical Service Provided by the 354 Municipal Electrical 

Utilities and by Commission-owned Distribution Facilities in 28 Towns and Villages 204 

STATEMENT D— 

Cutomers, Revenue, and Consumption in Municipalities Served by the 354 Municipal 
Electrical Utilities and by Commission-owned Distribution Facilities in 28 Towns and 
Villages 228 



151 



152 



Municipal Electrical Service 

MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL UTILITIES 



Year 


1959 

354 


1960 
354 


1961 
354 




Number of Municipal Utilities Included 


355 


A. BALANCE SHEET 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


$ 
385,419,306 
77,551,575 


$ 
413,611,989 
82,246,973 


$ 
457,392,623 
100,165,249 


488,393,074 
109,914,757 


Less accumulated depreciation 


Net fixed assets 


307,867,731 
10,400,010 


331,365,016 
12,250,801 


357,227,374 
15.105,454 


378,478,317 
18,063,961 


CURRENT ASSETS 


— long term 


15,560,183 
13,463,791 


13,990,120 
12,868,807 


14,672,152 
14,190,953 


16,984,376 
15 807 380 


Other 
















39,423,984 

9,381,215 
1,726,182 
2,421,279 


39,109,728 

9,197,511 
2,316,958 
2,553,588 


43,968,559 

9,590,459 
3,261,509 
2,643,494 


50,855,717 
9,742,156 


OTHER ASSETS 


Sinking fund on debentures 


4,312,070 
2,715 626 








13,528,676 
238,790,589 


14,068,057 
261,101,650 


15,495,462 
282,255,861 


16 769,852 


Equity in Ontario Hydro 


305,826,987 


Total 


599,610,980 


645,644,451 


698,947,256 


751,930,873 


LIABILITIES 


70,456,844 

10,589,995 

6,565,031 


74,429,684 

10,485,382 

7,146,524 


81,812,075 

12,594,844 

7,860,946 


83 167 367 




12,753,744 
8,254 687 








Total liabilities 


87,611,870 

238,790,589 
2,864,918 


92,061,590 

261,101,650 
2,920,005 


102,267,865 

282,255,861 
2,468,637 


104,175 798 


RESERVES 


305,826,987 




2,481,991 








241,655,507 

77,881,620 
1,726,182 

190,444,985 


264,021,655 

81,266,027 
2,316,958 

205,984,657 


284,724,498 

84,572,157 
3,261,509 

224,121,227 


308,308,978 


CAPITAL 


88,386,510 
4,312,070 

246,747,517 




Accumulated net income invested ir 
plant or held as working funds . 


Frequency standardization expense 


290,816 


6,436 














270,343,603 


289,561,206 


311,954,893 


339,446,097 




Total 


599,610,980 


645,644,451 


698,947,256 


751,930,873 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 

Miscellaneous 


175,686,813 
2,400,070 


186,599,701 
2,720,870 


201,891,409 
3,274,114 


216,412,017 
4,439,792 




178,086,883 


189,320,571 


205,165,523 


220,851,809 




EXPENSE 


111,160,867 

531,076 

17,065,080 

14,954,828 

6,824,770 

10,030,350 

14,316 


122,634,361 

536,118 

18,273,164 

15,766,246 

7,440,556 

10,750,710 

22,506 


130,857,200 

529,955 

19,486,528 

17,342.308 

8,203,772 

11,466,692 

81,734 


139,291,682 

570,500 

20,760,837 

18.482,105 

8,912,277 

1 1 ,655,654 

73,080 


Local generation 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 




Total expense 


160,581,287 


175,423,661 


187,968,189 


199,746,135 




17,505,596 


13,896,910 


17,197,334 


21,105,674 






1,310,099 


1.351,915 


1.423,427 


1 ,460,553 







Statements A and B 

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 1959-1968 



153 



1963 

355 


1964 

357 


1965 
360 


1966 

358 


1967 

355 


1968 
354 


$ 
523,032,765 
120,564,846 


$ 
564,408.772 
133,554.046 


$ 
607,675,682 
148,250,022 


$ 
654,128,175 
164,122,993 


$ 
706,702,798 
182,315,075 


$ 
759,163,167 
200,212,484 


402,467,919 
19,175,569 


430,854,726 
22,394,390 


459,425,660 
29,195.624 


490,005,182 

12.138.312 

19.530,448 

9,515,323 

23,415,599 


524.387.723 

11,784.458 
21,164,511 

9,039.413 
23.168,868 

1.834.703 


558,950,683 

11,554,954 
27,957,092 

8,252,468 
27,549,947 

1,488,012 


16.225,459 

15,572,525 


13,290,755 
16,566,500 


9,749.732 
18.398.616 










50,973,553 

10,351.372 
5.442.451 
3,235.378 


52,251,645 

10,878.773 
6.626,453 
6,505.335 


57,343.972 

12,648,044 
7,740.863 
8,782,008 


64,599,682 

14,192,035 
9,073,286 
10,162,656 


66,941,953 

15.803.084 
11.099.516 
10,185.521 


76,802,473 

15,883,122 
11,969,393 
11,696,011 


19.029.201 
329.924,857 


24,010,561 
354,153,351 


29,170,915 
378.707.011 


33,427,977 
406,329,792 


37,088,121 
439,046,394 


39,548,526 
464,803,659 


802,395,530 


861,270,283 


924,647,558 


994,362,633 


1,067,514,191 


1,140,105,341 


82,865,177 
12,860,334 
8.534,095 


87,951,607 
14,627,872 
9,799,228 


92.106,967 
17.815.810 
10.515.302 


97,299,929 
21,534,264 
10,693,822 


99,973,438 

28,417,741 

8,671,660 


108,216,271 
40,797,753 
13,611,744 


104,259,606 

329,924.857 
2.323,811 


112,378,707 

354,153,351 
2,251,343 


120.438,079 

378,707,011 
2,156,022 


129,528,015 

406,329,792 
1,842,605 


137,062,839 

439,046,394 
1,458,579 


162,625,768 

464,803,659 
1,338,735 


332.248.668 

92.400.155 
5,442,451 

258,763.652 
9,280,998 


356,404,694 

96,501,461 
6,626,453 

278,077,894 
11,281,074 


380,863,033 

101,145,958 
7,740,863 

300,558,283 
13,901,342 


408,172,397 

105,895,961 
9,073,286 

323,795,867 
17,897,107 


440,504,973 

110,647,680 
11,099,516 

345,444,966 
22,754,217 


466,142,394 

116,735,092 
11,969,393 

355,282,175 
27,350,519 














365,887,256 


392,486,882 


423,346,446 


456,662,221 


489,946,379 


511,337,179 


802,395.530 


861,270,283 


924,647,558 


994,362,633 


1,067,514,191 


1,140,105,341 


230.166,226 
5,324,613 


247,890,291 
6,108,283 


272,214,069 
7,176,496 


292,499,953 
8,640,589 


316,856,666 
9,690,237 


355,980,197 
10,952,677 


235,490,839 


253,998.574 


279,390,565 


301,140,542 


326,546,903 


J66,932,874 


152,433.112 

572.079 

21,989,333 

19.550.879 

9,135,950 

12,557,510 

76,738 


167,184,292 

564,5 56 

23,527,954 

20,367,906 

9,678,755 

13,486,318 

26.460 


184,480,710 
571,767 
21,920,862 
21,816,697 
10.222,785 
17,744,672 
78,450 


201,058,552 
612,063 
23,123,145 
23,762,160 
11,045,582 
19,352.182 
92,300 


220,454,314 
708,788 
25.552,916 
26,050,076 
12,131.296 
21,137,680 
57.309 


252,555,717 
749,020 
28,713,279 
29,316,059 
13,359,494 
22,018,755 
67,422 


216,315.601 


234.836,221 


256.835.943 


279,045,984 


306,092,379 


346,779,746 


19,175 238 


19,162,353 


22,554,622 


22,094,558 


20,454,524 


20,153,128 


1,497.857 


1.552,238 


1,595,343 


1.630,255 


1,673.104 


1,709,111 



154 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 

















Municipality 

Population 


Acton 
4,604 


Ailsa Craig 
558 


Ajax 
10,331 


Alexandria 
2,953 


Alfred 
1,110 


Alliston 
3,214 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


662,280 
143,116 


66,506 
7,247 


1,487,484 
481,960 


486,266 
145,150 


107,181 
39,402 


425,558 
124,271 


Less accumulated depreciation 


Net fixed assets 


519,164 

39,350 

50,000 

3,000 

16,075 


59,259 
14,831 

159 
110 


1,005,524 

92,499 

850 
31,117 

2,526 


341,116 

8,847 

3,000 

5,161 

160 


67,779 

16,778 
7,000 

926 
762 


301,287 

2,063 
15,000 
13,000 

9,458 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 




Accounts receivable (net) 

Other 




108,425 
1,517 


15,100 


126,992 

32,508 

5,054 


17,168 

22,068 

4,291 


25,466 
519 


39,521 
5,741 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 






Total other assets 


1,517 
611,788 


65,832 


37,562 
386,148 


26,359 
261,588 


519 
33,810 


5,741 
268,388 


Equity in Ontario Hydro 




Total 


1,240,894 


140,191 


1,556,226 


646,231 


127,574 


614,93 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 

Current liabilities 


35,200 

40,102 

6,607 


4,263 
292 


383,916 
84,861 
51,557 


48,700 
24,225 
14,326 


16,500 

6,413 

706 


21,40< 

6,00! 


Other liabilities 




Total liabilities 


81,909 
611,788 


4,555 
65,832 


520,334 
386,148 


87,251 
261,588 


23,619 
33,810 


27,405] 

268,381 


RESERVES 


Other Reserves 






Total reserves 


611,788 
48,739 

479,089 
19,369 


65,832 
6,884 

62,920 


386,148 
193,964 

383,154 
72,626 


261,588 
54,377 

239,508 
3,507 


33,810 
21,500 

46,942 
1,703 


268,38: 
29,99 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 

Sinking fund debentures 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


287,15 
2,00 


Total capital 


547,197 


69,804 


649,744 


297,392 


70,145 


319,14 


Total 


1,240,894 


140,191 


1,556,226 


646,231 


127,574 


614,93 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 
REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


352,520 
9,397 


25,994 
408 


724,746 
17,413 


216,503 
10,919 


59,346 
862 


237 34 


Miscellaneous 


8,1; 




Total revenue 


361,917 


26,402 


742,159 


227,422 


60,208 


245, 4* 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


250,968 

33,303 

24,159 

5,945 

16,664 


18,559 

786 
2,036 

1,763 


500,387 

38,147 
60,107 
49,435 
45,386 


165,721 

16,576 

19,119 

4,551 

15,524 


43,041 

1,578 
5,359 
2,807 
3,623 


172,01 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 


21,7 
25,2. 

9,8 


Total expense 


331,039 


23,144 


693,462 


221,491 


56,408 


228,9 


Net income net expense 


30,878 


3,258 


48,697 


5,931 


3,800 


16,5 






Number of customers 


1,551 


237 


3,036 


1,122 


368 


1,2 
\ 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



155 



Almonte 
3,518 


Alvinston 
637 


Amherst- 
burg 

4,616 


Ancaster 
Twp. 

15,183 


Apple Hill 

325 


Arkona 
419 


Arnprior 
5,728 


Arthur 
1,271 


Athens 
1,021 


579,359 
155,992 


92,393 
34,609 


682,433 
184,315 


350,204 
102,273 


31,553 
11,616 


59,104 
21,961 


722,455 
186,534 


190,281 
48,450 


94,109 
25,067 


423,367 
32,771 

13,000 

2,222 


57,784 

4,438 

5,000 
554 
576 


498,118 

21,221 

18,000 
7,165 


247,931 

1,264 
100,000 

3,572 
256 


19,937 
8,205 

16 
105 


37,143 

8,357 

10,582 

6,000 

2,037 

239 


535,921 

27,724 
12,000 

4,414 


141,831 

14,963 

10,000 
1,203 


69,042 

333 

7,640 
2,595 


47,993 

2,247 


10,568 

44 


46,386 
17,136 


105,092 

719 

5,686 


8,326 


27,215 


44,138 
6,249 


26,166 

130 

1,229 


10,568 
4,083 


2,247 
144,913 


44 
68,451 


17,136 
492,015 


6,405 
235,822 


19,188 


50,816 


6,249 
446,901 


1,359 
117,757 


4,083 
61,175 


, 618,520 


136,847 


1,053,655 


595,250 


47,451 


115,174 


1,033,209 


287,113 


144,868 


11,792 
2,508 


3,109 
165 


22,326 
3,854 


30,300 

15,776 

2,980 


714 
114 


1,405 
18 


30,843 

40,442 

7,653 


32,800 

8,137 

864 


9,969 

433 


14,300 
144,913 


3,274 
68,451 


26,180 
492,015 


49,056 

235,822 


828 
19,188 


1,423 
50,816 


78,938 

446,901 
942 


41,801 

117,757 


10,402 
61,175 


144,913 
72,000 

385,696 
< 1.6H 


68,451 
23,530 

40,431 
1,161 


492,015 
68,237 

459,893 
7,330 


235,822 
97,946 

210,493 
1,933 


19,188 
5,080 

22,355 


50,816 
13,113 

49,822 


447,843 
114,401 

367,254 
24,773 


117,757 
26,114 

101,441 


61,175 
12,988 

58,989 
1,314 


| 459,307 


65,122 


535,460 


310,372 


27,435 


62,935 


506,428 


127,555 


73,291 


■ 618^20 


136,847 


1,053,655 


595,250 


47,451 


115,174 


1,033,209 


287,113 


144,868 


180,659 
1,618 


25,538 
458 


339,795 
6,461 


194,980 
7,385 


9,814 
385 


20,302 
1,040 


405,526 
15,691 


70,957 
924 


41,817 
660 


• 

182,277 


25,996 


346,256 


202,365 


10,199 


21,342 


421,217 


71,881 


42,477 


• 

110,590 
15,377 
10,281 
26,348 

14,914 


14,925 

4,516 

4,841 

3,191 


242,800 

25,611 
36,864 

16,515 


132,634 

16,434 

18,240 

5,479 

10,343 


6,861 

462 
1,367 

1,108 


14,558 

1,218 
1,514 

1,987 


338,572 

24,373 

26,664 

5,290 

27,854 


47,254 

7,896 
6,667 
1,012 
5,422 


32,436 

3,620 
3,215 

2,790 


177,510 


27,473 


321,790 


183,130 


9,798 


19,277 


422,753 


68,251 


42,061 


'_ 4,767 


1,477 


24,466 


19,235 


401 


2,065 


1,536 


3,630 


416 


1,213 


341 


1,577 


1,169 


120 


203 


1,961 


557 


389 



156 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Municipality 

Population 


Atikokan 
6,178 


Aurora 
10,662 


Avonmore 
229 


Aylmer 
4,452 


Ayr 

1,178 


Baden 
946 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


650,717 
246,254 


1,208,415 
274,155 


30,761 
13,681 


537,791 
197,188 


130,482 

27,572 


111,769 
35,430 


Less accumulated depreciation 


Net fixed assets 


404,463 

13,139 

70,000 

16,270 
20,000 


934,260 

300 
50,000 
34,000 
13,743 


17,080 
9,982 

1,295 


340,603 
44,102 

7,770 


102,910 
3,047 

488 


76,339 
20,647 

276 
53 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


-long term 

Accounts receivable (net) 


Other 


Total current assets 


119,409 
10,888 
13,062 


98,043 

652 

4,821 


11,277 
527 


51,872 

1,126 

517 


3,535 
80 


20,976 j 
215 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 




Total other assets 


23,950 
309,053 


5,473 
452,048 


527 
11,716 


1,643 
482,395 


80 
108,332 


215 
153,113 | 






Total 


856,875 


1,489,824 


40,600 


876,513 


214,857 


250,643 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


207,000 
39,460 
24,655 


168,000 

76,444 

7,084 


9,500 
1,160 


14,000 

27,481 

3,090 


5,302 
808 






4,664 
306 


Other liabilities 






Total liabilities 


271,115 
309,053 


251,528 
452,048 


10,660 
11,716 


44,571 
482,395 


6,110 

108,332 


4,970 
153,113 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro 


Other reserves 






309,053 
193,000 

64,883 
18,824 


452,048 
54,911 

680,473 
50,864 


11,716 
4,500 

13,724 


482,395 
74,702 

274,845 


108,332 
17,503 

82,352 
560 


153,113 
5,000 

87,560 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


Sinking fund debentures 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


Total capital 


276,707 


786,248 


18,224 


349,547 


100,415 


92,560 


Total 


856,875 


1,489,824 


40,600 


876,513 


214,857 


250,643 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


313,020 
15,782 


530,464 
32,421 


14,527 
299 


301,205 
2,308 


70,177 
979 


58,769 
474 


Miscellaneous 


Total revenue 


328,802 


562,885 


14,826 


303,513 


71,156 


59,243 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


178,322 

34,014 
51,673 
35,211 
25,436 


407,712 

31,872 
43,445 
19,619 
31,232 


8,329 

682 
1,523 
1,039 
1,094 


238,448 

17,133 

20,402 

5,035 

15,187 


51,167 

5,675 
7,675 

3,823 


44,171 

2,737 
6,485 

3,737 


Local generation 

Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 




Total expense 


324,656 


533,880 


12,667 


296,205 


68,340 


57,130 


Net income net expense 


4,146 


29,005 


2,159 


7,308 


2,816 


2,113 


Number of customers 


1,813 1 


3,130 


115 


1,681 


437 


306 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



157 



Bancroft 
2,220 


Barrie 
25,481 


Barry's Bay 
1,451 


Bath 

752 


Beachburg 
559 


Beachville 
982 


Beamsville 
4047 


Beaverton 
1,207 


Beeton 
998 


457,075 
148,948 


3,296,978 
1,110,008 


131,330 
28,543 


102,393 
27,943 


74,256 
31,100 


151,500 
56,385 


403,679 
122,591 


208,693 
51,262 


96,571 
22,691 


308,127 

9,234 
15,000 

11,198 

272 


2,186,970 
175 

60,131 
1,258 


102,787 
829 

905 
800 


74,450 

8,476 
15,000 

1,304 
450 


43,156 
11,503 

8,000 

327 


95,115 

11,560 

65,588 
1,532 


281,088 
17,825 

1,622 


157,431 

4,764 

10,000 

1,809 

970 


73,880 

12,766 

10,000 
854 


35,704 

594 

1,741 


61,564 

64,768 

9,588 


2,534 


25,230 
450 


19,830 
1,465 


78,680 


19,447 


17,543 

125 

5,105 


23,620 
286 


2,335 

97,225 


74,356 
1,881,678 


35,922 


450 
36,179 


1,465 
23,670 


293,486 


181,018 


5,230 
148,513 


286 
86,643 


443,391 


4,204,568 


141,243 


136,309 


88,121 


467,281 


481,553 


328,717 


184,429 


28,000 
9,161 
2,643 


263,000 

107,938 

27,717 


9,630 
369 


4,000 

3,118 

786 


37,900 

1,926 

135 


12,024 
720 


15,810 

3,532 


7,491 
1,170 


3,536 
966 


39,804 
97,225 


398,655 
1,881,678 


9,999 

35,922 


7,904 
36,179 


39,961 
23,670 


12,744 
293,486 


19,342 
181,018 


8,661 
148,513 


4,502 
86,643 


97,225 
104,500 

192,477 
9,385 


1,881,678 
88,366 

1,815,094 

20,775 


35,922 
7,500 

85,158 
2,664 


36,179 
13,500 

66,304 

12,422 


23,670 
14,100 

10,390 


293,486 
5,537 

153,904 
1,610 


181,018 
37,500 

243,646 
47 


148,513 
12,839 

158,704 


86,643 
13,610 

79,674 


306,362 


1,924,235 


95,322 


92,226 


24,490 


161,051 


281,193 


171,543 


93,284 


443,391 


4,204,568 


141,243 


136,309 


88,121 


467,281 


481,553 


328,717 


184,429 


126,271 
6,746 


1,723,579 
47,470 


55,255 
305 


33,327 
985 


30,751 

522 


119,806 
5,668 


193,129 
6,249 


94,033 
2,066 


39,421 
2,100 


133,017 


1,771,049 


55,560 


34,312 


31,273 


125,474 


199,378 


96,099 


41,521 


78,346 
5,248 
8,672 

14,360 
6,826 

16,334 


1,272,313 

138,060 

124,895 

19,745 

119,984 


43,789 

2,888 
6,422 

3,776 


23,865 

1,572 

3,434 

747 

3,182 


18,971 

766 

2,174 
4,553 
2,487 


114,681 

3,037 
4,785 

5,715 


130,223 

13,946 

13,321 

780 

14,529 


64,458 

6,742 
7,813 

6,888 


29,310 

2,013 
2,714 

3,346 


129,786 


1,674,997 


56,875 


32,800 


28,95 1 


128,218 


172,799 


85,901 


37,383 


3,231 


96,052 


1,315 


1,512 


2,322 


2,744 


26,579 


10,198 


4,138 


815 


8,881 


473 


279 


224 


338 


1,395 


645 


354 



158 


Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical 


Utilities Financial 




Municipality 


Belle 
River 
2,549 


Belleville 
32,908 


Belmont 
750 


Blenheim 
3,301 


Bloomfield 
714 


Blyth 
779 




Population 








A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


230,409 
39,257 


4,532,845 
1,159,413 


95,312 
30,335 


445,710 
127,310 


72,331 
32,653 


109,979 
35,461 




Less accumulated depreciation 




Net fixed assets 


191,152 

2,286 

7,000 
1,257 


3,373,432 

325,000 
73,121 


64,977 

9,292 

10,000 

9,650 

1,270 

555 


318,400 

12,520 
25,000 

6,964 


39,678 

12,406 
3,500 
3,992 
2,106 


74,518 

2,260 

7,000 

2,591 

480 




CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 




Investments-short term 




—long term 




Accounts receivable (net) 

Other 








Total current assets 


10,543 
1,463 


398,121 
71,489 
11,664 


30,767 
4,758 


44,484 

3,333 

501 


22,004 


12,331 
14 




OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 








Total other assets 


1,463 
106,439 


83,153 
2,450,529 


4,758 
35,182 


3,834 

247,521 


62,720 


14 

94,470 




Equity in Ontario Hydro 








Total 


309,597 


6,305,235 


135,684 


614,239 


124,402 


181,333 




LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 

Current liabilities 


21,648 
1,275 


719,000 

265,041 

49,599 


46,500 

9,288 

508 


7,488 

14,159 

3,775 


2,458 
544 


4,710 
189 




Other liabilities 








Total liabilities 


22,923 
106,439 


1,033,640 
2,450,529 


56,296 
35,182 


25,422 
247,521 


3,002 
62,720 


4,899 
94,470 




RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro 




Other reserves 








Total reserves 


106,439 
19,555 

158,530 
2,150 


2,450,529 
310,997 

2,451,279 
58,790 


35,182 
7,099 

35,286 
1,821 


247,521 
91,692 

249,604 


62,720 
9,797 

48,883 


94,470 
16,033 

65,931 




CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 




Sinking fund debentures 




Accumulated net income invested in 
Contributed capital 




Total capital 


180,235 


2,821,066 


44,206 


341,296 


58,680 


81,964 




Total 


309,597 


6,305,235 


135,684 


614,239 


124,402 


181,333 




B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


112,103 
1,631 


1,894,703 
108,040 


75,182 
3,596 


177,684 
2,633 


35,545 
608 


54,359 
1,286 




Miscellaneous 




Total revenue 


113,734 


2,002,743 


78,778 


180,317 


36,153 


55,645 








EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


69,383 

10,553 

14,209 

205 

5,972 


1,282,459 

144,126 

186,570 

71,755 

138,359 


58,673 

4,420 
4,553 
4,750 
4,023 


111,036 

12,514 

25,954 

3,785 

12,805 


25,104 

3,415 
3,730 

2,511 


43,146 

5,557 
3,045 

4,073 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation 




Other 




.Total expense 


100,322 


1,823,269 


76,419 


166,094 


34,760 


55,821 




Net income net expense 


13,412 


179,474 


2,359 


14,223 


1,393 


176 








Number of customers 


904 


11,496 


256 


1,282 


294 


353 





Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



159 





















Bobcaygeon 
1,244 


Bolton 
2,390 


Bothwell 
860 


Bowman- 
ville 

8,442 


Br aceb ridge 
3,260 


Bradford 

2,771 


Brae side 
490 


Brampton 
37,324 


Brantford 
60,140 


283,341 
100,349 


232,912 
70,346 


111,174 
40,749 


1,022,796 
428,506 


1,061,429 
321,406 


404,848 
120,229 


54,531 
11,269 


6,046,977 
1,186,788 


7,666,504 
2,214,107 


182,992 
6,422 

2,959 
500 


162,566 
5,882 

4,907 
29 


70,425 
9,715 

1,360 


594,290 

19,781 
40,000 
59,530 
16,154 
1,001 


740,023 

19,625 
14,720 


284,619 
7,099 

12,390 
1,410 


43,262 

7,058 

15,000 
1,266 


4,860,189 
59,408 

668,825 
162 


5,452,397 

28,217 
100,000 

155,637 
7,407 


9,881 
4,346 
4,390 


10,818 
14,200 


11,075 
530 


136,466 
21,544 
14,181 


34,345 

4,163 

13,470 


20,899 
14,461 
10,655 


23,324 
4,134 


728,395 

223,446 

34,473 


291,261 

138,410 

2,750 


8,736 
71,085 


14,200 
134,759 


530 
76,190 


35,725 
859,983 


17,633 
20,991 


25,116 
203,566 


4,134 
89,435 


257,919 
1,717,701 


141,160 
6,857,092 


272,694 


322,343 


158,220 


1,626,464 


812,992 


534,200 


160,155 


7,564,204 


12,741,910 


63,900 

13,667 

549 


42,916 
14,024 
4,148 


4,331 
88 


48,131 
19,387 


99,099 
15,001 


15,538 
3,148 


8,211 

135 


2,298,280 
952,615 
360,165 


428,493 
280,820 
111,408 


78,116 
71,085 


61,088 
134,759 


4,419 
76,190 


67,518 
859,983 


114,100 
20,991 


18,686 
203,566 


8,346 
89,435 


3,611,060 
1,717,701 


820,721 
6,857,092 


71,085 
25,100 

98,393 


134,759 
38,491 

86,876 
1,129 


76,190 

5,534 

71,927 
150 


859,983 
71,000 

627,963 


20,991 
406,701 

271,200 


203,566 
23,351 

288,597 


89,435 
6,000 

56,374 


1,717,701 
584,886 

1,561,198 
89,359 


6,857,092 
1,266,189 

3,602,851 
195,057 


123,493 


126,496 


77,611 


698,963 


677,901 


311,948 


62,374 


2,235,443 


5,064,097 


272,694 




322,343 


158,220 


1,626,464 


812,992 


534,200 


160,155 


7,564,204 


12,741,910 


106,777 
2,433 


121,849 
3,123 


41,740 
2,134 


504,374 
24,300 


205,892 
7,937 


160,881 

5,735 


80,830 
2,049 


2,426,008 
4,912 


3,660,152 

64,347 


109,210 


124,972 


43,874 


528,674 


213,829 


166,616 


82,879 


2,430,920 


3,724,499 


65,178 

9,307 
12,969 

8,346 
10,293 


84,977 

6,184 

17,859 

5,533 

8,260 


26,119 

3,452 
6,184 

3,970 


418,690 

27,105 
32,781 

39,183 


53,604 
47,873 
25,941 
22,907 
19,397 
28,248 


108,100 

16,159 
18,733 

12,925 


82,826 

1,064 
1,973 

1,902 


1,663,984 

101,753 
127,524 
270,645 
179,678 


2,750,234 

250,665 

210,237 

77,536 

222,057 


106,093 


122,813 


39,725 


517,759 


197,970 


155,917 


87,765 


2,343,584 


3,510,729 


3,117 


2,159 


4,149 


10,915 


15,859 


10,699 


4,886 


87,336 


213,770 


837 


731 


356 


2,831 


1,386 


988 


161 


9,302 


20,332 



160 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Municipality 

Population 


Brantford 
Twp. 
9,214 


Brechin 
236 


Bridgeport 
2,236 


Brigden 
524 


Brighton 

2,729 


Brockville 
19,830 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 


1,653,497 
497,526 


24,009 
7,888 


169,232 
44,391 


69,854 
21,143 


312,374 
67,404 


3,011,520 
772,871 


Less accumulated depreciation 


Net fixed assets 


1,155,971 
62,999 

10,123 


16,121 

4,143 

10,500 
105 


124,841 
9,907 

8,431 


48,711 

4,906 

11,887 
939 

20 


244,970 
4,644 

4,236 
178 


2,238,649 

52,581 

12,000 
36,313 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


Investments-short term 


—long term 




Other 




Total current assets 


73,122 
29,080 


14,748 


18,338 
399 
102 


17,752 
30 
20 


9,058 

12,711 

1,980 


100,894 

62,876 

3,844 


OTHER ASSETS 


Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 




Total other assets 


29,080 
535,634 


26,571 


501 
100,763 


50 

52,723 


14,691 

178,778 


66,720 




1,876,890 




Total 


1,793,807 


57,440 


244,443 


120,236 


447,497 


4,283,153 




LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


280,587 

69,806 

6,246 


692 

217 


14,756 

19,590 

1,943 


1,433 

222 


27,500 

12,345 

3,139 


572,500 

140,017 

1,555 




Other liabilities 






356,639 
535,634 


909 
26,571 


36,289 
100,763 


1,655 
53,723 


42,984 
178,778 


714,072 
1,876,890 


RESERVES 


Other reserves 




Total reserves 


535,634 
274,771 

591,520 
35,243 


26,571 
2,664 

27,296 


100,763 
24,893 

77,330 
5,168 


53,723 
8,000 

56,858 


178,778 
37,500 

185,823 
2,412 


1,876,890 
433,070 

1,221,791 
37,330 


CAPITAL 


Sinking fund debentures 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


Total capital 


901,534 


29,960 


107,391 


64,858 


225,735 


1,692,191 


Total 


1,793,807 


57,440 


244,443 


120,236 


447,497 


4,283,153 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 
REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


699,768 
11,406 


9,632 
501 


112,406 
363 


21,743 
981 


137,953 
3,217 


1,366,345 
53,670 


Miscellaneous 




711,174 


10,133 


112,769 


22,724 


141,170 


1,420,015 jj 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


487,053 

78,857 
37,429 
42,840 
52,730 


7,034 

560 
1,364 

783 


73,751 

9,007 

14,199 

2,586 

4,912 


13,435 

1,282 
2,111 

2,181 


98,798 

10,396 

13,597 

3,452 

8,482 


961,584 

109,778 

118,884 

87,607 

96,709 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 


Total expense 


698,909 


9,741 


104,455 


19,009 


134,725 


1,374,562 




Net income net expense 


12,265 


392 


8,314 


3,715 


6,445 


45,453 




Number of customers 


2,824 j 103 


finn 


?n 


1 120 


6.952 







Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



161 





















Brussels 
836 


Burford 
1,126 


Burgessville 
298 


Burk's Falls 
818 


Burlington 
75,930 


Cache Bay 
658 


Caledonia 
2,944 


Campbell- 
ford 

3,505 


Campbell- 
ville 
258 


118,308 
17,377 


144,986 
51,262 


42,007 
13,003 


101,728 
27,225 


9,048,179 
1,828,985 


63,589 
26,361 


254,137 
79,843 


909,560 
252,461 


27,387 
8,523 


100,931 
13,621 

1,490 


93,724 

3,988 

3,500 
1,268 


29,004 

7,557 

1,500 

126 

36 


74,503 

11,105 

11,690 

2,012 

457 


7,219,194 

123,023 
100,000 

35,000 
226,899 

18,088 


37,228 

4,198 
12,000 
14,000 

2,495 


174,294 
24,074 

2,716 


657,099 

35,000 

8,076 
471 


18,864 

7,387 

2,466 
729 


15,111 


8,756 
71 


9,219 


25,264 
14 


503,010 

159,316 

68,172 


32,693 

769 

1,859 


26,790 
559 


43,547 
17,280 

2,431 


10,582 


173 
103,281 


71 
108,192 


32,436 


14 
52,891 


227,488 
2,249,991 


2,628 
32,209 


559 
158,240 


19,711 
44,791 


24,049 


219,496 


210,743 


70,659 


152,672 


10,199,683 


104,758 


359,883 


765,148 


53,495 


6,041 
328 


5,155 
9,729 
2,167 


3,351 
270 


5,625 
183 


2,244,500 
401,212 
250,815 


180 
176 


7,552 
1,651 


111,700 

20,103 

3,112 


1,845 


6,369 
103,281 


17,051 
108,192 


3,621 
32,436 


5,808 
52,891 


2,896,527 
2,249,991 


356 
32,209 


9,203 
158,240 


134,915 
44,791 


1,845 
24,049 


103,281 
28,000 

81,846 


108,192 
15,699 

69,801 


32,436 
3,500 

31,102 


52,891 
29,147 

64,826 


2,249,991 
959,575 

3,645,900 
447,690 


32,209 
25,359 

46,834 


158,240 
15,525 

176,915 


44,791 
40,800 

543,713 
929 


24,049 
5,448 

22,153 


109,846 


85,500 


34,602 


93,973 


5,053,165 


72,193 


192,440 


585,442 


27,601 


219,496 


210,743 


70,659 


152,672 


10,199,683 


104,758 


359,883 


765,148 


53,495 


50,806 
583 


66,582 
3,539 


17,162 
594 


57,176 
852 


4,265,143 
124,407 


15,806 
1,767 


109,157 
2,145 


163,656 
11,300 


12,447 
670 


51,389 


70,121 


17,756 


58,028 


4,389,550 


17,573 


111,302 


174,956 


13,117 


. 33,711 

3,904 

4,233 

440 

3,449 


45,444 

8,958 
7,516 
1,216 
5,847 


12,510 

1,618 
1,033 

1,535 


41,257 

4,064 
6,114 

2,826 


2,999,967 

239,024 
251,084 
256,435 
258,106 


9,192 

1,630 
3,857 

2,304 


69,698 

10,318 
12,966 

8,420 


78,642 
14,012 
16,547 
31,779 
12,844 
22,043 


8,446 

1,813 
1,020 

1,092 


45,737 


68,981 


16,696 


54,261 


4,004,616 


16,983 


101,402 


175,867 


12,371 


5,652 


1,140 


1,060 


3,767 


384,934 


590 


9,900 


911 


746 


394 


463 


109 


360 


20,185 


189 


983 


1,401 


91 



162 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financia 

















Municipality 

Population 


Cannington 
1,031 


Capreol 
3,151 


Cardinal 
1,907 


Carleton 
Place 
4,938 


Casselman 
1,271 


Cayuga 
1,039 


A. BALANCE SHEET 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


123,786 
40,008 


357,781 
70,659 


105,544 
32,651 


503.034 
119,340 


134,430 
33,355 


139,63" 
45,62! 


Less accumulated depreciation 


Net fixed assets 


83,778 

15,036 

8,500 
1,541 


287,122 
20,716 

793 
610 


72,893 

750 

1,500 
1,734 


383,694 

30,969 

15,000 
4,004 


101,075 

1,707 

18,000 

8,000 

1,066 


94,01' 

12,44 
10,00' 

6,00' 
1,18 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investments— short term 


—long term 


Accounts receivable (net) 


Other 






Total current assets 


25,077 
2,108 


22,119 
6,881 


3,984 
5,334 


49,973 

14,670 

248 


28,773 
9,534 


29,62 

53 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 






Total other assets 


2,108 
98,486 


6,881 
156,448 


5,334 
111,313 


14,918 
580,180 


9,534 
52,431 


53 




75,45 




Total 


209,449 


472,570 


193,524 


1,028,765 


191,813 


199,6. 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


4,819 
735 


49,800 

13,967 

7,125 


4,237 
837 


31,350 

19,317 

5,688 


19,000 

7,261 

67 




Current liabilities 


6,6: 




6! 






Total liabilities 


5,554 
98,486 


70,892 
156,448 


5,074 
111,313 


56,355 
580,180 


26,328 
52,431 


7,3: 


RESERVES 


75,4. 


Other reserves 






98,486 
14,532 

90,877 


156,448 
72,200 

170,414 
2,616 


111,313 
11,014 

66,123 


580,180 
76,947 

293,784 
21,499 


52,431 
51,000 

61,654 
400 


75,4 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


20,0 






Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


96,8 


Total capital 


105,409 


245,230 


77,137 


392,230 


113,054 


116,8 






Total 


209,449 


472,570 


193,524 


1,028,765 


191,813 


199,( 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 


47,135 
1,723 


164,053 
734 


57,215 
1,239 


278,495 
2,853 


58,095 
2,886 


54,: 


Miscellaneous 


V 




48,858 


164,787 


58,454 


281,348 


60,981 


57, 






EXPENSE 


38,597 

1,663 
4,617 

4,377 


102,906 

12,309 

20,109 

8,474 

9,370 


43,596 

4,760 
5,585 

3,166 


181,181 

34,734 

34,646 

5,764 

13,999 


43,327 

1,514 
7,489 
5,609 
3,605 


32, i 






Operation and maintenance 


5, ; 
7,1 


Financial 


4,7 


Other 




Total expense 


49,254 


153,168 


57,407 


270,324 


61,544 


49 .9 


Net income net expense 


396 


11,619 


1,047 


11,024 


563 


7 2 




__ 


Number of customers 


470 


1075 


686 


1,862 


416 









Statements A and B 



163 



■ 


Uilliiiiui: 


» »*»! HIV- 






■mvvm ^j., 










, 


;halk River 
1,043 


Chapleau 

Twp. 
3,658 


Chatham 
31,938 


Chatsworth 
383 


Chesley 
1,671 


Chesterville 
1,269 


Chippawa 
4,219 


Clifford 

532 


Clinton 
3,318 


90,945 
32,898 


246,731 
13,867 


4,540,474 
1,301,106 


38,574 
12,744 


175,407 
76,213 


119,665 
36,173 


339,870 
89,802 


67,405 
21,180 


460,877 
144,684 




58,047 
7,198 

251 


232,864 

48,857 

20,000 
4,066 
2,816 


3,239,368 

79,314 

375,000 

100,000 

251,009 

5,589 


25,830 

8,508 

13,874 
932 
400 


99,194 

11,070 

11,000 
7,463 


83,492 

16,907 

6,000 

6,250 

917 


250,068 

3,195 
10,000 

12,496 


46,225 

11,651 

10,000 

3,000 

88 


316,193 
42,539 

3,595 


7,449 
2,633 


75,739 
11,189 


810,912 

165,316 

38,274 


23,714 


29,533 
791 
985 


30,074 
5,438 


25,691 

1,993 

528 


24,739 


46,134 
6,294 


2,633 
33,665 


11,189 
46,634 


203,590 
2,937,693 


39,635 


1,776 
223,040 


5,438 
181,986 


2,521 
150,436 


59,861 


6,294 
329,195 


101,794 


366,426 


7,191,563 


89,179 


353,543 


300,990 


428,716 


130,825 


697,816 


29,500 
3,429 


53,000 
24,366 
11,207 


185,138 
198,125 


1,467 
295 


8,978 
1,026 


696 

433 


37,800 

12,236 

3,026 


3,002 
3,143 


21,000 

20,537 

5,231 




32,929 
33,665 


88,573 
46,634 


383,263 
2,937,693 


1,762 
39,635 


10,004 
223,040 


1,129 
181,986 


53,062 
150,436 


6,145 
59,861 


46,768 
329,195 


33,665 
25,500 

9,700 


46,634 
62,000 

161,040 
8,179 


2,937,693 
1,332,170 

2,538,437 


39,635 
5,014 

42,768 


223,040 
24,410 

96,089 


181,986 
5889 

111,986 


150,436 
40,550 

170,283 
14,385 


59,861 
11,927 

52,892 


329,195 
100,673 

221,180 


5,200 


231,219 


3,870,607 


47,782 


120,499 


117,875 


225,218 


64,819 


321,853 


- 101,794 


366,426 


7,191,563 


89,179 


353,543 


300,990 


428,716 


130,825 


697,816 




40,739 
374 


174,688 
4,326 


2,665,484 
60,460 


19,332 
1,244 


85,669 
2,527 


92,031 
1,452 


145,728 
1,113 


28,837 
1,579 


182,823 
7,934 




4!,iij 


179,014 


2,725,944 


20,576 


88,196 


93,483 


146,841 


30,4 16 


190,757 




24,749 

1,450 
2,548 
4,787 
2,940 


87,965 

25,933 

30,793 

10,554 

5,624 


1,587,987 

472,032 

257,923 

73,927 

109,660 


14,157 

3,139 
2,523 

1,414 


64,197 

9,025 
12,480 

4,880 


77,475 

2,131 
8,422 

4,096 


94,233 

26,832 

11,088 

6,613 

9,564 


20,545 

2,224 

1,965 

568 

2,434 


119,456 

17,597 

34,589 

4,552 

14,015 




36,474 


160,869 


2,501,529 


21,233 


90,582 


92,124 


148,330 


27,736 


190,209 




4,639 


18,145 


224,415 


657 


2,386 


1,359 


1,489 


2,680 


548 




281 


1,054 


10,894 


199 


800 


493 


1,292 


247 


1,325 



164 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 





Cobden 

850 


Cobourg 
10,662 


Cochrane 
4480 


Colborne 
1,499 


Coldwater 
759 






8,513 






A. BALANCE SHEET 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


97,639 
26,605 


1,477,242 
541,982 


629,638 
143,404 


195,337 
31,308 


78,240 
17,726 


1,289,156 j 
267,186 


Less accumulated depreciation 




71,034 

13,136 

6,000 
6,975 


935,260 

57,082 

25,000 

5,000 

21,842 


486,234 

8,242 
1,769 


164,029 
3,302 

8,941 
132 


60,514 

4,532 

22,500 
3,155 


1,021,970 

14,989 

9,624 
9,084 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investments-short term 


—long term 


Accounts receivable (net) 


Other 




26,111 
179 


108,924 

21,510 

1,508 


10,011 
23,670 
17,230 


12,375 
17,308 


30,187 


34,135 
24,560 . 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 






Total other assets 


179 
61,364 


23,018 
1,040,048 


40,900 
156,675 


17,308 
103,064 


84,214 


914/131 


Equity in Ontario Hydro 




Total 


158,688 


2,107,250 


693,820 


296,776 


174,915 


1,995,291 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 

Current liabilities 


10,832 
594 


69,147 
13,903 


35,000 
24,240 
22,091 


9,286 
2,047 


13,681 

432 


66,000 
181 '929 


Other liabilies 




Total liabilities 


11,426 
61,364 


83,050 
1,040,048 


81,331 
156,675 


11,333 
103,064 


14,113 
84,214 


321,581 
914,431 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro 


Other reserves 


Total reserves 


61,364 
4,949 

74,768 
6,181 


1,040,048 
105,993 

867,874 
10,285 


156,675 
110,000 

345,814 


103,064 
12,195 

169,584 
600 


84,214 
6,868 

69,720 


914,431 
42,183 

707,172 
9,924 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


Sinking fund debentures 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


Total capital 


85,898 


984,152 


455,814 


182,379 


76,588 


759,279 




Total 


158,688 


2,107,250 


693,820 


296,776 


174,915 


1,995,291 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


41,002 
752 


865,301 
30,967 


261,483 
11,045 


98,503 
2,954 


48,882 
1,061 


699,885 
12,459 


Miscellaneous 


Total revenue 


41,754 


896,268 


272,528 


101,457 


49,943 


712,344 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


29,702 

1,634 
3,998 

2,922 


685,242 

43,898 
59,830 

58,520 


156,552 

39,547 

47,064 

9,890 

17,706 


64,407 

7,179 
11,344 

4,353 


38,873 

4,507 
3,469 

2,266 


543.88C 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 




Total expense 


38,256 


847,490 


270,759 


87,283 


49,115 


689,30< 




Net income net expense . 


3,498 


48,778 


1,769 


14,174 


828 


23,041 




Number of customers 


402 


T <1S 


1,418 


651 


329 


3,48.' 

i 







Statements A and B 

statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



165 



Coniston 
2,732 



Cookstown 
715 



Cottam 
656 



Courtright 
666 



Creemore 
928 



Dashwood 
435 



Deep River 
5,637 



Delaware 

437 



173,369 
34,838 



69,653 
22,605 



72,128 
25,800 



54,820 
11,055 



98,887 
21,319 



45,077 
7,926 



804,993 
247,961 



41,397 
17,450 



138,531 
2,884 



553 
222 



47,048 

10,763 

6,007 
1,600 



46,328 

5,503 

11,000 
354 



43,765 
11,452 



736 
128 



77,568 

9,393 

5,000 
707 



37,151 
29,964 

570 



557,032 
16,822 



60,000 
9,387 



23,947 

7,522 
13,600 

109 



3,659 
1,488 

24,577 



18,370 



16,857 



629 



12,316 

25 



15,100 
171 



30,534 



6,687 



86,209 
10,939 

8,657 



21,231 



26,065 
49,217 



48,980 



629 
40,430 



25 
34,374 



171 

76,097 



6,687 
53,106 



19,596 
182,492 



32,303 



217,472 



114,398 



104,244 



90,480 



168,936 



127,478 



845,329 



77,481 



25,500 
9,802 
9,464 



4,059 
771 



3,156 



3,767 
643 



3,730 
660 



2,969 



146,656 

35,477 

1,323 



1,406 
184 



44,766 
49,217 



4,830 
48,980 



3,156 
40,430 



4,410 
34,374 



4,390 
76,097 



2,969 
53,106 



183,456 
182,492 



1,590 
32,303 



49,217 
24,500 



94,989 
4,000 



48,980 
12,001 

48,587 



40,430 
13,893 

46,765 



34,374 
8,138 



40,274 
3,284 



76,097 
2,824 

85,625 



53,106 



3,400 



68,003 



182,492 



84,344 



128,038 
266,999 



32,303 
4,000 



39,230 
358 



123,489 



60,588 



60,658 



51,696 



,449 



71,403 



479,381 



43,588 



217,472 



114,398 



104,244 



90,480 



168,936 



127,478 



845,329 



77,481 



,142 
449 



30,455 
647 



25,490 
1,376 



25,561 
187 



39,507 
1,383 



32,505 



306,632 
12,605 



20,977 
1,709 



88,591 



31,102 



26,866 



25,748 



40,890 



33,403 



319,237 



22,686 



63,783 

4,050 
9,616 
3,798 
4,389 



24,357 

2,246 
1,428 

2,301 



15,797 

2,756 
4,241 

2,700 



13,661 



1,832 
3,492 



1,570 



29,178 



2,826 
3,264 



3,272 



20,306 



1,216 
2,475 



1,234 



211,210 

20,432 
28,115 
18,681 
23,939 



13,799 

2,239 
1,804 

1,798 



85,636 



30,332 



25,494 



20,555 



38,540 



25,231 



302,377 



19,640 



2,955 



724 



770 



283 



,372 



264 



5,193 



234 



2,350 



376 



8,172 



194 



16,860 



1,510 



3,046 



154 



166 


Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical 


Utilities Financial 


Municipality 


Delhi 
3,696 


Deseronto 
1,800 


Dorchester 
1,145 


Drayton 
686 


Dresden 
2,417 




Population 


447 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


537,321 
156,549 


180,029 
77,576 


96,472 
30,883 


105,301 
16,454 


350,065 
79,806 


40,257 


Less accumulated depreciation 


20,330 


Net fixed assets 


380,772 

16,249 
70,000 

9,373 


102,453 

16,276 

4,000 
6,503 


65,589 

6,515 

1,500 

1,134 

250 


88,847 

7,440 

2,500 

8,500 

199 


270,250 

19,187 

1,000 
3,385 


19,927 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investments-short term 


6,272 


-long term 

Accounts receivable (net) 

Other 


5,500 

764 


Total current assets 


95,622 
14,531 


26,779 
10,599 


9,399 

367 


18,639 
246 


23,572 
5,898 


12,536 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 










14,531 

242,471 


10,599 
122,936 


367 

57,804 


246 
73,021 


5,898 
226,811 






42,723 






Total 


733,396 


262,767 


133,159 


180,753 


526,531 


75,186 


LIABILITIES 


15,455 
5,239 


7,033 
1,406 


1,042 

2,938 

428 


2,877 
758 


2,572 

12,253 

2,426 




Current liabilities 


1,439 1 




151 






Total liabilities 


20,694 

242,471 


8,439 
122,936 


4,408 
57,804 


3,635 
73,021 


17,251 
226,811 


1,590 ] 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro 


42,723 I 










Total reserves 


242,471 
85,000 

346,890 
38,341 


122,936 
15,000 

116,392 


57,804 
6,258 

64,689 


73,021 
9,500 

94,447 
150 


226,811 
48,651 

233,718 
100 


42,723 | 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


4,50C 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


26,32( 

5: 






Total capital 


470,231 


131,392 


70,947 


104,097 


282,469 


30,87: 


Total 


733,396 


262,767 


133,159 


180,753 


526,531 


75,184 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 
REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


195,535 
8,527 


87,701 
5.009 


40,174 
1,654 


40,615 
998 


192,874 
3,094 


17,16 
1,00 


Miscellaneous 


Total revenue 


204,062 


92,710 


41.828 


41,613 


195,968 


18,16 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


138,779 

18,922 
21,950 

15,898 


64,772 

9,284 
9,968 

7,285 


27,923 

4,761 

2,859 

243 

3,698 


23,817 

1,994 
2,650 

3,117 


128,514 

12,190 

26,468 

1,390 

7,761 


13,56 

1,39 
1,87 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 


Total expense 


195,549 


91,309 


39,484 


31,578 


176,323 


17,82 




Net income net expense 


8,513 


1,401 


2,344 


10,035 


19,645 


3- 




Number of customers 


1,601 


626 


382 


285 


980 


l* 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



167 



Dry den 

6,727 


Dublin 
309 


Dundalk 
871 


Dundas 
15,868 


Dunnville 

5,279 


Durham 
2,166 


Dutton 

733 


East York 
97,069 


Eganville 
1,366 


959,948 
333,261 


63,993 
17,056 


100,209 
18,478 


2,595,491 
530,876 


727,727 
179,569 


283,864 
72,383 


84,368 
23,735 


6,725,738 
1,727,201 


223,567 
76,560 


626,687 

8,960 
37,000 

1,172 
2,149 


46,937 

1,116 

1,000 
466 


81,731 

5,225 

26,500 
2,823 


2,064,615 

1,836 

9,000 

75,023 

4,995 


548,158 

11,826 
35,800 

6,877 
1,020 


211,481 

54,353 

4,000 
10,362 


60,633 
799 

444 


4,998,537 

127,728 

1,750,000 

200,000 

297,877 

438 


147,007 

12,945 

14,635 
1,123 


49,281 
6,329 
4,338 


2,582 


34,548 
130 


90,854 
28,466 
19,115 


55,523 
33,064 


68,715 
1,173 
5,027 


1,243 
13 


2,376,043 
79,115 
97,782 


28,703 
1,366 


10,667 
237,088 


36,768 


130 
95,387 


47,581 
1,041,394 


33,064 
537,766 


6,200 
220,169 


13 
94,803 


176,897 
4,203,903 


1,366 
38,664 


923,723 


86,287 


211,796 


3,244,444 


1,174,511 


506,565 


156,692 


11,755,380 


215,740 


80,000 

2,325 

20,919 


4,397 
77 


4,548 

545 


740,700 

168,222 

53,921 


23,870 

22,467 

8,527 


24,000 

10,796 

1,256 


2,765 
446 


1,919,903 
296,097 


4,405 
621 


1 103,244 
237,088 


4,474 
36,768 


5,093 

95,387 


962,843 
1,041,394 


54,864 
537,766 


36,052 
220,169 


3,211 
94,803 


2,216,000 
4,203,903 


5,026 
38,664 


I 237,088 
, 121,430 

: 461,961 


36,768 
6,200 

37,291 
1,554 


95,387 

5,727 

105,589 


1,041,394 
335,864 

751,363 
152,980 


537,766 
116,069 

439,450 
26,362 


220,169 
31,324 

219,020 


94,803 
8,407 

50,271 


4,203,903 
1,193,301 

3,955,234 
186,942 


38,664 
98,007 

74,043 


583,391 


45,045 


111,316 


1,240,207 


581,881 


250,344 


58,678 


5,335,477 


172,050 


923,723 


86,287 


211,796 


3,244,444 


1,174,511 


506,565 


156,692 


11,755,380 


215,740 


: 

389,931 
| 16,298 


24,471 
230 


61,698 
1,244 


874,277 
33,528 


326,034 
6,420 


138,140 
7,105 


32,254 
303 


2,914,027 
198,029 


' 72,105 
1,338 


406,229 


24,701 


62,942 


907,805 


332,454 


145,245 


32,557 


3,112,056 


73,443 


236,906 

54,400 
46,102 
1 1 ,040 
32,801 


16,752 

2,085 
2,694 

1,953 


41,040 

6,169 

5,726 

2,529 


559,865 

82,417 
79,386 
89,523 
72,780 


208,783 

37,961 

22,109 

5,384 

18,039 


97,429 

11,467 

16,806 

2,480 

8,664 


17,651 

7,238 
3,420 

2,653 


2,046,239 

386,587 

375,399 

91,264 

231,725 


38,124 
9,536 
3,581 
7,662 

5,807 


381,249 


23,484 


55,464 


883,971 


292,276 


136,846 


30,962 


3,131,214 


64,710 


24.980 


1,217 


7,478 


23,834 


40,178 


8,399 


1,595 


19,158 


8,733 


2,187 


127 


534 


5,121 


2,084 


951 


363 


25,039 


522 



168 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financia 



Municipality 


Elmira 

4,333 


Elm vale 
1,062 


Elmwood 
450 


Elora 
1,684 


Embro 
660 


Embrun 


Population 


1,274 






A. BALANCE SHEET 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


605,379 
181,868 


112,786 
35,507 


28,006 
12,104 


206,092 
70,982 


94,686 
34,539 


144,406 


Less accumulated depreciation 


36,44( 




423,511 

11,059 

125,000 

10,688 

1,695 


77,279 
13,653 

11,869 

2,527 


15,962 

4,525 

9,000 
188 


135,110 

4,213 

10,000 

5,269 

2,348 

144 


60,147 

281 

6,000 
732 
619 


107,966 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investments— short term 


3,20: 


-long term 

Accounts receivable (net) 

Other 


1,13! 




148,442 
650 


28,049 

57 

1,181 


13,713 


21,974 
751 


7,632 


4,33? 
5,75( 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 






650 
563,926 


1,238 
92,096 


32,786 


751 
181,126 


64,787 


5,75( 

34,29< 






Total 


1,136,529 


198,662 


62,461 


338,961 


132,566 


152,34! 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 

Current liabilities 


29,725 
3,746 


5,052 
770 


898 
63 


1,200 
6,609 
1,803 


5,020 
1,197 


93,50( 
7,60: 


Other liabilities 






Total liabilities 


33,741 
563,926 


5,822 
92,096 


961 

32,786 


9,612 
181,126 


6,217 
64,787 


101,10: 

34,29< 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro 


Other reserves 






Total reserves 


563,926 
37,169 

500,328 
1,635 


92,096 
6,544 

94,200 


32,786 
6,106 

22,608 


181,126 
18,662 

128,112 
1,449 


64,787 
7,500 

54,062 


34,29- 
8,50' 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


Sinking fund debentures 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


8,45 


Total capital 

Total 


539,132 
1,136,529 


100,744 
198,662 


28,714 
62,461 


148,223 
338,961 


61,562 
132,566 


16,95 
152,34 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


350,497 
11,974 


60,431 
1,774 


12,623 
478 


82,240 
2,480 


33,565 
1,919 


71,84 
1,45 


Miscellaneous 




Total revenue 


362,471 


62,205 


13,101 


84,720 


35,484 


73,29 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


275,325 

14,968 

23,024 

17,541 


43,394 

2,185 
6,214 

3,789 


8,919 

248 
1,564 

982 


53,237 

13,692 

12,927 

674 

6,388 


24,591 

4,269 
4,416 

3,637 


49,67 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


1,53 
3,58 
8,84 
4,43 


Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 


Total expense 


330,885 


55,582 


11,713 


86,918 


36,913 


68,07 


Net income net expense " . 


31,586 


6,623 


1,388 


2,198 


1,429 


5,21 




Number of customers 


1 488 


4^7 1« 


5Q7 


771 


17 







Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 






169 


Erieau 
456 


Erie Beach 
212 


Erin 
1,259 


Espanola 
5,639 


Essex 
3,785 


Etobicoke 
266,117 


Exeter 
3,170 


Fenelon 
Falls 
1,457 


Fergus 
5,008 


! 103,411 
35,183 


26,261 
7,217 


123,358 
26,039 


471,106 
114,043 


441,983 
148,875 


36,265,051 
7,388,099 


611,640 
142,216 


330,251 
92,636 


634,030 
173,150 


; 68,228 

14,112 

3,923 
679 
130 


19,044 
8,898 

159 


97,319 

5,646 

5,000 
563 


357,063 

18,007 

20,000 

9,000 

6,163 

1,060 


293,108 
34,753 

5,168 


28,876,952 

776,000 

155,000 

871,060 

16,399 


469,424 

2,591 

9,084 

4,812 

101 


237,615 

15,277 

5,420 
174 


460,880 

11,871 

15,000 

6,362 

184 


> 18,844 

5 


9,057 


11,209 
329 
844 


54,230 

624 

10,794 


39,921 

20,788 

919 


1,818,459 

859,864 

2,744,683 

174,998 


16,588 

813 

1,217 


20,871 
5,805 


33,417 
779 


30 
66,856 


11,787 


1,173 
48,626 


11,418 
91,382 


21,707 
258,206 


3,779,545 
15,430,012 


2,030 
333,265 


5,805 
2,015 


779 
546,216 


' 153,958 


39,888 


158,327 


514,093 


612,942 


49,904,968 


821,307 


266,306 


1,041,292 


1,984 
263 


405 
188 


4,609 
1,074 


108,000 

33,634 

5,873 


6,300 
21,044 


9,133,220 

2,368,533 

327,658 


40,603 

15,438 

3,271 


66,000 

16,185 

3,240 


10,500 

37,292 

4,218 


1 2,247 
J 66,856 


593 
11,787 


5,683 
48,626 


147,507 
91,382 


27,344 
258,206 


11,829,411 
15,430,012 


59,312 

333,265 


85,425 
2,015 


52,010 
546,216 


66,856 
S 20,529 

> 64,326 


11,787 
7,783 

19,725 


48,626 
14,242 

89,776 


91,382 
37,000 

154,498 
83,706 


258,206 
44,809 

279,221 
3,362 


15,430,012 

3,352,569 
2,744,683 

14,388,400 
2,159,893 


333,265 
24,396 

362,212 
42,122 


2,015 

94,000 

75,725 
9,141 


546,216 
64,461 

371,308 
7,297 


1 84,855 
M53,958 


27,508 
39,888 


104,018 
158,327 


275,204 
514,093 


327,392 
612,942 


22,645,545 
49,904,968 


428,730 
821,307 


178,866 
266,306 


443,066 
1,041,292 


36,466 
899 


9,873 
124 


66,412 
3,415 


235,824 
9,118 


194,788 
4,731 


18,357,113 
309,944 


230,012 
3,667 


112,656 
793 


423,418 
8,098 


1 37,365 


9,997 


69,827 


244,942 


199,519 


18,667,057 


233,679 


113,449 


431,516 


, 22,415 

4,159 
| 5,003 

3,397 


4,474 

1,097 
1,436 

846 


44,800 

5,516 
5,096 

4,577 


163,177 

23,486 

23,242 
13,217 
13,012 


121,970 

21,563 

26,762 

1,552 

12,736 


13,291,150 

1,093,071 
992,993 

1,023,018 
968,909 


140,754 

19,146 

27,089 

3,827 

16,499 


53,266 
23,508 
12,620 

8,425 
10,075 

7,831 


332,503 

28,085 

31,592 

2,002 

19,323 


' 34,974 


7,853 


59,989 


236,134 


184,583 


17,369,141 


207,315 


115,725 


413,505 


2,391 


2,144 


9,838 


8,808 


14,936 


1,297,916 


26,364 


2,276 


18,011 


' 385 


149 


498 


1,582 


1,282 


84,974 


1,414 


884 


1,735 



170 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Municipality 

Population 


Finch 
379 


Flesherton 
510 


Fonthill 
2,937 


Forest 

2,237 


Fort 

William 
48,615 


Frank ford 
1,861 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


65,007 
20,804 


52,584 
16,420 


248,864 
81,838 


254,192 
127,660 


6,010,488 
2,278,038 


161 163 


Less accumulated depreciation 


47,967 


Net fixed assets 


44,203 

8,662 

6,000 
2,299 


36,164 

2,758 

8,000 
709 


167,026 

16,017 
13,500 

1,513 


126,532 

14,028 

38,434 
1,840 


3,732,450 

180,973 

400,000 

50,000 

210,211 


113,196 
12,666 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investments-short term 






Accounts receivable (net) 


1,889 


Other 


487 




16,961 


11,467 


31,030 
82 


54,302 
6,053 


841,184 

151,945 

11,059 


15,042 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 




Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 


806 






Total other assets 


41,605 


48,438 


82 
125,155 


6,053 
251,704 


163,004 
7,320,352 


806 




60,53c 






Total 


102,769 


96,069 


323,293 


438,591 


12,056,990 


189,58: 






LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


11,193 

344 


6,475 
2,352 


2,500 

12,350 

2,501 


9,290 
1,430 


246,000 
193,942 
170,429 


11,50( 


Current liabilities 


9,07! 


Other liabilities 


1,65( 






Total liabilities 


11,537 
41,605 


8,827 
48,438 


17,351 
125,155 


10,720 
251,704 


610,371 
7,320,352 


22,22? 


RESERVES 


60,53) 


Other reserves 








Total reserves 


41,605 
7,000 

41,755 
872 


48,438 
5,831 

32,973 


125,155 
57,673 

121,064 
2,050 


251,704 
23,357 

143,824 
8,986 


7,320,352 
816,139 

3,272,750 
37,378 


60,53: 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


21,50' 






Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


85,31, 








49,627 


38,804 


180,787 


176,167 


4,126,267 


106,81 






Total 


102,769 


96,069 


323,293 


438,591 


12,056,990 


189,58 






B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


20,930 
311 


29,148 
896 


108,782 
5,521 


124,853 
8,816 


2,359,642 
166,271 


69,32 




4,68 








21,241 


30,044 


1 14,303 


133,669 


2,525,913 


74,01 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


13,805 

1,645 
2,240 

1,746 


24,936 

1,347 
2,235 

1,752" 


79,461 

8,923 

11,534 

641 

9,772 


92,414 

13,304 
14,544 

10,585 


1,772,638 

233,355 

253,391 

53,495 

221,242 


55,5( 






Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation 


5,2c 

8,1' 
1,2* 
7,3' 


Other 








Total expense 


19,436 


30,270 


110,331 


130,847 


2,534,121 


77,61 


Net income net expense 


1,805 


226 


3,972 


2,822 


8,208 


3,5 






Number of customers 


173 


250 


994 


943 


15.708 


6: 







Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



171 



Gait 
34,996 


Georgetown 
14,523 


Glencoe 
1,230 


Gloucester 
Twp. 
23,066 


Goderich 
6,660 


Grand 
Bend 
643 


Grand 

Valley 

848 


Gran ton 

327 


Gravenhurst 
3,264 


4,957,119 
1,727,874 


1,661,143 

423,695 


198,534 
63,927 


3,516,486 
803,724 


1,162,905 

358,535 


222,466 
71,312 


74,545 
25,672 


27,272 
5,854 


390,311 
101,338 


3,229,245 

450 

50,000 
82,148 


1,237,448 

200 

14,000 

13,088 

813 


134,607 
6,626 

9,766 
145 


2,712,762 

2,422 
150,000 

139,049 
10,108 


804,370 

30,778 
35,000 
55,876 
13,215 
960 


151,154 
31,688 

934 


48,873 

19,183 

13,000 
2,009 
2,400 


21,418 
10,599 

792 

365 


288,973 
10,562 

7,000 
7,204 


132,598 

135,517 

62,475 


28,101 

56,424 

3,472 


16,537 
1,238 


301,579 
116,001 
106,815 


135,829 
6,934 


32,622 

582 

7,684 


36,592 
1,431 


11,756 

108 

1,026 


24,766 

7,569 

503 


197,992 
3,680,562 


59,896 
923,299 


1,238 
118,503 


222,816 
623,353 


6,934 
858,166 


8,266 
88,105 


1,431 
83,041 


1,134 
31,645 


8,072 
347,640 


7,240,397 


2,248,744 


270,885 


3,860,510 


1,805,299 


280,147 


169,937 


65,953 


669,451 


188,176 
83,519 


303,552 

213,896 

24,364 


36,771 
598 


2,515,587 

180,294 

11,422 


25,500 
55,950 


34,619 

7,017 

600 


3,107 


842 


74,863 
3,772 


' 271,695 
'3,680,562 


541,812 
923,299 


37,369 
118,503 


2,707,303 
623,353 


81,450 
858,166 


42,236 
88,105 


3,107 
83,041 


842 
31,645 


78,635 
347,640 


3,680,562 
'■ 817,298 

2,306,640 
164,202 


923,299 
215,059 

568,574 


118,503 
20,113 

88,301 
6,599 


623,353 
192,875 

99,209 

237,770 


858,166 
187,460 

678,223 


88,105 
56,381 

87,009 
6,416 


83,041 
10,794 

72,995 


31,645 
6,602 

26,864 


347,640 
44,279 

194,218 
4,679 


3,288,140 


783,633 


115,013 


529,854 


865,683 


149,806 


83,789 


33,466 


243,176 


7,240,397 

i 


2,248,744 


270,885 


3,860,510 


1,805,299 


280,147 


169,937 


65,953 


669,451 


'2,369,370 
13,721 


785,329 
30,224 


71,672 
1,221 


1,569,362 
69,219 


483,864 
13,523 


94,029 
1,314 


38,683 
997 


13,555 

274 


181,982 
4,689 


2,383,091 


815,553 


72,893 


1,638,581 


497,387 


95,343 


39,680 


13,829 


186,671 


.1,722,844 

; 186,286 
i 160,627 

i 141,198 


642,495 

44,691 
63,546 
38,383 
56,818 


43,379 

11,500 
10,880 

6,123 


1,043,911 

70,143 
131,182 
227,637 
111,753 


353,574 

23,394 

66,540 

9,180 

35,545 


45,312 

11,517 

15,884 

6,821 

6,562 


28,959 

3,129 
2,855 

2,437 


7,722 

1,775 
2,022 

798 


137,060 

18,275 
18,649 

11,776 


2,210,955 


845,933 


71,882 


1,584,626 


488,233 


86,096 


37,380 


12,317 


185,760 


172,136 


30,380 


1,011 


53,955 


9,154 


9,247 


2,300 


1,512 


911 


10,785 


4,486 


605 | 


6,327 


2,668 


881 


368 


125 | 


1,487 



172 


Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal 


Electrical 


Utilities Financial 


Municipality 

Population 


Grimsby 

6,773 


Guelph 
53,329 


Hagersville 

2,222 


Hamilton 
291,187 


Hanover 
4,833 


Harriston 
1,640 


A. BALANCE SHEET 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


571,071 
157,742 


8,035,246 
1,548,571 


239,389 
79,028 


34,924,520 
5,606,048 


603,125 
203,425 


298 931 


Less accumulated depreciation 


78,881 


Net fixed assets 


413,329 

80,760 
100,000 

4,833 
260 


6,486,675 
71,385 

133,032 


160,361 

2,383 

57,000 

2,472 

10,000 


29,318,472 

376,175 
1,205,000 

2,159,776 
17,072 


399,700 

11,141 

22,000 

15,163 

495 


220 050 


CURRENT ASSETS 


12,755 


Investments-short term 


—long term 


7,000 
991 




Other 


134 








185,853 
3,412 


204,417 

115,377 

9,878 


71,855 
65 


3,758,023 
919,894 
141,671 


48,799 

15,160 

100 


20,880 
352 


OTHER ASSETS 


Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 


357 








3,412 
287,566 


125,255 
4,787,728 


65 
366,943 


1,061,565 
49,402,463 


15,260 
571,294 


709 




218 894 






Total 


890,160 


11,604,075 


599,224 


83,540,523 


1,035,053 


460,533 




LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


54,000 

31,250 

9,479 


1,203,000 
181,917 
102,195 


11,034 
1,665 


507,000 

2,807,093 

251,164 


25,891 
4,247 


30,000 
8,418 
1,931 


Current liabilities 


Other liabilities 




Total liabilities 


94,729 
287,566 


1,487,112 
4,787,728 


12,699 
366,943 


3,565,257 

49,402,463 
217,406 


30,138 
571,294 


40,349 
218,894 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro 


Other reserves 






Total reserves 


287,566 
121,344 

385,063 
1,458 


4,787,728 
1,058,212 

3,932,650 
338,373 


366,943 
8,000 

210,220 

1,362 


49,619,869 

7,202,892 

22,723,517 
428,988 


571,294 
80,162 

340,653 
12,806 


218,894 
35,708 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


Sinking fund debentures 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


165,582 






Total capital 


507,865 


5,329,235 


219,582 


30,355,397 


433,621 


201,290 




Total 


890,160 


11,604,075 


599,224 


83,540,523 


1,035,053 


460,533 




B. OPERATING STATEMENT 
REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


329,969 
11,243 


4,339,610 

74,823 


150,394 
4,838 


30,066,136 
424,718 


331,770 
3,056 


119,81 

2,27^ 


Miscellaneous 




Total revenue 


341,212 


4,414,433 


155,232 


30,490,854 


334,826 


122,085 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


214,978 

19,280 

33,353 

9,728 

19,481 


3,014,420 

263,964 
368,908 
166,686 
232,382 


110,219 

22,824 
13,459 

7,930 


25,950,365 

1,366,566 

1,492,925 

113,818 

848,984 


266,529 

20,871 
23,538 

16,684 


78,918 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


12,061 
9,69' 
2,84f 

8,32^ 


Financial 


Depreciation 


Other 


Total expense 


296,820 


4,046,360 


154,432 


29,772,658 


327,622 


lll,84f 




Net income net expense 


44,392 


368,073 


800 


718,196 


7,204 


10,24( 


Number of customers .... 


2 324 


IS Qfi? 


8£7 


Q4 1HQ 


1 Qnn 


72( 







Statements A and B 

Itatements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



173 



Harrow 
, 1,878 


Hastings 
838 


Havelock 
1,214 


Hawkesbury 
9,049 


Hearst 
3,280 


Hensall 
916 


Hespeler 
5,942 


Highgate 
390 


Holstoin 
172 


299,047 
94,863 


131,159 
42,117 


138,863 
48,080 


960,720 
263,627 


347,604 
78,988 


187,921 
60,978 


725,581 
185,499 


49,371 
20,659 


14,050 
4,578 


204,184 
19,621 

195 
220 


89,042 
2,534 

1,483 


90,783 

10,585 

50,119 
2,420 


697,093 
20,670 

6,188 


268,616 

6,730 

40,000 
10,126 


126,943 

8,058 

8,926 
6,588 


540,082 

17,797 
20,000 

41,205 
879 


28,712 

4,131 

3,000 
383 


9,472 
5,848 

242 
47 


20,036 

: 

3,188 


4,017 
271 


63,124 
3,176 


26,858 

24,792 

1,133 


56,856 
740 


23,572 
30 


79,881 

453 

3,344 


7,514 


6,137 


3,188 
227,074 


271 
58,328 


3,176 
92,100 


25,925 
220,445 


740 
135,998 


30 
123,337 


3,797 
892,965 


44,912 


17,658 


454,482 


151,658 


249,183 


970,321 


462,210 


273,882 


1,516,725 


81,138 


33,267 


10,695 
1,198 


4,544 
535 


4,500 

3,795 

511 


92,000 

35,199 

7,688 


43,561 
4,604 


6,083 
463 


34,030 
6,885 


1,716 
274 


662 
76 


11,893 

227,074 


5,079 
58,328 


8,806 
92,100 


134,887 
220,445 


48,165 
135,998 


6,546 

123,337 


40,915 
892,965 


1,990 

44,912 


738 
17,658 


227,074 
12,000 

203,515 


58,328 
21,000 

66,294 
957 


92,100 
58,400 

89,877 


220.445 
193,000 

395,307 
26,682 


135,998 

72,177 

205,770 
100 


123,337 
12,000 

123,720 
8,279 


892,965 

77,571 

502,610 
2,664 


44,912 
5,000 

29,236 


17,658 

2,762 

12,109 


215,515 


88,251 


148,277 


614,989 


278,047 


143,999 


582,845 


34,236 


14,871 


I 454,482 


151,658 


249,183 


970,321 


462,210 


273,882 


1,516,725 


81,138 


33,267 


■ ■ 

138,476 
7,297 

145,773 


49,175 
1,480 


51,535 
3,436 


418,072 
12,790 


209,408 
4,968 


71,686 
663 


420,483 
14,479 


16,826 

335 


8,180 


50,655 


54,971 


430,862 


214,376 


72,349 


434,962 


17,161 


8,180 


98,018 

9,569 
24,617 

9,702 

— — 


32,771 

2,180 
6,076 

4,744 


31,602 

3,675 
5,560 
1,710 
4,582 


291,449 

26,401 
44,847 
20,907 
31,556 


149,747 

13,206 

19,327 

1,373 

11,127 


51,007 

8,006 
8,839 

5,768 


338,255 

24,630 
31,908 

21,651 


12,117 

1,426 
2,221 

1,812 


6,025 

419 
614 

456 


141,906 


45,771 


47,129 


415,160 


194,780 


73,620 


416,444 


17,576 


7,514 


3,867 


4,884 


7,842 


15,702 


19,596 


1,271 


18,518 


415 


666 


758 


421 


478 


2,521 


899 


387 


1,817 


111 


99 



174 



Municipal Electrical Service 







m 


Lumcipal J 


electrical 


Utilities 


financial 


Municipality 

Population 


Huntsville 

3,275 


Ingersoll 
7,401 


Iroquois 
1,137 


Jarvis 
861 


Kapuskasing 
12,472 


Kemptville 
2,171 


A. BALANCE SHEET 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


433,821 
102,596 


1,037,842 
309,295 


190,231 
60,454 


95,389 
26,346 


750,943 
146,905 


346,998 


Less accumulated depreciation 


57,480 




331,225 

18,161 

55,000 

10,397 

870 


728,547 

150 
75,000 

13,135 
599 


129,777 

6,173 

43,000 
7,506 
2,052 


69,043 
20,568 

2,109 
53 


604,038 

21,245 
10,000 

6,370 
535 


289,518 
1,654 j 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 




1,000 


Accounts receivable (net) 


18,279 


Other 


683 




84,428 
7,768 
8,886 


88,884 

54,219 

3,245 


58,731 

206 

5,117 


22,730 


38,150 

12,375 

6,280 


21,616 
13,309 , 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 






16,654 
444,030 


57,464 
1,028,417 


5,323 
83,884 


83,994 


18,655 
229,162 


13,309 


Equity in Ontario Hydro 


221,524 






Total 


876,337 


1,903,312 


277,715 


175,767 


890,005 


545,967 J 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


24,853 
1,694 


31,621 

40,240 

6,285 


8,764 
1,661 


2,960 
220 


157,300 
40,787 
11,339 


79,108 
1,693 


Other liabilities 




Total liabilities 


26,547 
444,030 


78,146 
1,028,417 


10,425 
83,884 


3,180 
83,994 


209,426 
229,162 


80,801 


RESERVES 


221,524 


Other reserves 








444,030 
15,697 

390,063 


1,028,417 
168,179 

627,115 
1,455 


83,884 

65,171 
118,235 


83,994 
10,500 

72,331 
5,762 


229,162 
128,179 

323,238 


221,524 
19,50' 

224,13.' 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


Sinking fund debentures 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


Total capital 


405,760 


796,749 


183,406 


88,593 


451,417 


243,64: 


Total 


876,337 


1,903,312 


277,715 


175,767 


890,005 


545,96 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


197,965 
9,560 


439,931 
19,679 


67,476 
3,530 


32,396 
1,266 


336,729 
8,015 


175,11 
6,71 


Miscellaneous 


Total revenue 


207,525 


459,610 


71,006 


33,662 


344,744 


181,83 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


145,856 

22,822 
16,579 

12,162 


324,946 

37,645 
51,575 
11,582 
28,631 


53,002 

7,172 
8,184 

5,207 


19,106 

6,941 

5,174 

3,051 


225,696 

24,861 
59,032 
19,629 
22,903 


120,24 

11,61 
24,60 

10,08 


Local generation 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation 


Other 


Total expense 


197,419 


454,379 


73,565 


34,272 


352,121 


166^5 


Net income net expense 


10,106 


5,231 


2,559 


610 


7,377 


15,26 




Number of customers 


1,342 


2,516 


442 


314 


2,287 


9: 





Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



175 



Kenora 
13,002 


Killaloe 

Station 

853 


Kincardine 
2,744 


King City 
1,960 


Kingston 
56,159 


Kingsville 
3,583 


Kirkfield 
199 


Kitchener 
99,021 


Lakefield 
2,162 


1,629,230 
352,449 


65,559 
23,302 


365,537 
128,826 


174,178 
76,325 


8,595,912 
2,697,492 


439,162 
152,757 


32,141 
9,403 


16,830,986 
4,073,431 


333,841 
105,834 


1,276,781 

360 

85,000 

59,642 
480 


42,257 
25,685 

1,834 


236,711 

37,433 

25,000 
9,383 


97,853 

6,967 
25,000 
25,000 

3,649 


5,898,420 

356,209 
675,000 

608,764 

243 


286 405 

50 

8,500 

8,582 

140 


22,738 

2,059 

6,000 
735 


12,757,555 

462,654 
450,000 

994,157 
4,043 


228,007 

36,532 

21,000 
4,416 


145,482 


27,519 
2,455 


71,816 
12,761 
13,917 


60,616 

144 

5,094 


1,640,216 

239,176 

5,909 


17,272 

1,684 

305 


8,794 


1,910,854 

477,366 

30,142 


61,948 

6,425 

154 


26,434 


2,455 
22,859 


26,678 
365,487 


5,238 
54,015 


245,085 
4,265,606 


1,989 
302,483 


18,039 


507,508 
9,542,338 


6,579 
176,753 


1,448,697 


95,090 


700,692 


217,722 


12,049,327 


608,149 


49,571 


24,718,255 


473,287 


487,000 
j 79,237 
> 16,030 


29,500 

2,258 

162 


12,780 
2,913 


91,800 

13,910 

1,866 


1,981,000 

322,646 

16,769 


36,684 
5,450 


1,005 
13 


1,894,000 
679,769 
119,041 


11,337 
1,782 


582,267 
26,434 


31,920 
22,859 


15,693 
365,487 


107,576 
54,015 


2,320,415 
4,265,606 


42,134 
302,483 


1,018 
18,039 


2,692,810 
9,542,338 


13,119 
176,753 


26,434 
128,652 

711,344 


22,859 
10,500 

29,811 


365,487 
60,000 

259,512 


54,015 
19,159 

36,459 
513 


4,265,606 
1,089,185 

4,333,475 
40,646 


302,483 
33,500 

209,667 
20,365 


18,039 

5,766 

24,748 


9,542,338 
2,633,244 

9,158,843 
691,020 


176,753 
33,500 

249,915 


839,996 


40,311 


319,512 


56,131 


5,463,306 


263,532 


30,514 


12,483,107 


283,415 


,448,697 




95,090 


700,692 


217,722 


12,049,327 


608,149 


49,571 


24,718,255 


473,287 




635,440 
29,050 


33,908 
690 


181,762 
4,967 


94,725 
10,413 


3,464,031 
119,710 


187,424 
933 


9,846 
530 


6,997,114 
41,630 


144,654 
4,396 


664,490 


34,598 


186,729 


105,138 


3,583,741 


188,357 


10,376 


7,038,744 


149,050 


,403,161 

85,885 

58,218 

45,546 

\ 49,941 


17,717 

739 
3,777 
3,360 
2,033 


117,362 

16,144 
13,881 

12,895 


71,738 

4,073 
8,221 
9,682 
8,691 


2,405,791 

336,317 
317,934 
191,177 
247,317 


137,522 

16,971 
25,202 

12,834 


5,936 

528 
786 

1,117 


4,958,248 

454,739 
467,529 
227,845 
400,449 


90,807 

10,103 
9,765 

12,095 


642,751 
21,739 


27,626 


160, 282 


102,405 


3,498,536 


192,529 


8,367 


6,508,810 


122,770 


6,972 


26,447 


2,733 


85,205 


4,172 


2,009 


529,934 


26,280 


4,545 


296 


1,374 


564 


19,367 


1,530 


117 


31,122 


848 



176 


Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal 


Electrical 


Utilities Financia 


Municipality 


Lambeth 
2,819 


Lanark 
906 


Lancaster 
565 


Larder Lake 
Twp. 
1,351 


Latch ford 

477 


Leamington 
9,567 


Population 


A. BALANCE SHEET 

FIXED ASSETS 


216,267 
67,040 


77,916 
20,280 


52,853 
17,569 


81,687 
36,981 


57,119 
15,651 


1,270,887 


Less accumulated depreciation 


335,219 


Net fixed assets 


149,227 

33,631 
10,000 

3,612 
250 


57,636 

4,893 

4,000 
1,004 


35,284 

17,492 

11,727 
1,558 
1,130 


44,706 

15,554 
22,000 

723 


41,468 
4,784 

379 
55 


935,668 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


28,523 
10,000 




2.000 


Accounts receivable (net) 


21,611 


Other 






47,493 
250 


9,897 

253 


31,907 
4,550 


38,277 


5,218 


62,134 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 


33,887 
3c 








250 
111,559 


253 
52,972 


4,550 
41,629 


67,035 


11,613 


33,92f 




878,106 






Total 


308,529 


120,758 


113,370 


150,018 


58,299 


1,909,83.' 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 

Current liabilities 


3,593 
7,620 
1,082 


3,055 
370 


2,482 
310 


10,169 
4,810 


1,260 
719 


35,50( 
46,92: 




33,03' 






. 


Total liabilities 


12,295 
111,559 


3,425 
52,972 


2,792 
41,629 


14,979 
67,035 


1,979 
11,613 


115,45 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro 


878,101 














111,559 
28,907 

141,256 
14,512 


52,972 
7,317 

55,057 
1,987 


41,629 
8,917 

56,694 
3,338 


67,035 
15,753 

51,801 
450 


11,613 
18,901 

22,212 
3,594 


878,10 


CAPITAL 


90,50< 


Sinking fund debentures 




Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . . 


767,16 
58,61 








Total capital 


184,675 


64,361 


68,949 


68,004 


44,707 


916,27 




Total 


308,529 


120,758 


113,370 


150,018 


58,299 


1,909,83 




B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


105,809 
4,779 


30,898 
1,049 


26,769 
1,929 


58,723 
1,257 


17,548 
117 


607,36 
4,06 




Miscellaneous 




Total revenue 


110,588 


31,947 


28,698 


59,980 


17,665 


611,42 








EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


71,208 

6,137 
8,762 
1,307 
8,038 


27,699 

1,670 
3,137 

2,617 


18,593 

1,778 

2,555 

1,718 


42,637 

4,042 

6,378 

7 

2,998 


11,199 

1,458 
1,937 

1,772 


429,13 

27,32 
62,15 

7,2$ 

33,ie 




Local generation 

Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 




Total expense 


95,452 


35,123 


24,644 


56,062 


16,366 


559,1J 




Net income net expense 


15,136 


3,176 


4,054 


3,918 


1,299 


52,3i 




Number of customers 


829 


*m 


990 


A1C\ 


isfi 


3.6( 











Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 






177 


Lindsay 
11,756 


Listowel 

4,483 


London 

202,542 


L'Orignal 
1,295 


Lucan 
1,047 


Lucknow 
1,017 


Lynden 
581 


Madoc 
1,294 


Magneta- 
wan 

176 


1,654,141 
556,410 


598,842 
233,249 


32,392,566 
8,568,616 


157,292 
51,162 


147,421 
46,787 


110,823 
23,174 


53,545 
20,004 


224,043 
86,674 


35,279 
12,961 


1,097,731 

32,142 
25,000 

19,727 


365,593 

51,410 

20,000 

20,000 

3,444 

130 


23,823,950 

76,263 

252,764 

1,064,680 

21,660 


106,130 
19,647 

1,050 


100,634 
3,307 

2,060 
28 


87,649 

23,551 

24,000 

5,029 

502 


33,541 

12,081 

3,000 

5,000 

2,265 

10 


137,369 

18,752 

15,000 
2,524 


22,318 

5,881 

6,000 
62 


76,869 
20,259 
18,257 


94,984 
302 
161 


1,415,367 

1,155,295 

118,031 


20,697 
2,631 


5,395 
216 

14 


53,082 
8,419 


22,356 


36,276 
7,978 


11,943 
518 
490 


38,516 
1,234,495 


463 
543,752 


1,273,326 
15,306,467 


2,631 
31,032 


230 
100,530 


8,419 
149,062 


55,349 


7,978 
119,158 


1,008 
8,422 


2,447,611 


1,004,792 


41,819,110 


160,490 


206,789 


298,212 


111,246 


300,781 


43,691 


46,000 

62,757 

8,072 


11,400 
29,370 


7,815,490 

1,460,483 

767,083 


8,000 

6,297 

630 


4,835 
751 


4,352 


2,586 
146 


6,090 
1,546 


2,100 
1,680 


: 116,829 
1,234,495 


40,770 

543,752 


10,043,056 

15,306,467 
189,762 


14,927 
31,032 


5,586 
100,530 


4,352 
149,062 


2,732 
55,349 


7,636 
119,158 


3,780 
8,422 


1,234,495 
134,000 

959,193 
3,094 


543,752 
121,434 

293,418 
5,418 


15,496,229 
4,637,537 

11,390,088 
252,200 


31,032 
20,000 

93,578 
953 


100,530 
11,213 

89,460 


149,062 
17,614 

127,184 


55,349 
4,495 

48,670 


119,158 
14,000 

159,987 


8,422 
21,900 

9,589 


1.096,287 


420,270 


16,279,825 


114,531 


100,673 


144,798 


53,165 


173,987 


31,489 


2,447,611 

I 


1,004,792 


41,819,110 


160,490 


206,789 


298,212 


111,246 


300,781 


43,691 


'■ m 

851,677 
43,611 


294,926 
8,566 


12,288,798 
471,473 


60,345 
3,007 


60,962 
2,490 


72,495 
1,333 


27,008 
1,463 


73,662 
5,301 


9,774 
396 


895,288 


303,492 


12,760,271 


63,352 


63,452 


73,828 


28,471 


78,963 


10,170 


, 652,858 

65,236 

85,140 

4,760 

53,034 


210,111 

26,142 

17,467 

6,161 

19,465 


8,343,269 

904,677 
1,141,114 
1,018,354 

916,934 


41,353 

3,366 
4,792 
1,975 
6,424 


36,484 

5,420 
9,397 

5,068 


43,880 

3,107 
7,454 

3,730 


21,185 

1,283 
3,515 

2,058 


56,341 

3,932 
6,488 

9,028 


5,444 

636 
1,474 
1,956 
1,145 


861,028 


279,346 


12,324,348 


57,910 


56,369 


58,171 


28,041 


75,789 


10.655 


34,260 


24,146 


435,923 


5,442 


7,083 


15,657 


430 


3,174 


485 


4,417 


1,789 


64,122 


438 


411 


490 


183 


627 


121 



178 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financia 



Municipality 


Markdale 
1,058 


Markham 
8,724 


Marmora 
1,284 


Martintown 
377 


Massey 
1,313 






Population 


771 


A. BALANCE SHEET 

FIXED ASSETS 


105,346 
22,352 


914,990 
180,216 


144,009 
60,952 


38,602 
16,127 


119,284 

25,386 


110,294 


Less accumulated depreciation 


26,566 


Net fixed assets 


82,994 

12,941 
6,000 

10,000 
2,578 


734,774 
21,291 

18,169 

477 


83,057 

1,432 

3,000 
1,652 


22,475 
7,774 

2,760 
332 


93,898 

5,393 

4,000 

15,000 

3,167 

255 


83,728 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investments-short term 


24,466 


-long term 


7,226 




784 


Other 








( 




31,519 

729 

7,760 


39,937 
10,373 
29,920 


6,084 

4,038 


10,866 
637 


27,815 

179 

2,552 


32,47 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 










Total other assets 


8,489 
94,531 


40,293 
312,032 


4,038 
87,183 


637 
20,207 


2,731 
30,581 


75,20 












Total 


217,533 


1,127,036 


180,362 


54,185 


155,025 


191,40 




LIABILITIES 


5,048 
526 


117,562 
73,172 
88,519 


4,860 
900 


747 
60 


19,300 
4,585 
1,400 




Current Liabilities 


9,17 




19!l 








Total liabilities 


5,574 
94,531 


279,253 
312,032 


5,760 
87,183 


807 
20,207 


25,285 
30,581 


9,36 


RESERVES 


75.2C 


Other reserves 








94,531 
6,370 

111,058 


312,032 
76,257 

348,157 
111,337 


87,183 
15,092 

72,327 


20,207 
5,347 

27,824 


30,581 
25,700 

73,459 


75,2( 
13,6' 

91,4' 
1,7 




CAPITAL 








Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . . 








Total capital 


117,428 


535,751 


87,419 


33,171 


99,159 


106,8 




Total 


217,533 


1,127,036 


180,362 


54,185 


155,025 


191,4 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 
REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


63,089 
2,004 


486,725 
12,561 


65,038 
1,222 


11,588 
83 


55,106 
1,201 


47,4 
1,4 




Miscellaneous 






65,093 


499,286 


66,260 


11,671 


56,307 


48,8 








EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


46,777 

2,537 
4,615 

3,235 


358,403 

21,582 
43,341 
25,529 
25,361 


46,010 

7,934 
4,872 

5,225 


7,580 

1,243 
1,596 

1,325 


32,675 

5,793 
6,533 
3,914 
3,192 


33,( 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation 


3,< 

2,1 

3,: 




Other 


Total expense 


57,164 


474,216 


64,041 


11,744 


52,107 


42 r ' 




Net income net expense 


7,929 


25,070 


2,219 


73 


4,200 


6,! 






Number of customers 


517 


2,589 


5,29 


123 


391 







Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 






179 


McGarry 
Twp. 
2,054 


Meaford 
3,934 


Merlin 
627 


Merrick- 
ville 
914 


Midland 
10,477 


Mildmay 
951 


Millbrook 
881 


Milton 
6,552 


Milverton 
1,085 


91,326 
34,882 


453,800 
135,870 


105,231 
41,016 


97,973 
18,953 


1,222,416 
466,884 


89,458 
15,069 


101,032 
30,642 


963,536 
308,413 


152,947 
33,389 


56,444 

17,996 
12,000 

374 
10,000 


317,930 

15,295 

34,000 
9,223 


64,215 

12,920 

28,140 
739 


79,020 
11,461 

2,409 


755,532 
112,419 

20,692 
1,887 


74,389 
2,856 

7,500 

273 


70,390 

21,292 

5,000 
2,570 


655,123 

17,315 
160,000 

3,498 


119,558 

8,882 

6,000 

2,000 

166 

50 


1 40,370 


58,518 
16,844 
5,333 


41,799 
534 


13,870 

353 


134,998 

21,081 

317 


10,629 


28,862 
3,883 


180,813 

2,286 

122 


17,098 
314 


67,558 


22,177 
372,706 


534 
60,361 


353 
40,427 


21,398 
1,304,238 


60,515 


3,883 
48,773 


2,408 
616,928 


314 
190,503 


164,372 


771,331 


166,909 


133,670 


2,216,166 


145,533 


151,908 


1,455,272 


327,473 


802 
3,318 


59,000 

20,544 

8,524 


11,544 
280 


3,300 
5,286 
1,166 


77,785 
240,210 


2,699 
504 


6,808 
1,030 


34,171 

33,001 

6,163 


6,000 

5,552 

734 


4,120 
67,558 


88,068 
372,706 


11,824 
60,361 


9,752 
40,427 


317,995 
1,304,238 


3,203 
60,515 


7,838 
48,773 


73,335 
616,928 


12,286 
190,503 


67,558 
13,782 

78,912 


372,706 
48,725 

261,832 


60,361 
13,122 

81,562 
40 


40,427 
21,700 

58,366 
3,425 


1,304,238 
111,945 

481,988 


60,515 
12,304 

69,382 
129 


48,773 
9,000 

80,547 
5,750 


616,928 
89,604 

674,287 
1,118 


190,503 
. 18,259 

102,890 
3,535 


92,694 


310,557 


94,724 


83,491 


593,933 


81,815 


95,297 


765,009 


124,684 


1 164,372 


771,331 


166,909 


133,670 


2,216,166 


145,533 


151,908 


1,455,272 


327,473 


54,735 
1,509 


262,189 
6,343 


38,247 
3,403 


46,816 
80 


627,996 
1,009 


44,684 
933 


44,539 
3,224 


406,322 
29,035 


79,119 
1,098 


56,244 


268,532 


41,650 


46,896 


629,005 


45,617 


47,763 


435,357 


80,217 


, 39,629 

2,939 

9,691 

2 

3,193 


183,608 

14,023 

34,449 

5,148 

13,043 


21,651 

2,606 
6,301 

3,213 


34,447 

2,738 
3,174 
1,772 
2,794 


488,606 

45,580 
35,920 
11,639 
34,605 


25,467 

6,239 
4,960 

2,758 


27,297 

3,189 
3,462 

4,842 


295,994 

20,281 

40,468 

7,400 

32,282 


50,615 

8,563 
9,281 
1,127 
3,962 


| 55,454 


250,271 


33,771 


44,925 


616,350 


39,424 


38,790 


396,425 


73,548 


790 


18,261 


7,879 


1,971 


12,655 


6,193 


8,973 


38,932 


6,669 


418 


1,666 


284 


359 


3,632 


359 


343 


1,886 


499 



180 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 





Mississauga 
121,730 


Mitchell 
2,389 


Moorefield 
291 


Morrisburg 
1,940 


Mount 
Brydges 
1,150 




Population 


Forest 
2,804 




A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 


24,281,944 
3,056,804 


510,741 
108,276 


38,220 
13,212 


257,059 
72,090 


110,799 
19,117 


289 486 


Less accumulated depreciation 


81,203 




21,225,140 

412,000 

8,000 

553,502 

766,692 


402,465 
12,967 

5,876 

857 


25,008 

4,481 

1,000 
164 


184,969 

14,656 

11,000 
4,533 


91,682 
18,090 

682 


208,283 
26,235 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 




-long term 

Accounts receivable (net) 


15.000 
7,286 


Other 










1,740,194 
912,838 
115,096 


19,700 
16,964 

76 


5,645 


30,189 
12,112 


18,772 
195 


48,521 
7,051 
2,76( 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 






1,027,934 
5,172,944 


17,040 
295,632 


40,415 


12,112 
134,049 


195 
54,239 


9,811 
270 73' 








Total 


29,166,212 


734,837 


71,068 


361,319 


164,888 


537,35( 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 

Current liabilities 


3,908,835 
1,290,492 
2,825,095 


37,100 
16,062 
39,082 


1,546 


10,969 
2,547 


10,300 

3,295 

765 


- 

16,19: 

2 64( 


Other liabilities 






Total liabilities 


8,024,422 
5,172,944 


92,244 
295,632 


1,546 
40,415 


13,516 
134,049 


14,360 
54,239 


18,84! 
270,73: \ 


RESERVES 


Other reserves 






Total reserves 


5,172,944 

1,190,076 

8,811,693 
5,967,077 


295,632 
45,009 

299,881 
2,071 


40,415 

4,500 

24,607 


134,049 

31,636 

104,239 
77,879 


54,239 
8,760 

87,529 


270,73: 
21,62' 


CAPITAL 




Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


226,14 


Total capital 


15,968,846 


346,961 


29,107 


213,754 


96,289 


247,77 






Total 


29,166,212 


734,837 


71,068 


361,319 


164,888 


537,35 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


10,393,403 
198,994 


182,317 
10,372 


24,110 

267 


110,866 
1,659 


46,663 
860 


160,70 


Miscellaneous 


2,35 


Total revenue 


10,592,397 


192,689 


24,377 


112,525 


47,523 


163,05 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


7,335,990 

786,734 
579,348 
565,584 
582,303 


129,912 

10,769 

22,309 

4,852 

15,156 


18,496 

895 
972 

1,379 


80,735 

9,861 
15,393 

7,049 


28,766 

2,595 
4,346 
1,294 
3,303 


119,50 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 


11,31 
14,46 


Depreciation 


7,9* 


Other 




Total expense 


9,849,959 


182,998 


21,742 


113,038 


40,304 


153,26 


Net income net expense 


742,438 


9,691 


2,635 


513 


7,219 


9,7< 


Number of customers 


32 501 


1 n?7 


14Q 


RD4 


433 


1.2.' 







Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



181 





















Napanee 
4,717 


Nepean 

Twp. 

53,115 


Neustadt 
542 


Newboro 
299 


Newburgh 
594 


Newbury 
300 


Newcastle 
1,552 


New 
Hamburg 

2,553 


Newmarket 
9,544 


569,340 
218,887 


8,086,294 
1,238,928 


43,351 
21,972 


49,637 
13,436 


99,181 
35,695 


39,446 
12,905 


253,424 
78,613 


318,586 
64,713 


1,388,446 
332,437 


350,453 

59,072 
25,000 
22,000 
22,388 
221 


6,847,366 

668,076 
300,000 

107,812 
86,687 


21,379 

2,271 

3,000 
2,277 


36,201 

2,412 

2,000 

522 


63,486 
7,988 

624 


26,541 
4,081 

587 


174,811 

6,307 

4,000 
3,644 


253,873 
50 

1,944 
760 


1,056,009 

86,509 
25,000 

9,752 
4,830 


128,681 

7,763 


1,162,575 
124,578 
140,522 


7,548 


4,934 
1,326 


8,612 


4,668 
30 


13,951 
5,506 

28 


2,754 

1,816 

445 


126,091 

7,334 

16,169 


7,763 
493,474 


265,100 
987,444 


43,293 


1,326 
9,083 


22,704 


30 
24,995 


5,534 
93,513 


2,261 
260,800 


23,503 
560,925 


980,371 


9,262,485 


72,220 


51,544 


94,802 


56,234 


287,809 


519,688 


1,766,528 


17,053 
9,195 


6,001,000 
615,890 
385,087 


1,750 
139 


1,109 
981 

45 


3,247 
238 


1,832 


14,000 
12,199 
29,475 


2,000 

18,933 

1,228 


21,269 

178,043 
16,768 


J 26,248 
493,474 


7,001,977 

987,444 


1,889 
43,293 


2,135 
9,083 


3,485 

22,704 


1,832 
24,995 


55,674 
93,513 


22,161 
260,800 


216,080 
560,925 


493,474 

70,000 

« 

389,832 
817 


987,444 

449,000 

656,501 
167,563 


43,293 
15,504 

11,534 


9,083 
15,891 

21,466 
2,969 


22,704 

14,000 

48,618 
5,995 


24,995 

9,754 

19,428 

225 


93,513 

29,744 

108,878 


260,800 
30,264 

205,713 
750 


560,925 
73,580 

775,898 
140,045 


460,649 


1,273,064 


27,038 


40,326 


68,613 


29,407 


138,622 


236,727 


989,523 


980,371 


9,262,485 


72,220 


51,544 


94,802 


56,234 


287,809 


519,688 


1,766,528 


■ 

239,207 

22,172 


3,313,472 
135,534 


24,557 
308 


15,576 
293 


26,562 
989 


17,329 
17 


91,858 
4,849 


144,324 
2,687 


594,501 
15,769 


261,379 


3,449,006 


24,865 


15,869 


27,551 


17,346 


96,707 


147,011 


610,270 


172,630 

21,093 
50,826 

18,454 


2,095,637 

147,253 
324,571 
498,632 
197,600 


19,244 

1,049 
1,834 

1,690 


9,011 

1,076 
2,182 
1,143 
1,659 


15,808 

2,163 
3,028 

3,544 


14,274 

839 
1,340 

1,323 


58,054 

3,880 

12,542 

4,954 

9,075 


103,672 

8,766 

18,087 

1,210 

9,191 


447,623 

42,143 

66,404 

6,826 

38,646 


| 

1 263,003 


3,263,693 


23,817 


15,071 


24,543 


17,776 


88,505 


140,926 


601,642 


1,624 


185,313 


1,048 


798 


3,008 


430 


8,202 


6,085 


8,628 


1,814 


13,476 


227 


169 


200 


150 


601 


923 


3.03! 



182 


Municipal 


Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical 


Utilities Financial 


Municipality 


Niagara 
3,088 


Niagara 

Falls 
56,851 


Nipigon 
Twp. 
2,680 


North Bay 
46,392 


North 

York 

420,177 


Norwich 
1,705 


Population 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 


394,041 
120,404 


8,269,431 
1,914,404 


272,693 
96,881 


5,672,133 
1,664,193 


47,306,222 
9,995,027 


147,781 
54,116 


Less accumulated depreciation 




273,637 

17,752 

14,000 

8,000 

1,213 

42 


6,355,027 

182,704 

63,000 
57,273 
15,680 


175,812 

20,224 

8,500 
3,053 


4,007,940 

6,946 
205,000 
385,000 
185,466 

4,428 


37,311,195 

240,787 

4,000,000 

16,300 

1,292,403 

9,565 


93,665 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


17,463 1 

7,500 
3,569 1 


-long term 


Other 




41,007 

15,569 

38 


318,657 
283,703 
111,502 


31,777 
183 


786,840 

. 70,681 

42,055 


5,559,055 

667,676 

3,119,645 

212,941 


28,532 \ 
7,030 ] 


OTHER ASSETS 


Sinking fund on debentures 






15,607 
256,232 


395,205 
4,568,053 


183 
185,915 


112,736 
2,507,177 


4,000,262 
14,150,706 


7,030 
175,052 






Total 


586,483 


11,636,942 


393,687 


7,414,693 


61,021,218 


304,279 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


11,117 

10,680 

3,074 


1,253,739 
128,255 
162,347 


10,023 
4,450 


1,585,780 
354,906 
112,648 


10,901,743 

2,167,467 

351,038 


5,514 




1,103 








24,871 
256,232 


1,544,341 
4,568,053 


14,473 
185,915 


2,053,334 

2,507,177 
1,586 


13,420,248 
14,150,706 


6,617 1 


RESERVES 


175,052 j 










Total reserves 


256,232 
69,391 

231,989 
4,000 


4,568,053 
1,773,343 

3,385,094 
366,111 


185,915 
10,000 

183,299 


2,508,763 
783,878 

1,963,261 
105,457 


14,150,706 

4,594,696 
3,119,645 

23,979,874 
1,756,049 


175,052 • 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


13,75* | 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


108,85< 


Total capital 


305,380 


5,524,548 


193,299 


2,852,596 


33,450,264 


122,61(1 


Total 


586,483 


11,636,942 


393,687 


7,414,693 


61,021,218 


304,27' 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 
REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


152,597 
6,595 


3,510,107 
23,701 


129,362 
6,685 


2,587,562 
128,187 


24,915,386 
959,299 


•a 


Miscellaneous 


Total revenue 


159,192 


3,533,808 


136,047 


2,715,749 


25,874,685 


72,65 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


95,063 

20,904 

20,723 

2,568 

12,569 


2,107,374 

397,459 
297,376 
162,862 
202,568 


83,713 

11,835 
23,592 

8,884 


1,658,137 

210,581 
342,442 
180,686 
191,174 


17,235,852 

1,411,715 
1,621,752 
1,266,715 
1,562,176 


i 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 


Total expense 


151,827 


3,167,639 


128,024 


2,583,020 


23,098,210 


74,0- 




Net income net expense 


7,365 


366,169 


8,023 


132,729 


2,776,475 


1.41 




Number of customers 


1,183 


17,931 


791 


14,709 


122,324 


r - 





Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



183 



Norwood 
1,058 


Oakville 

55,531 


Oil Springs 
544 


Omemee 
842 


Orangeville 
6,649 


Orillia 
20,532 


Orono 
987 


Oshawa 
82,324 


Ottawa 
318,014 


' 150,522 
66,246 


9,413,863 
2,287,678 


88,752 
30,099 


110,247 
40,038 


730,620 
153,896 


7,035,874 
1,847,790 


135,098 
32,558 


12,930,580 
3,771,923 


46,183,152 
10,486,099 


1 84,276 

[ 11,813 

23,000 
1,477 


7,126,185 

2,542 

350,000 

35,500 

389,820 

5,071 


58,653 

9,343 

1 1 ,000 
112 


70,209 

4,112 

5,500 
2,197 


576,724 
100 

8,513 

222 


5,188,084 

500 

41,488 
106,939 


102,540 

2,865 

2,500 
4,694 


9,158,657 

1,442 

550,797 

400,000 

663,098 

49 


35,697,053 

821,636 
975,000 
355,000 
1,383,729 
195,108 


1 36,290 

_. 

621 


782,933 

173,512 

53,299 


20,455 
348 


11,809 

354 


8,835 

18,131 

7,328 


148,927 
95,719 
21,371 


10,059 
145 

5,552 


1,615,386 

385,292 

54,759 


3,730,473 
915,184 


621 
78,480 


226,811 
3,290,521 


348 
87,630 


354 
49,929 


25,459 
439,523 


117,090 
472,069 


5,697 
51,705 


440,051 
7,774,664 


915,184 
15,001,827 


199,667 


11,426,450 


167,086 


132,301 


1,050,541 


5,926,170 


170,001 


18,988,758 


55,344,537 


\ 3,857 
912 


2,598,580 
719,107 

505,527 


1,727 
342 


4,732 
447 


138,500 

60,234 

2,724 


1,402,116 
106,519 
282,725 


29,100 
6,922 
1,929 


1,984,000 

1,027,059 

119,422 


1,490,000 
2,207,569 


1 4,769 
78,480 


3,823,214 
3,290,521 


2,069 
87,630 


5,179 
49,929 


201,458 
439,523 


1,791,360 

472,069 
41,488 


37,951 
51,705 


3,130,481 
7,774,664 


3,697,569 

15,001,827 
269,828 


78,480 
55,100 

57,936 
| 3,382 


3,290,521 
1,322,899 

2,483,563 
506,253 


87,630 
16,722 

60,665 


49,929 
12,000 

61,693 
3,500 


439,523 
39,094 

370,466 


513,557 
2,465,384 

985,299 
170,570 


51,705 
13,748 

66,597 


7,774,664 
716,622 

6,840,074 
526,917 


15,271,655 
8,400,698 

23,300,513 
4,674,102 


116,418 


4,312,715 


77,387 


77,193 


409,560 


3,621,253 


80,345 


8,083,613 


36,375,313 


199,667 


11,426,450 


167,086 


132,301 


1,050,541 


5,926,170 


170,001 


18,988,758 


55,344,537 


! 48,605 
3,807 


5,925,071 
193,154 


27,597 
764 


44,079 
1,824 


362,139 
9,823 


1,230,605 
17,342 


61,164 
1,203 


6,181,517 

305,277 


19,501,462 
668,777 


52,412 


6,118,225 


28,361 


45,903 


371,962 


1,247,947 


62,367 


6,486,794 


20,170,239 


! 35,935 

' 4,016 
f 4,943 

f 6,797 


4,706,390 

248,467 
318,615 
344,206 
306,023 


17,489 

1,512 
6,310 

2,882 


27,690 

6,012 
3,703 

4,501 


244,784 

19,044 
49,999 
13,453 
24,353 


586,126 
191,058 
104,707 
117,545 
188,761 
165,436 
10,000 


38,505 

4,135 
9,371 
3,566 
3,610 


4,765,739 

404,220 
412,339 
193,702 
466,831 


13,328,117 

327,451 

1,758,758 

997,864 

624,041 

1,337,606 

57,422 


| 51,691 


5,923,701 


28,193 


41,906 


351,633 


1,363,633 


59,187 


6,242,831 


18,431,259 


721 


194,524 


168 


3,997 


20,329 


115,686 


3,180 


243,963 


1,738,980 


438 


15,675 


251 


330 


2,539 


7,294 


392 


24,823 


100,503 



184 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financi; 



















Otterville 

807 


Owen 
Sound 
18,259 


Paisley 
708 


Palmerston 
1,659 


Paris 
6,428 


Parkhill 


Population 


1,160 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


92,256 
33,110 


2,523,153 
787,788 


97,413 
24,644 


288,931 
90,529 


808,677 
276,797 


177 31C 


Less accumulated depreciation 


44,177 


Net fixed assets 


59,146 

5,232 

371 


1,735,365 
5,515 

98,243 
2,820 


72,769 

2,139 

21,000 
4,199 


198,402 
14,505 

2,378 


531,880 

48,325 
30,000 

7,248 
285 


133 13" 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investments— short term 


16,044 


-long term 


6,00( 

2,67.' , 

8.' 


Other 




5,603 
117 


106,578 

47,310 

1,488 


27,338 

16 

3,967 


16,883 
393 


85,858 
1,201 


24,80' 
2,11' 

3,08( 


OTHER ASSETS 


Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 








117 
58,926 


48,798 
1,829,985 


3,983 
79,541 


393 
229,164 


1,201 

624,954 


5,19' 
138,48( 


Equity in Ontario Hydro 




Total 


123,792 


3,720,726 


183,631 


444,842 


1,243,893 


301,61 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 

Current liabilities 


2,408 
382 


83,153 
7,587 


4,004 
388 


7,000 
10,894 


55,252 
25,991 
10,229 


1,801 

6,39' 

42" 


Other liabilities 






Total liabilities 


2,790 
58,926 


90,740 
1,829,985 


4,392 
79,541 


17,894 
229,164 


91,472 
624,954 


8,62i 
138,48i 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro 


Other reserves 






Total reserves 


58,926 
4,500 

57,576 


1,829,985 
208,372 

1,591,629 


79,541 
13,623 

86,075 


229,164 
35,000 

143,747 
19,037 


624,954 
144,355 

379,606 
3,506 


138,48 
28,06 

126,44 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


Sinking fund debentures 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


Total capital 


62,076 


1,800,001 


99,698 


197,784 


527,467 


154,50 




Total 


123,792 


3,720,726 


183,631 


444,842 


1,243,893 


301,61 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


31,863 
566 


1,133,378 
55,577 


37,752 
1,576 


101,761 
333 


326,066 

5,224 


80,05 
3,06 


Miscellaneous 


Total revenue 


32,429 


1,188,955 


39,328 


102,094 


331,290 


83,11 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 

Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


20,369 

2,004 
3,485 

3,334 


859,632 

100,472 
119,229 

87,294 


24,486 

2,170 
6,312 

2,499 


61,930 

10,932 

14,405 

1,482 

8,093 


226,693 

31,881 

29,415 

9,217 

25,656 


49,89 

7,1S 

11,74 

97 

6,01 


Financial 

Depreciation 


Other 


Total expense 


29,192 


1,166,627 


35,467 


96,842 


322,862 


75,81 


Net income net expense 


3,237 


22,328 


3,861 


5,252 


8,428 


7,2< 




Number of customers 


299 


6,411 


328 


716 


2,229 


5; 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



185 



Parry 
Sound 
5,670 


Pembroke 
15,142 


Penetang- 
uishene 
5,003 


Perth 

5,334 


Peter- 
borough 

54,782 


Petrolia 

3,469 


Pickering 
1,966 


Picton 
4,694 


Planta- 

genet 

855 


1,283,221 
395,708 


3,229,369 
1,307,716 


422,610 
170,096 


729,557 
258,374 


10,437,138 
3,571,968 


525,264 
170,353 


186,456 
60,808 


681,486 

228,323 


105,968 
32,089 


887,513 

12,812 
70,000 
14,500 
15,909 
1,351 


1,921,653 

115,000 

71,353 
25,103 


252,514 

15,950 

10,000 
7,900 


471,183 

85,767 

10,000 
4,540 


6,865,170 
134,007 

268,133 
11,956 


354,911 

47,791 

15,000 
16,437 


125,648 

2,407 
20,000 

3,691 


453,163 
25,250 

5,611 
2,026 


73,879 
25,460 

480 


1 114,572 

15,868 

506 


211,456 

29,770 

104,781 


33,850 
977 


100,307 
11,590 


414,096 

114,879 

19,403 


79,228 
19,666 
17,383 


26,098 
1,994 


32,887 

22,031 

8,531 


25,940 
1,525 


16,374 
197,756 


134,551 
18,726 


977 
386,061 


11,590 
613,704 


134,282 
4,828,227 


37,049 
450,641 


1,994 
44,991 


30,562 
545,883 


1,525 
27,834 


1,216,215 


2,286,386 


673,402 


1,196,784 


12,241,775 


921,829 


198,731 


1,062,495 


129,178 


35,500 
67,591 


2,095,000 

159,375 

32,885 


18,093 
2,888 


23,137 
87 


1,785,600 

587,852 

12,317 


28,456 
5,534 


46,000 

10,292 

1,593 


45,000 
23,741 
11,203 


48,500 

8,764 

952 


103,091 

|| 197,756 
2,310 


2,287,260 
18,726 


20,981 
386,061 


23,224 
613,704 


2,385,769 
4,828,227 


33,990 
450,641 


57,885 
44,991 


79,944 
545,883 


58,216 
27,834 


200,066 
, 433,000 

472,774 
7,284 


18,726 
55,000 

81,857 
7,257 


386,061 
36,983 

229,377 


613,704 
85,045 

455,096 
19,715 


4,828,227 
1,544,011 

3,233,607 
v 250,161 


450,641 
50,000 

387,198 


44,991 
26,655 

68,980 
220 


545,883 
68,182 

368,486 


27,834 
6,500 

35,062 
1,566 


913,058 


19,600 


266,360 


559,856 


5,027,779 


437,198 


95,855 


436,668 


43,128 


1,216,215 




2,286,386 


673,402 


1,196,784 


12,241,775 


921,829 


198,731 


1,062,495 


129,178 


— 

385,592 
25,322 


891,083 
22,346 


226,013 
3,126 


323,744 
3,794 


3,836,458 
160,641 


235,008 
6,306 


82,587 
5,269 


288,274 
3,896 


50,027 
3,534 


410,914 


913,429 


229,139 


327,538 


3,997,099 


241,314 


87,856 


292,170 


53,561 


191,466 
36,311 
39,932 
43,974 
6,200 
37,043 


480,054 

11,000 

54,305 

108,986 

197,762 

95,807 


169,387 

17,639 
22,298 

13,678 


229,545 

14,611 
31,845 

21,216 


2,669,775 

365,526 
343,396 
231,624 
354,193 


130,454 

34,462 
45,198 

13,018 


58,697 

7,120 

8,181 
6,750 
7,656 


185,108 

31,575 

27,393 

4,575 

19,907 


36,585 

2,245 
4,574 
4,925 
4,139 


354,926 


947,914 


223,002 


297,217 


3,964,514 


223,132 


88,404 


268,558 


52,468 


55,988 


34,485 


6,137 


30,321 


32,585 


18,182 


548 


23,612 


1,093 


2,235 


5,109 


1,514 


2,175 


17,759 


1,446 


606 


1,847 


260 



186 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financh 



Municipality 

Population 


Plattsville 

558 


Point 
Edward 

2,823 


Port 
Arthur 
46,990 


Port 

Burwell 

661 


Port 

Colborne 

18,168 


Port 
Credit 
8,261 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


75,444 
15,626 


332,318 
110,820 


8,075,790 
2,938,837 


120,230 
48,985 


2,021,434 
501,080 


1,358,99* 


Less accumulated depreciation 


289,45: 


Net fixed assets 


59,818 

13,214 

10,000 

2,500 

243 


221,498 

55,311 
10,000 

10,574 
1,185 


5,136,953 

636,226 
650,000 

99,208 
366,505 

11,471 


71,245 
5,531 

1,300 
225 


1,520,354 

52,363 
25,000 
10,000 
10,602 


1,069,54' 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investments-short term 


14,561 
25,00' 




13,50i 


Accounts receivable (net) 


54,89 


Other 


20 






Total current assets 


25,957 
71 


77,070 

181 

16,940 


1,763,410 
190,258 


7,056 

124 
873 


97,965 
32,951 
15,501 


108,16 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 


23,03 
7,16 








71 
82,848 


17,121 
613,802 


190,258 
12,415,480 


997 
33,523 


48,452 
1,078,451 


30,20 


Equity in Ontario Hydro 


960,30 






Total 


168,694 


929,491 


19,506,101 


112,821 


2,745,222 


2,168,22 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


4,378 


35,298 


224,000 
276,995 


17,500 
5,694 
1,690 


301,908 
67,000 
16,867 


212,80 
112,11 


Other liabilities 


8,43 






Total liabilities 


4,378 
82,848 


35,298 
613,802 


500,995 

12,415,480 
102,175 


24,884 
33,523 


385,775 
1,078,451 


333,34 
960,3C 


RESERVES 


Other reserves 




Total reserves 


82,848 
5,237 

76,231 


613,802 
17,000 

263,391 


12,517,655 

752,317 

5,660,094 
75,040 


33,523 
22,500 

28,459 
3,455 


1,078,451 
313,751 

961,543 
5,702 


960,3( 
113,3* 

755,1 

6,01 


CAPITAL 


Sinking fund debentures 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


Total capital 


81,468 


280,391 


6,487,451 


54,414 


1,280,996 


874,5 


Total 


168,694 


929,491 


19,506,101 


112,821 


2,745,222 


2,168,2 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


46,679 
1,521 


340,797 
6,352 


2,866,173 
164,414 


36,310 
464 


878,119 
15,275 


1,023,3 
19,6 


Miscellaneous 


Total revenue 


48,200 


347,149 


3,030,587 


36,774 


893,394 


1,043,0 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


42,241 

2,073 
1,842 

2,337 


287,530 

10,354 
28,068 

10,182 


2,017,485 

25,497 

246,775 

241,749 

35,087 

266,069 


15,192 

7,739 
4,700 
2,953 
3,735 


556,972 

83,517 

113,536 

31,749 

56,715 


857,5 

31,3 
79,5 
11,7 

39,0 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 


Total expense 


48,493 


336,134 


2,832,662 


34,319 


842,489 


1,019,1 


Net income net expense 


293 


11,015 


197,925 


2,455 


50,905 


23,6 


Number of customers 


208 


901 


14 902 


429 


5.611 


U 




iii 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



187 





















Port 
Dover 
3,288 


Port Elgin 
2,055 


Port Hope 
8,734 


Port 

McNicoll 

1,259 


Port Perry 
2,746 


Port 

Rowan 

841 


Port 

Stanley 
1,470 


Prescott 
5,518 


Preston 
14,644 


447,099 
157,445 


387,978 
83,162 


1,286,996 
472,160 


147,140 
36,271 


325,530 
64,289 


102,343 
26,510 


244,912 
117,464 


521,266 
204,081 


2,032,642 
599,898 


289,654 

49,267 
. 30,000 

; 5,825 


304,816 
15,629 

6,543 


814,836 
40,277 

4,323 


110,869 

2,964 

25,850 

6,364 

23 


261,241 

8,882 

7,000 
3,760 


75,833 
10,177 

1,116 


127,448 
29,439 

3,494 
589 


317,185 

38,927 

20,000 
4,000 


1,432,744 

58,012 
25,000 

18,328 
2,669 


• 

85,092 

580 


22,172 
2,431 
7,562 


44,600 
58,360 


35,201 
795 


19,642 
1 


11,293 

60 

110 


33,522 
335 
590 


62,927 
10,509 


104,009 
46,196 


580 
268,698 


9,993 
196,887 


58,360 

954,753 


795 
118,161 


185,107 


170 
53,605 


925 
226,130 


10,509 
463,238 


46,196 
1,456,460 


644,024 


533,868 


1,872,549 


265,026 


465,991 


140,901 


388,025 


853,859 


3,039,409 


39,948 
17,403 
5,140 


11,633 


45,782 
27,532 


12,107 
962 


82,000 

20,250 

2,760 


5,900 

4,485 

573 


5,485 
1,367 


22,019 
5,294 


56,600 
64,714 
27,235 


j| 62,491 
, 268,698 


11,633 
196,887 


73,314 
954,753 


13,069 
118,161 


105,010 
185,107 


10,958 
53,605 


6,852 
226,130 


27,313 
463,238 


148,549 
1,456,460 


268,698 
, 68,580 

,236,701 

7,554 


196,887 
37,787 

287,561 


954,753 
244,000 

600,482 


118,161 
9,804 

123,992 


185,107 
22,882 

151,719 
1,273 


53,605 
12,100 

64,200 
38 


226,130 
18,950 

135,168 
925 


463,238 
23,981 

324,073 
15,254 


1,456,460 
419,683 

978,051 
36,666 


1,312,835 


325,348 


844,482 


133,796 


175,874 


76,338 


155,043 


363,308 


1,434,400 


644,024 


533,868 


1,872,549 


265,026 


465,991 


140,901 


388,025 


853,859 


3,039,409 


(172,310 
6,743 


181,382 
4,344 


625,166 
24,238 


68,566 
2,893 


149,151 
5,364 


30,969 
1,053 


101,714 
1,616 


268,174 
15,024 


924,971 
13,671 


j 179,05 3 


185,726 


649,404 


71,459 


154,515 


32,022 


103,330 


283 198 


938,642 


j 100,028 

1 26,496 
\ 18,563 
► 6,261 
6 15,969 


111,020 

16,875 
21,777 

9,878 


421,271 

64,612 
77,584 

44,447 


48,307 

7,068 
8,557 

4,134 


109,118 

13,355 

13,976 

8,485 

9,671 


19,716 

3,455 

2,880 

931 

3,106 


57,753 

19,926 
15,400 

8,323 


210,348 

15,344 
25,285 

21,418 


637,465 

79,784 
63,985 
18,910 
60,894 


'167,317 


159,550 


607,914 


68,066 


154,605 


30,088 


101,402 


272,395 


861,038 


11,736 


26,176 


41,490 


3,393 


90 


1,934 


1,928 


10,803 


77,604 


1,574 


1,264 


3,053 


627 


1,056 


366 


1,163 


1,936 


4,261 



188 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 

















Municipality 


Priceville 
136 


Princeton 

434 


Queenston 
561 


Rainy River 
1,087 


Red Rock 
1,922 


Renfrew 
8,470 


Population 


A. BALANCE SHEET 

FIXED ASSETS 


20,091 
8,930 


45,346 
13,585 


58,129 
18,311 


143,832 
71,666 


131,040 
32,051 


1,831,728 
550,722 


Less accumulated depreciation 


Net fixed assets 


11,161 

3,965 

8,000 
152 


31,761 

7,886 

3,000 
888 


39,818 

7,695 

8,000 
531 


72,166 

7,523 
25,000 

2,474 
959 


98,989 
2,529 

1,012 


1,281,006 

30,239 

20,000 

6,675 

4,443 

2,985 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


-long term 


Other 




12,117 


11,774 
2,141 


16,226 


35,956 
1,685 


3,541 


64,342 

17,727 

5,902 


OTHER ASSETS 


Sinking fund on debentures 






7,665 


2,141 
55,308 


49,447 


1,685 
33,690 


77,872 


23,629 
349,398 


Equity in Ontario Hydro 




Total 


30,943 


100,984 


105,491 


143,497 


180,402 


1,718,375 




LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


525 
1,062 


1,899 
489 


1,797 

252 


4,424 
427 


4,863 
414 


68 76' 


Current liabilities 


5 7,3 If 
6,90' 


Other liabilities 




Total liabilities 


1,587 
7,665 


2,388 
55,308 


2,049 
49,447 


4,851 
33,690 


5,277 
77,872 


132,98' 
349,39! 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro 


Other reserves 






Total reserves 


7,665 
11,641 

10,050 


55,308 
5,995 

37,258 
35 


49,447 
9,500 

44,261 

234 


33,690 
26,087 

78,869 


77,872 
29,367 

58,818 
9,068 


349,39! 
702,47 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


Sinking fund debentures 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


532,80 

71 






Total capital 


21,691 


43,288 


53,995 


104,956 


97,253 


1,235,99 




Total 


30,943 


100,984 


105,491 


143,497 


180,042 


1,718,37 




B. OPERATING STATEMENT 
REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


5,928 
424 


19,548 
909 


22,954 
1,177 


69,237 
3,206 


59,710 
1,064 


434,28 
4,7C 


Miscellaneous 




Total revenue 


6,352 


20,457 


24,131 


72,443 


60,774 


438,9* 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


3,188 

481 
847 
435 
735 


16,286 

1,496 

1,776 

1,516 


18,773 

1,004 
1,565 

2,174 


42,281 

10,243 
13,184 

4,935 


42,705 

5,393 
5,918 

4,108 


262,3? 
42,1' 
29,1! 
40,9.' 
19,75 

45, i: 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


Financial 


Depreciation 


Other 






Total expense 


5,686 


21,074 


23,516 


70,643 


58,124 


439,5 ( 


Net income net expense . . . 


666 


617 


615 


1,800 


2,650 


• 




Number of customers 


74 


183 1 


18Q 


43H 


380 


2 9' 















Statements A and B 






189 


itatements for the 


Year Ended December 31. 


1968 








Richmond 


Richmond 
Hill 


Ridgetown 


Ripley 


Rockland 


Rockwood 


Rodney 


Rosseau 


Russell 


1,418 


19,431 


2,784 


406 


3,494 


925 


1,072 


242 


604 


168,147 
30,937 


2,096,105 

592,243 


380,943 
83,536 


57,197 
13,823 


224,046 
53,413 


90,071 
18,072 


90,682 
32,593 


38,483 
9,263 


73,088 
19,133 


137,210 


1,503,862 


297,407 


43,374 


170,633 


71,999 


58,089 


29,220 


53,955 


2,513 


106,800 
75,000 

38,045 


13,008 

3,596 
50 


11,632 

6,000 

8,000 

1,691 

925 


14,574 
4,052 


1,541 
12,416 


18,474 

6,234 
90 


2,971 

2,500 

1,013 

140 


7,099 

823 


2,513 


219,845 


16,654 


28,248 


18,626 


13,957 


24,798 


6,624 


7,922 


- 


23,160 


716 


-- 


795 


91 


468 


- 


- 


- 


7,379 


2,644 


2,257 


2,184 


- 


2,112 




10 


60,294 


30,539 
733,677 


3,360 
251,590 


2,257 
58,092 


2,979 
78,680 


91 
68,076 


2,580 
88,768 


24,441 


10 
45,117 


200,017 


2,487,923 


569,011 


131,971 


270,918 


154,123 


174,235 


60,285 


107,004 


15,200 

7,076 

794 


387,113 

108,943 

15,953 


50,713 

16,955 

3,681 


2,521 
369 


36,500 

10,565 

7,866 


13,533 

4,841 

576 


5,657 
670 


1,547 


2,967 
126 


23,070 


512,009 


71,349 


2,890 


54,931 


18,950 


6,327 


1,547 


3,093 


60,294 


733,677 


251,590 


58,092 


78,680 


68,076 


88,768 


24,441 


45,117 


60,294 


733,677 


251,590 


58,092 


78,680 


68,076 


88,768 


24,441 


45,117 


19,687 


327,339 


61,657 


12,744 


18,500 


8,795 


8,500 


11,933 


8,808 


94,666 
2,300 


903,768 
11,130 


179,420 
4,995 


58,245 


118,457 
350 


54,750 
3,552 


70,640 


22,364 


49,986 


: 116,653 


1,242,237 


246,072 


70,989 


137,307 


67,097 


79,140 


34,297 


58,794 


200,017 


2,487,923 


569,011 


131,971 


270,918 


154,123 


174,235 


60,285 


107,004 


70,579 
1,427 


992,519 
51,626 


169,505 
1,557 


28,473 
732 


114,190 
905 


44,851 
561 


50,728 
1,635 


11,755 
350 


27,799 
370 


72,006 


1,044,145 


171,062 


29,205 


115,095 


45,412 


52,363 


12,105 


28,169 


55,371 


742,008 


98,142 


20,178 


83,673 


31,848 


30,247 


6,885 


22,020 


2,663 
3,002 
1,972 


35,301 
96,794 
60,212 
78,139 


19,623 

23,109 

8,133 

10,241 


1,368 

2,303 

1,910 


6,855 
7,011 
4,725 
6,896 


1,874 

5,131 

705 

2,809 


6,035 
5,915 

3 216 


1,649 
1,139 

1,156 


682 
2,604 

2,099 




1,012,454 


159,248 


25,759 


109,160 


42,367 


45,413 


10,829 


27,405 


4,613 


31,691 


11,814 


3,446 


5,935 


3,045 


6,950 


1,276 


764 


492 


5,493 


1,166 


229 


939 


336 


455 


134 


230 



190 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financia 

















Municipality 


St. 

Catharines 

100,799 


St. Clair 
Beach 
1,858 


St. George 
914 


St. Jacobs 
935 


St. Marys 
4,758 


St. Thomas 
23,206 


Population 




A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


13,894,941 
2,870,706 


149,189 

51,274 


89,298 
22,027 


93,922 
20,214 


692,470 
228,342 


3,159,241 
990,369 


Less accumulated depreciation 


Net fixed assets 


11,024,235 
302,968 

734,317 
9,244 


97,915 

7,985 
25,000 

5,223 


67,271 
11,675 

213 


73,708 

29,440 

2,000 
2,555 


464,128 

74,939 
37,500 
20,000 
11,711 


2,168,872 
50C 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investments-short term 


—long term : 


35,00C 

129.56C 

2,52£ 


Accounts receivable (net) 


Other 




Total current assets 


1,046,529 

304,631 

40,833 


38,208 
447 


11,888 
45 


33,995 


144,150 
12,005 
62,188 


167,58* 

110,79' 

68' 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 


Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 






Total other assets 


345,464 
10,001,811 


447 
70,048 


45 
82,309 


105,209 


74,193 
989,534 


111,48' 
2,698,86: 


Equity in Ontario Hydro 




Total 


22,418,039 


206,618 


161,513 


212,912 


1,672,005 


5,146,81 




LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


1,431,000 

1,212,673 

157,385 


9,230 
333 


9,300 

3,976 

220 


3,944 
90 


8,610 

20,885 

2,377 


152,00 
115,05 
62,37 


Current liabilities 


Other liabilities 




Total liabilities 


2,801,058 
10,001,811 


9,563 
70,048 


13,496 
82,309 


4,034 
105,209 


31,872 
989,534 


329,43 
2,698,86 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro 


Other reserves 






Total reserves 


10,001,811 
472,709 

8,712,805 
429,656 


70,048 
17,694 

99,257 
10,056 


82,309 
6,700 

58,705 
303 


105,209 
6,000 

97,669 


989,534 
181,597 

469,002 


2,698,86 
186,57 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 






Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


1,927,65 

4,2: 






Total capital 


9,615,170 


127,007 


65,708 


103,669 


650,599 


2,118,5! 






Total 


22,418,039 


206,618 


161,513 


212,912 


1,672,005 


5,146,81 






B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


7,455,509 
108,463 


69,565 
2,051 


42,117 
937 


58,990 
1,197 


259,902 
10,017 


1,607,41 


Miscellaneous 


12,4i 






Total revenue 


7,563,972 


71,616 


43,054 


60,187 


269,919 


1,619,8 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


5,899,476 

454,760 
484,625 
166,599 
361,312 


49,085 

7,777 
7,399 

4,901 


31,815 

2,229 
4,635 
1,413 
2,802 


41,351 

2,782 
2,960 

2,746 


151,896 

22,722 

35,538 

4,934 

18,632 


1,073,1 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


258,5 
118,2 


Financial 


16,8 


Depreciation 


86,4 


Other 








Total expense 


7,366,772 


69,162 


42,894 


49,839 


233,722 


1,553,3 






Net income net expense 


197,200 


2,454 


160 


10,348 


36,197 


66,4 






Number of customers 


30,917 


535 


327 


288 


1.815 


8.5 




■\ 



Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 






191 


Sandwich 
West 
8,922 


Sarnia 
56,007 


Scarborough 
280,491 


Schreiber 
Twp. 
2,130 


Seaforth 
2,203 


Shelburne 
1,395 


Simcoe 
10,138 


Sioux 

Lookout 

2,704 


Smiths 
Falls 
9,953 


846,824 
266,045 


8,319,706 
2,338,666 


32,840,048 
8,331,701 


212,341 
67,548 


380,924 
102,837 


227,431 
69,462 


1,214,074 
402,423 


323,615 
98,501 


1,276,021 
402,715 


580,779 
16,099 

17,677 

42 


5,981,040 

38,740 

194,674 

287,480 

3,104 


24,508,347 

375,299 

1,305,000 

25,000 

1,374,157 

4,082 


144,793 

13,891 

15,000 

5,000 

2,441 

677 


278,087 

18,737 

9,000 

1,874 

90 


157,969 
50 

6,700 
200 


811,651 

9,516 

564 


225,114 

11,744 

69,000 

5,000 

634 


873,306 

110,297 

20,000 
12,776 


33,818 
10,036 
10,926 


523,998 

275,292 

41,582 


3,083,538 

495,246 

2,747,525 

809,676 


37,009 
2,378 


29,701 
143 
359 


6,950 
3,538 


10,080 
1,328 


86,378 
11,145 


143,073 
39,635 


20,962 
203,697 


316,874 
8,491,328 


4,052,447 
10,603,575 


2,378 
109,694 


502 
288,184 


3,538 
143,500 


1,328 
1,019,135 


11,145 
205,285 


39,635 
984,144 


839,256 


15,313,240 


42,247,907 


293,874 


596,474 


311,957 


1,842,194 


527,922 


2,040,158 


112,680 

114,592 

57,587 


530,400 

195,675 

74,635 


8,483,423 

2,290,074 

967,209 


7,851 


8,100 

13,766 

3,537 


10,766 
154 


18,427 
14,322 


2,184 
4,597 


42,235 


284,859 
203,697 


800,710 
8,491,328 


11,740,706 
10,603,575 


7,851 
109,694 


25,403 
288,184 


10,920 
143,500 


32,749 
1,019,135 


6,781 
205,285 


42,235 
984,144 


203,697 
131,712 

217,116 
1,872 


8,491,328 
985,991 

4,919,673 
115,538 


10,603,575 

3,996,238 
2,747,525 

12,267,620 
892,243 


109,694 
50,000 

126,329 


288,184 
66,340 

216,047 
500 


143,500 
16,991 

137,969 
2,577 


1,019,135 

75,435 

714,282 
593 


205,285 
315,856 


984,144 
147,662 

866,117 


350,700 


6,021,202 


19,903,626 


176,329 


282,887 


157,537 


790,310 


315,856 


1,013,779 


. 839,256 

: 


15,313,240 


42,247,907 


293,874 


596,474 


311,957 


1,842,194 


527,922 


2,040,158 


320,055 
11,753 


3,467,571 
98,943 


16,082,873 
784,976 


102,611 
1,776 


138,699 
3,942 


86,764 
2,453 


666,247 
13.991 


172,588 
4,366 


607,098 
9,018 


331,808 

•- 


3,566,514 


16,867,849 


104,387 


142,641 


89,217 


680,238 


176,954 


616,116 


. 216,794 
- 
28,228 
44,506 
20,078 
25,711 


2,365,817 

533,451 

362,032 

94,394 

225,988 


11,711,669 

933,844 
1,060,273 
1,015,629 
1,073,600 


78,535 

5,533 
13,375 

6,264 


88,713 

20,559 

17,093 

2,928 

11,366 


61,427 

2,436 
11,138 

7,524 


546,237 

72,230 
44,358 

38,567 


103,340 

21,449 
23,942 

8,986 


444,856 

52,522 
55,464 

35,471 


1 335,317 


3,581,682 


15,795,015 


103,707 


140,659 


82,525 


701,392 


157,717 


588,313 


3,509 


15,168 


1,072,834 


680 


1,982 


6,692 


21,154 


19,237 


27,803 


2,503 


16,800 


83,124 


685 


884 


665 


3,872 


981 


3,672 



192 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financia 



Municipality 

Population 


Southamp- 
ton 
1,738 


S. Grimsby 
Twp. 
2,849 


South 
River 
952 


Springfield 
488 


Stayner 
1,841 


Stirling 
1,360 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


337,550 
83,952 


114,271 
32,179 


169,368 
54,132 


59,769 
20,588 


215,308 
49,616 


181,188 


Less accumulated depreciation 


58,54" 


Net fixed assets 


253,598 

34,458 

5,000 
1,967 


82,092 

8,298 

3,000 
411 


115,236 
8,297 

415 


39,181 
5,162 

500 

398 


165,692 
7,993 

5,566 


122,641 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


22,96f J 


-long term 

Accounts receivable (net) 

Other 


4 




41,425 
9,840 


11,709 


8,712 
14,077 


6,060 


13,559 
3,298 


23,39 ( i 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 








Total other assets 


9,840 
179,817 


68,463 


14,077 
14,743 


45,422 


3,298 
137,416 


1 32i 




112,91 






Total 


484,680 


162,264 


152,768 


90,663 


319,965 


260,27 


LIABILITIES 


8,147 
680 


3,250 
580 


69,000 
8,675 
1,802 


3,163 
329 


14,659 
1,358 


2 28 




5 51 




2^06 






Total liabilities 


8,827 
179,817 


3,830 
68,463 


79,477 
14,743 


3,492 
45,422 


16,017 
137,416 


9 87 


RESERVES 


112,91 ' 












179,817 
42,523 

253,513 


68,463 
15,000 

73,947 
1,024 


14,743 
21,000 

37,548 


45,422 
9,500 

32,249 


137,416 
9,557 

153,200 
3,775 


112,91 1 


CAPITAL 


20,71 






Accumulated net income invested in 
plant or held as working funds . . 


116,7? 






Total capital 


296,036 


89,971 


58,548 


41,749 


166,532 


137,4< 


Total 


484,680 


162,264 


152,768 


90,663 


319,965 


260,2: 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


139,518 
5,054 


53,106 
2,100 


60,963 
256 


19,601 
270 


86,461 
2,922 




Miscellaneous 


1,3! 


Total revenue 


144,572 


55,206 


61,219 


19,871 


89,383 


74 9: 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 

Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation • 

Other 


90,390 

20,536 
10,452 

10,306 


35,075 

5,591 
11,961 

3,907 


29,982 

4,088 
6,340 
7,710 
4,596 


12,506 

2,058 
1,271 

2,028 


64,636 

6,477 
7,712 

6,388 


i 


Total expense 


131,684 


56,534 


52,716 


17,863 


85,213 


70.5 


Net income net expense 


12,888 


1,328 


8,503 


2,008 


4,170 


4,4 






Number of customers 


1,328 


4H 


^7 


17Q 


77?. 


c 




I 



Statements A and B 
tatements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



193 



Stoney 
Creek 

7,572 


Stouffville 
3,906 


Stratford 
23,341 


Strathroy 
6,018 


Streetsville 
5,960 


Sturgeon 
Falls 
6,300 


Sudbury 
86,291 


Sunderland 
657 


Sundridge 
720 


591,422 
• 179,136 


470,494 
109,872 


4,999,551 
935,090 


839,572 
295,966 


570,999 
140,683 


580,460 
159,684 


9,810,214 
2,958,424 


69,029 
20,901 


95,010 
21,994 


412,286 

19,000 
75,000 

9,705 
4,305 


360,622 

20,493 
37,000 

13,194 


4,064,461 
190,299 

119,051 
5,680 


543,606 
29,696 

8,779 
1,542 


430,316 

31,224 
130,000 

12,956 
1,059 


420,776 
14,010 

11,289 

422 


6,851,790 
51,829 

599,625 

552,862 
8,386 


48,128 

13,707 

2,000 
1,059 


73,016 

9,004 

18,859 
5,854 


1 108,010 


70,687 

657 

12,379 


315,030 

198,243 

76,050 


40,017 

2,287 

23,216 


175,239 
397 


25,721 
8,169 


1,212,702 

180,467 

89,330 


16,766 


33,717 

299 

1,982 


! 271,946 


13,036 
230,327 


274,293 
2,989,643 


25,503 
568,060 


397 
252,850 


8,169 
171,345 


269,797 
3,623,073 


59,269 


2,281 
33,508 


792,242 


674,672 


7,643,427 


1,177,186 


858,802 


626,011 


11,957,362 


124,163 


142,522 


10,000 
2,211 
7,192 


42,833 

23,617 

9,612 


1,758,000 
147,860 

24,925 


109,000 
32,565 
20,077 


60,390 

29,558 

6,541 


116,140 
24,834 
14,885 


1,355,900 
457,842 
333,246 


2,949 
153 


9,959 

4,341 

371 


! 19,403 
271,946 


76,062 
230,327 


1,930,785 
2,989,643 


161,642 
568,060 


96,489 
252,850 


155,859 
171,345 


2,146,988 

3,623,073 
(743) 


3,102 
59,269 


14,671 
33,508 


271,946 
68,460 

424,148 
8,285 


230,327 
40,608 

320,755 
6,920 


2,989,643 
667,800 

1,917,084 
138,115 


568,060 
84,045 

363,439 


252,850 
93,262 

365,160 
51,041 


171,345 
73,860 

224,947 


3,622,330 
1,375,553 

4,812,491 


59,269 
4,628 

57,164 


33,508 
25,041 

69,302 


1500,893 


368,283 


2,722,999 


447,484 


509,463 


298,807 


6,188,044 


61,792 


94,343 


1792,242 


674,672 


7,643,427 


1,177,186 


858,802 


626,011 


11,957,362 


124,163 


142,522 


J335.250 
18,747 



1353,997 


217,463 
14,750 


1,926,657 
63,957 


393,262 
2,528 


314,725 
12,604 


273,569 
8,303 


3,741,249 
310,774 


34,942 
1,651 


46,989 
917 


232,213 


1,990,614 


395,790 


327,329 


281,872 


4,052,023 


36,593 


47,906 


1235,641 

• 14,783 
j 37,390 
' 5,321 
I 23,981 


152,909 

8,713 
19,593 

5,411 
15,256 


1,216,432 

204,604 
168,560 
154,712 
131,589 


253,568 

45,614 

43,425 

9,687 

23,310 


234,442 

13,521 
21,585 
10,176 
17,709 


170,582 

26,842 
32,453 
16,415 
20,836 


2,498,000 

450,831 
547,134 
145,039 
356,343 


27,419 

761 
2,519 

2,957 


30,769 

2,425 
4,582 
2,808 
2,502 


^317,116 


201,882 


1,875,897 


375,604 


297,433 


267,128 


3,997,347 


33,656 


43,086 


36,881 


30,331 


114,717 


20,186 


29,896 


14,744 


54,676 


2,937 


4,820 


2,187 


1,349 


7,801 


2,195 


1,610 


1,820 


26,540 


281 


336 



194 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financia 



Municipality 

Population 


Sutton 
1,564 


Taia 

586 


Tavistock 
1,323 


Tecum seh 
4,905 


Teeswater 
926 


Terrace 

Bay Twp. 

1,829 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


232,691 
36,704 


74,491 
17,817 


211,989 

78,741 


434,757 
149,002 


126,945 
31,956 


298,352 


Less accumulated depreciation 


86,846 




195,987 

17,938 

17,500 
6,334 


56,674 

4,358 

8,000 

1,453 

600 


133,248 

9,282 
15,000 

538 


285,755 
32,013 

29,508 


94,989 

12,320 

15,500 
673 


211,506 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investments-short term 


15,486 
40,000 


—long term 




Accounts receivable (net) 

Other 


922 
493 




41,772 

474 

14,562 


14,411 

1,261 

805 


24,820 
329 


61,521 

19,353 

3,129 


28,493 
117 


56,901 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 










15,036 
166,445 


2,066 
65,431 


329 
219,048 


22,482 
223,491 


117 
104,363 


_ 




147,069 






Total 


419,240 


138,582 


377,445 


593,249 


227,962 


415,476 






LIABILITIES 


11,051 
5,439 


5,832 
346 


7,437 
7,519 


53,400 

30,654 

2,722 


4,843 
193 


7,80( 




17' 


Other liabilities 


_l 








16,490 
166,445 


6,178 
65,431 


14,956 
219,048 


86,776 
223,491 


5,036 
104,363 


7,97' 


RESERVES 


147,06' 




"'] 








166,445 
26,000 

182,508 
27,797 


65,431 
14,264 

52,709 


219,048 
27,848 

115,593 


223,491 
27,600 

247,864 
7,518 


104,363 
21,296 

97,267 


147,06' 


CAPITAL 


70,20 


Sinking fund debentures 


- 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


189,25 
93 




Total capital 


236,305 


66,973 


143,441 


282,982 


118,563 


260,43 


Total 


419,240 


138,582 


377,445 


593,249 


227,962 


415,41 




B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 


132,396 
3,081 


49,933 
1,310 


75,141 
4,689 


208,046 
9,276 


67,998 
834 


94,37 

5,51 


: 


Miscellaneous 






135,477 


51,243 


79,830 


217,322 


68,832 


99,8* 








EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


88,610 

6,984 
17,573 

6,205 


38,681 

3,756 
1,521 

2,640 


59,417 

5,978 
5,965 
2,258 
7,391 


132,037 

29,276 

28,367 

5,532 

12,266 


46,555 

2,352 
3,822 

3,992 


72,8' 

7,7' 
9,81 
4,3 
8,3. 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 




Total expense 


119,372 


46,598 


81,009 


207,478 


56,721 


103,1 




Net income net expense 


16,105 


4,645 


1,179 


9,844 


12,111 


3,2 




Number of customers 


976 


273 


541 


1.476 


392 


4 











Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 






195 


Thamesford 
1,468 


Thamesville 
1,056 


Thedford 
111 


Thessalon 
1,625 


Thombury 
1,151 


Thorndale 
414 


Thornton 
315 


Thorold 
8,842 


Tilbury 
3,449 


179,326 
53,346 


175,007 
61,584 


93,743 
23,600 


223,483 
51,647 


188,660 

31,222 


50,060 
23,453 


29,222 
11,862 


990,862 

257,274 


441,893 
139,910 


125,980 

16,357 

10,000 
71 


113,423 

3,588 

5,009 

3,911 

767 


70,143 

1,009 

8,000 
1,275 


171,836 

20,626 
15,000 

1,337 


157,438 
6,066 

14,353 
1,007 


26,607 

14,723 

3,000 
520 
735 


17,360 
4,031 

683 


733,588 

7,919 
270,804 

35,223 
601 


301,983 
6,340 

8,428 


26,428 
30 
69 


13,275 
321 
306 


10,284 
29 


36,963 

260 

4,884 


21,426 
4,533 
5,142 


18,978 
735 


4,714 


314,547 

39,202 

824 


14,768 
1,464 

475 


99 
112,200 


627 
119,844 


29 
72,630 


5,144 
41,027 


9,675 
73,910 


735 
42,280 


21 128 


40,026 
1,267,373 


1,939 
326,036 


264,707 


247,169 


153,086 


254,970 


262,449 


88,600 


43,202 


2,355,534 


644,726 


600 

7,360 
2,962 


7,200 
4,771 
1,143 


2,736 
278 


29,000 

15,142 

2,115 


8,400 

7,583 

329 


3,366 
232 


1,033 
60 


41,620 
35,522 
10,058 


13,000 
25,486 
45,587 


10,922 
112,200 


13,114 
119,844 


3,014 
72,630 


46,257 
41,027 


16,312 
73,910 


3,598 
42,280 


1,093 
21,128 


87,200 
1,267,373 


84,073 
326,036 


112,200 
7,758 

130,807 
3,020 


119,844 
11,988 

96,443 
5,780 


72,630 
16,500 

60,386 
556 


41,027 
36,000 

131,686 


73,910 
77,600 

94,627 


42,280 
3,086 

39,636 


21,128 
7,200 

13,781 


1,267,373 
85,982 

875,181 
39,798 


326,036 
51,000 

178,526 
5,091 


141,585 


114,211 


77,442 


167,686 


172,227 


42,722 


20,981 


1,000,961 


234,617 


264,707 


247,169 


153,086 


254,970 


262,449 


88,600 


43,202 


2,355,534 


644,726 


85,785 
5,297 


67,739 
2,154 


40,088 
1,109 


99,777 
2,698 


95,318 
2,161 


20,392 
1,514 


10,177 


486,641 
23,723 


197,745 
5,878 


91,082 


69,893 


41,197 


102,475 


97,479 


21,906 


10,177 


510,364 


203,623 


', 62,792 

3,496 

6,994 

226 

7,348 


48,162 

5,905 
9,457 
1,194 
5,756 


28,490 

5,054 
3,447 

3,093 


51,930 

8,055 

14,090 

4,944 

5,845 


62,365 

10,423 

10,277 

2,284 

6,101 


11,939 

2,511 
2,349 

2,259 


7,247 

367 
960 

1,022 


270,516 

59,344 

56,319 

9,395 

26,970 


131,463 

25,047 

24,925 

4,636 

11,770 


80,856 


70,474 


40,084 


84,864 


91,450 


19,058 


9,596 


422,544 


197,841 


10,226 


581 


1,113 


17,611 


6,029 


2,848 


581 


87,820 


5,782 


463 


450 


309 


581 


596 


156 


109 


2,646 


1,336 



196 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Municipality 

Population 


Tillsonburg 
6,550 


Toronto 
671,699 


Tottenham 
909 


Trenton 
13,950 


Tweed 
1,670 


Uxbridge 
2,685 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 


1,097,967 
266,308 


127,224,965 
40,699,685 


75,359 
24,311 


2,133,385 
692,036 


217,283 
71,489 


339,074 
90,216 


Less accumulated depreciation 




831,659 

40,246 
150,000 

10,779 


86,525,280 

265,721 
8,700,000 

814,487 

6,191,726 

62,751 


51,048 

4,611 

2,000 
2,680 


1,441,349 

87,148 

10,000 
53,508 


145,794 

13,184 

11,000 
1,162 


248,858 

27,538 

20,000 

2,923 

12,931 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

In vestments— short term 




Accounts receivable (net) 

Other 




201,025 
34,489 

1,732 


16,034,685 

2,382,495 
3,280,274 
7,415,156 


9,291 
222 
241 


150,656 

72,627 

632 


25,346 


63,392 

337 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 


Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 




Total other assets 


36,221 
655,645 


13,077,925 
114,031,638 


463 
69,227 


73,259 
1,578,917 


144,916 


337 
224,735 


Equity in Ontario Hydro 




Total 


1,724,550 


229,669,528 


130,029 


3,244,181 


316,056 


537,322 • 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 


23,400 
56,501 
22,740 


10,526,050 
5,659,085 
1,333,000 


2,566 
655 


99,000 
86,581 
16,245 


8,791 
683 


71.40C I 

22,75C 
3,571 


Current liabilities 


Other liabilities 




Total liabilities 


102,641 
655,645 


17,518,135 

114,031,638 
305,000 


3,221 
69,227 


201,826 
1,578,917 


9,474 
144,916 


97,721 
224,73.'- 


RESERVES 

Equity in Ontario Hydro 


Other reserves 




Total reserves 


655,645 
182,543 

777,652 
6,069 


114,336,638 

35,007,301 
3,280,274 

56,591,964 
2,935,216 


69,227 
21,435 

36,146 


1,578,917 
215,587 

1,130,338 
117,513 


144,916 
19,000 

142,666 


224,73.'' ! 
18,88< 

195,98i 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


Sinking fund debentures 

Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


Total capital 


966,264 


97,814,755 


57,581 


1,463,438 


161,666 


214,86' 




Total 


1,724,550 


229,669,528 


130,029 


3,244,181 


316,056 


537,32 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


481,280 
22,931 


54,667,265 
1,781,792 


31,283 
1,720 


990,616 
43,417 


97,155 
4,519 


is 


Miscellaneous 


Total revenue 


504,211 


56,449,057 


33,003 


1,034,033 


101,674 


201,32 




EXPENSE 

Power purchased 

Local generation 


325,104 

48,184 

45,665 

9,020 

30,062 


35,940,541 

6,664,017 
6,081,604 
1,183,276 
3,340,374 


22,894 

2,610 

5,435 

2,542 


789,900 

49,962 
76,351 
19,160 
75,591 


77,964 

5,604 
6,646 

8,161 


7,83 
18,45 

6,33 
11,17 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 


Financial 

Depreciation 


Other 


Total expense 


458,035 


53,209,812 


33,481 


1,010,964 


98,375 


179,4! 


Net income net expense 


46,176 


3,239,245 


478 


23,069 


3,299 


21,9! 




Number of customers 


2 708 


9^1 OQ9 1T\ 


4,869 


687 


1,0.' 







Statements A and B 

itatements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 






197 


/ankleek 

HUl 

1,684 


Vaughan 
Twp. 
18,436 


Victoria 

Harbour 

1,076 


Walker ton 
4,248 


Wallaceburg 
10,854 


Wardsville 
336 


Warkworth 
560 


Wasaga 
Beach 
1,235 


Waterdown 
2,143 


177,572 
66,636 


3,274,308 
806,466 


\ 

123,998 
28,536 


487,847 
130,718 


1,474,501 
542,136 


50,676 
14,441 


73,151 
23,792 


251,084 
86,090 


244,769 
72,240 


! 110,936 

5,110 

30,000 
31 


2,467,842 
82,719 

581,302 
174 


95,462 
394 

10,976 


357,129 

23,336 

6,000 
12,870 


932,365 

325 

51,074 


36,235 

2,853 

1,500 
190 


49,359 
6,021 

154 


164,994 
18,687 

2,316 


172,529 
9,409 

4,448 


• 35,141 
2,695 


664,195 

47,871 

120,528 


11,370 

1,021 

98 


42,206 
14,993 


51,399 

69,712 

2,318 


4,543 


6,175 


21,003 

71 

2,864 


13,857 
642 


• 2,695 
45,205 


168,399 


1,119 
51,347 


14,993 
356,141 


72,030 
1,546,260 


29,056 


39,210 


2,935 
54,295 


642 
138,985 


(93,977 


3,300,436 


159,298 


770,469 


2,602,054 


69,834 


94,744 


243,227 


326,013 


15,500 

10,110 


2,750,000 
645,957 
114,198 


2,300 

27,853 
230 


22,774 
5,064 


75,000 

130,867 

29,663 


1,538 
139 


4,957 

1,795 

279 


14,000 

4,972 

221 


11,000 

8,217 

890 


|25,610 
J45.205 


3,510,155 


30,383 
51,347 


27,838 
356,141 


235,530 
1,546,260 


1,677 
29,056 


7,031 
39,210 


19,193 
54,295 


20,107 
138,985 


"45,205 
;30,500 

92,662 


(209,719) 


51,347 
16,579 

60,189 
800 


356,141 
56,749 

329,741 


1,546,260 

71,537 

748,727 


29,056 
7,563 

28,548 
2,990 


39,210 
9,816 

33,204 
5,483 


54,295 
96,000 

73,068 
671 


138,985 
26,632 

129,103 
11,186 


13,162 


(209,719) 


77,568 


386,490 


820,264 


39,101 


48,503 


169,739 


166,921 


93,977 


3,300,436 


159,298 


770,469 


2,602,054 


69,834 


94,744 


243,227 


326,013 


>4,875 
4,188 


1,411,382 
39,369 


52,009 
126 


275,659 
9,302 


1,075,424 

5,545 


16,503 
469 


26,953 
914 


89,946 
2,883 


102,771 
3,356 


.9,063 


1,450,751 


52,135 


284,961 


1,080,969 


16,972 


27,867 


92,829 


106,127 


4,486 

3,907 

6,610 
3.506 
7,169 


1,107,681 

46,431 
136,043 
247,213 
123,103 


34,634 

3,222 
6,190 
2,039 

3,322 


217,898. 

16,983 
21,573 

17,805 


876,667 

62,737 

95,655 

5,840 

44,349 


10,072 

2,501 
1,164 

1,686 


18,036 

1,460 

3,484 

642 

2,850 


53,435 

7,767 

16,353 

3,408 

7,143 


71,328 

9,322 
9,297 
2,949 
9,261 


-5.678 


1,660,471 


49,407 


274,259 


1,085,248 


15,423 


26,472 


88,106 


102,157 


6.6/5 


(209,720) 


2,728 


10,702 


4,279 


1,549 


1,395 


4,723 


3,970 


. 594 


5,692 


578 


1,531 


3,682 


170 


251 


941 


639 



198 



Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financial 



Municipality 

Population 


Waterford 
2,460 


Waterloo 

32,527 


Watford 
1,261 


Waubau- 
shene 
1,500 


Webbwood 
610 


Welland 
40,315 


A. BALANCE SHEET 
FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


233,512 
60,011 


5,434,029 
1,109,608 


143,920 
51,075 


80,466 
19,590 


52,950 
13,646 


4,873 044 


Less accumulated depreciation 


1,536,274 


Net fixed assets 


173,501 

34,457 
20,000 

824 
165 


4,324,421 

160,000 

289,548 
1,658 


92,845 

2,576 

26,000 

7,078 

6,039 

90 


60,876 
733 

2,896 

3 


39,304 

7,924 

2,500 

2,500 

914 


3,336,770 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 

Investments-short term 


130,000 
150,000 


-long term 


60 503 


Other 


1,111 




55,446 
415 


451,206 

193,404 

30,480 


41,783 
898 


3,632 
270 


13,838 

271 

3,677 


341,614 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 


94,612 


Sinking fund on debentures 

Miscellaneous assets 


15,820 






Total other assets 


415 
190,878 


223,884 
2,249,449 


898 
189,993 


270 
43,642 


3,948 
9,798 


110,432 


Equity in Ontario Hydro 


2,953,305 






Total 


420,240 


7,248,960 


325,519 


108,420 


66,888 


6,742,121 


LIABILITIES 

Debentures outstanding 

Current liabilities 


21,300 

10,629 

3,250 


1,534,000 

237,557 

74,835 


8,018 
868 


2,193 
36 


12,861 

2,025 

595 


1.101.50C 
213,14C 


Other liabilities 


17,842 






Total liabilities 


35,179 
190,878 


1,846,392 
2,249,449 


8,886 
189,993 


2,229 
43,642 


15,481 
9,798 


1,332,482 


RESERVES 


2,953,30f 


Other reserves 




Total reserves 


190,878 

20,823 

168,929 
4,431 


2,249,449 
985,262 

1,794,629 
373,228 


189,993 
9,056 

117,584 


43,642 
3,242 

59,307 


9,798 
17,139 

24,470 


2,953,30! 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 

Sinking fund debentures 


777,35 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds . . 
Contributed capital 


1,624,23: 

54,75 


Total capital 


194,183 


3,153,119 


126,640 


62,549 


41,609 


2,456,33 


Total 


420,240 


7,248,960 


325,519 


108,420 


66,888 


6,742,12 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 
REVENUE 


132,557 
3,360 


2,666,627 
39,527 


109,309 
2,938 


31,215 
1,173 


19,768 
651 


2,390,7C 


Miscellaneous 


41,53 




135,917 


2,706,154 


112,247 


32,388 


20,419 


2,432,23 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


83,847 

20,194 

11,062 

2,845 

6,106 


1,708,231 

160,419 
204,330 
198,239 
136,878 


80,943 

5,579 
14,391 

4,147 


21,910 

6,872 
2,796 

2,347 


10,546 

2,051 
2,769 
2,621 
1,539 


1,646,76 


Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 


165,7: 

207,5: 

134,3? 
139,76 


Other 




Total expense 


124,054 


2,408,097 


105,060 


33,925 


19,526 


2,294,1' 


Net income net expense 


11,863 


298,057 


7,187 


1,537 


893 


138,0: 






Number of customers 


889 


8.617 


575 


476 


155 


12,0 







Statements A and B 

Statements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



199 



Wellesley 
793 


Wellington 
874 


West Lome 
980 


Westport 
601 


Wheatley 
1,595 


Whitby 
23,562 


Wiarton 
1,970 


Williams- 
burg 

322 


Winchester 
1,468 


90,457 
19,497 


104,698 
42,927 


153,055 
65,400 


62,431 
13,054 


243,990 
56,973 


3,343,479 
809,728 


242,040 
72,386 


31,906 
14,804 


159,684 
53,391 


70,960 

2,436 

9,000 
094 


61,771 

15,808 

17,000 
30 
18 


87,655 

16,863 

20,000 

30,000 

3,497 

100 


49,377 

11,378 

3,500 
67 
45 


187,017 

5,227 
15,000 

1,186 


2,533,751 
12,908 

49,601 


169,654 

19,214 

15,000 
2,792 


17,102 

14,272 

5,000 
276 


106,293 
38,761 

1,092 

1,265 


11,530 


32,856 
650 


70,460 

47 

3,542 


14,990 


21,413 

1,177 

369 


62,509 
77,010 
10,198 


37,006 
6,417 


19,548 


41,118 
2,086 


73,570 


650 
96,308 


3,589 
171,539 


55,259 


1,546 
127,356 


87,208 
1,011,147 


6,417 
181,017 


41,089 


2,086 
170,117 


156,060 


191,585 


333,243 


119,626 


337,332 


3,694,615 


394,094 


77,739 


319,614 


1,000 

3,169 

390 


3,022 
724 


5,760 
302 


2,558 
433 


5,116 
828 


167,000 

1,176,040 

35,799 


8,086 
142 


1,372 
444 


8,965 
144 


4,559 
73,570 

- 


3,746 
96,308 


6,062 
171,539 


2,991 
55,259 


5,944 
127,356 


1,378,839 
1,011,147 


8,228 
181,017 


1,816 
41,089 


9,109 
170,117 


73,570 
11,428 

65,348 
1,155 


96,308 
13,816 

68,223 
9,492 


171,539 
8,000 

147,642 


55,259 
15,000 

46,299 
77 


127,356 
52,000 

150,482 
1,550 


1,011,147 
368,693 

911,984 

23,952 


181,017 
37,400 

167,449 


41,089 
2,750 

32,084 


170,117 
29,162 

111,226 


77,931 


91,531 


155,642 


61,376 


204,032 


1,304,629 


204,849 


34,834 


140,388 


i 156,060 


191,585 


333,243 


119,626 


337,332 


3,694,615 


394,094 


77,739 


319,614 


38,914 

> >■>■> 


44,238 
2,728 


86,635 
8,134 


32,274 
726 


79,237 
1,601 


1,277,621 
55,308 


115,152 
6,010 


17,075 
348 


114,845 
960 


| 40,025 


46,966 


94,769 


33,000 


80,838 


1,332,929 


121,162 


17,423 


115,805 


28,691 

2,954 

3,720 

497 

, 2,840 


31,904 

3,883 
4,154 

4,257 


62,114 

5,987 
12,264 

5,936 


23,357 

1,000 
4,037 

1,674 


48,800 

5,951 
9,777 
2,708 
6,702 


941,110 

94,066 
107,561 

80,455 
107,369 


80,040 

13,181 
9,768 

9,351 


11,897 

676 
1,669 

1,182 


96,550 

3,249 
9,471 

5,093 


, 38,702 


44,198 


86,301 


30,068 


73,938 


1,330,561 


112,340 


15,424 


114,363 


1,323 


2,768 


8,468 


2,932 


6,900 


2,368 


8,822 


1,999 


1,442 


315 


487 


468 


303 


582 


6,756 


857 


146 


595 



200 


Municipal Electrical Service 

Municipal Electrical Utilities Financi 


Municipality 

Population 


Windermere 
111 


Windsor 
193,004 


Wingham 
2,865 


Woodbridge 
2,411 


Woodstock 
24,626 


Woodville 

421 


A. BALANCE SHEET 

FIXED ASSETS 

Plant and facilities at cost 


46,487 
11,862 


25,015,321 
8,122,760 


464,770 
180,501 


221,104 
99,095 


3,809,502 
1,178,446 


58,27' 


Less accumulated depreciation 


15,06' 




34,625 

5,567 

5,000 
562 


16,892,561 

2,635 

1,305,166 

1,237,279 

15,009 


284,269 

21,445 

59,648 
4,219 
1,109 


122,009 

27,716 

75,000 

24,775 

2,590 

2,375 


2,631,056 
146,337 

19,180 
2,959 


43,21. 


CURRENT ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in bank 


1,72 


—long term 


6,00' 


Accounts receivable (net) 

Other 


1,31 


Total current assets 


11,129 


2,560,089 

483,045 

85,704 


86,421 
12,951 

2,797 


132,456 
18,996 


168,476 
124,207 


9,03 


OTHER ASSETS 

Inventories 

Sinking fund on debentures 










23,671 


568,749 
18,912,848 


15,748 
349,103 


18,996 
285,914 


124,207 
2,814,642 




Equity in Ontario Hydro 


39,65 






Total 


69,425 


38,934,247 


735,541 


559,375 


5,738,381 


91,90 


LIABILITIES 


821 


1,132,580 

1,340,657 

647,470 


15,329 
4,011 


1,914 
6,708 


149,005 
41,785 




Current liabilities 


1,47 


Other liabilities 




Total liabilities 


821 
23,671 


3,120,707 

18,912,848 
208,981 


19,340 
349,103 


8,622 
285,914 


190,790 
2,814,642 


1,50 
39,65 


RESERVES 


Other reserves 






Total reserves 


23,671 
11,238 

33,695 


19,121,829 
3,805,827 

12,806,183 
79,701 


349,103 
81,155 

285,943 


285,914 
23,835 

238,520 
2,484 


2,814,642 
429,776 

2,198,878 
104,295 


39,65 1 

5,24 


CAPITAL 

Debentures redeemed 


Sinking fund debentures 


Accumulated net income invested in 

plant or held as working funds 

Contributed capital 


45,49 






Total capital 


44,933 


16,691,711 


367,098 


264,839 


2,732,949 


50,74 


Total 


69,425 


38,934,247 


735,541 


559,375 


5,738,381 


91,90 


B. OPERATING STATEMENT 

REVENUE 

Sale of electrical energy 


13,746 
479 


11,713,264 
163,689 


203,726 
9,322 


138,756 
11,256 


1,908,690 
50,368 


18.6C 


Miscellaneous 


96 


Total revenue 


14,225 


11,876,953 


213,048 


150,012 


1,959,058 


19,57 






EXPENSE 

Power purchased 


8,452 

937 
880 

1,428 


7,913,093 

1,271,806 

1,004,118 

237,930 

685,203 


154,098 

15,849 
18,282 

14,138 


110,664 

4,660 
17,507 

10,468 


1,430,472 

141,856 

123,609 

536 

119,006 


12,42 


Local generation 




Operation and maintenance 

Administration 

Financial 

Depreciation 

Other 


2,44 
1,86 

2,14 


Total expense , 


11,697 


11,112,150 


202,367 


143,299 


1,815,479 


18,86 


Net income net expense 


2,528 


764,803 


10,681 


6,713 


143,579 


7( 


Number of customers 


140 


£0 1*1 


1 181 


sin 


8 9*8 


H 




1 



Statements A and B 

itements for the Year Ended December 31, 1968 



201 













yoming 
1,048 


York 
139,052 


Zurich 
728 


Summary 
All Regions 




119,643 
40,035 


12,992,533 
4,383,197 


92,763 
15,242 


759,163,167 
200,212,484 




79,608 

2,529 

9,295 

312 

38 


8,609,336 

242,980 
900,000 
704,000 
573,909 
6,257 


77,521 
17,954 

453 


558,950,683 

11,554,954 
27,957,092 

8,252,468 
27,549,947 

1,488,012 




i 12,174 
238 


2,427,146 

174,292 

77,266 

365,406 


18,407 


76,802,473 

15,883,122 
11,969,393 
11,696,011 




238 
63,178 


616,964 
8,997,645 


75,734 


39,548,526 
464,803,659 




.55,198 


20,651,091 


171,662 


1,140,105,341 




9,526 
511 


103,413 
727,948 
548,194 


3,072 
333 


108,216,271 
40,797,753 
13,611,744 




' 10,037 
j 63,178 


1,379,555 
8,997,645 


3,405 
75,734 


162,625,768 

464,803,659 
1,338,735 




63,178 

. 9,700 

■ 71,552 
731 


8,997,645 

688,123 
77,266 

9,461,169 

47,333 


75,734 
5,592 

86,931 


466,142,394 

116,735,092 
11,969,393 

355,282,175 
27,350,519 




: 81,983 


10,273,891 


92,523 


511,337,179 




55,198 


20,651,091 


171,662 


1,140,105,341 




,55,052 
1,492 


5,839,458 
414,452 


46,325 
1,003 


355,980,197 
10,952,677 




56,544 


6,253,910 


47,328 


366,932,874 




•40,551 

3,018 
I 3.536 

3,969 


4,336,660 

334,095 

759,204 

24,285 

463,182 


27,229 

4,934 
6,217 

2,346 


252,555,717 
749,020 
28,713,279 
29,316,059 
13,359,494 
22,018,755 
67,422 




'51,074 


5,917,426 


40,726 


346,779,746 




5,470 


336,484 


6,602 


20,153,128 




431 


45,866 


327 


1,709,111 





202 Municipal Electrical Service 

STATEMENT C 



Statement C is the schedule of retail rates for service by the municipal 
distribution systems receiving power from the Commission. Accounts are 
calculated either at net rates (marked N in the schedule) or are subject to a 
prompt-payment discount, for the most part at 10 per cent. 



Rates Schedules in Effect 

Under normal or standard residential service, charges are calculated on 
specified blocks of kilowatt-hours per month at designated rates for each block. 
The account rendered is subject to a minimum monthly charge. For comparative 
purposes net monthly bills are shown for metered energy consumptions of 250, 
500, and 750 kilowatt-hours, subject to the qualifications in the following para- 
graph. 

Water-heating service may be provided either at a special flat-rate monthly 
charge, or through the regular metered service. The net monthly bills are calcu- 
lated in Statement C at metered rates. A "w" opposite the rate of the third 
block of 500 kilowatt-hours for certain municipalities indicates that that block is 
available only to customers with an approved water heater supplied through the 
regular service meter. In these municipalities flat-rate service for water heating 
is not generally available to new applicants for residential service. House-heating 
energy may be segregated from the standard service and billed at a separate 
house-heating rate, or, as indicated in the table, it may be optionally included 
with the normal household service and billed at the regular residential rate. 
Where a low all-electric rate is in effect, house-heating energy would, of course, 
be included with the water-heating and basic household energy, the entire service 
being billed at this special rate. 

Commercial rates are applicable to all electrical service supplied to stores, 
offices, churches, schools, public buildings, institutions, hospitals, hotels, restau- 
rants, service stations, and other premises used for commercial purposes. The 
commercial rates are also used for billing sign and display lighting. In many 
municipalities, commercial-type customers having connected loads of under five 
kilowatts are billed at residential rates. Rates for industrial power service to 
customers of the municipal systems provide for 24-hour unrestricted delivery at 
secondary distribution voltage. These rates, however, are not applicable to the 
Commission's direct industrial customers. 

Commercial and industrial power service bills are based on a monthly demand 
rate (with a minimum for commercial service) applied to the customer's billing 
demand, plus energy charges for specified blocks of kilowatt-hours used, the size 
of the blocks varying in according with the customer's billing demand. All 
additional energy is billed at the end rate per kilowatt-hour. 



Statement C 203 

The general rate introduced in 1966 applies both to commercial and to power 
service customers. The use of a descending block-energy rate, supplemented in 
its application to larger loads by a demand charge per kilowatt, permits flexibility 
in design, and enables customers to take advantage of the benefits of scale by using 
more energy at the lower block rates. At the same time, it results in a relatively 
smooth adjustment in charges over the whole range of customer loads. The intro- 
duction of the general rate, which is more readily understood by the customer, also 
contributes towards rate simplification by greatly reducing the number of rate 
classifications required. 

The net monthly bills shown for commercial and industrial power service are 
calculated on the basis of a demand of one kilowatt for a use per month of 200 
and 300 hours. The corresponding bill for a demand of 10 kilowatts would be ten 
times the amounts shown, for 20 kilowatts twenty times the amounts shown, and 
so on. 

STATEMENT D 

Statement D records revenue, consumption, number of customers, average 
consumption per customer, and average cost per kilowatt-hour for each of the 
three main classes of service in all the municipal systems served. The number of 
customers shown is the average of the numbers served at the end of the current 
and preceding years. The revenue and consumption from house heating and the 
use of flat-rate water heaters are included in the totals shown, the flat-rate water- 
heater kilowatt-hours being estimated on the basis of 16.8 hours' use per day. 

The average cost per kilowatt-hour is the average cost to the customer, that 
is the average revenue per kilowatt-hour received by the utility. Such a statistical 
average does not represent the utility's actual cost of delivering one kilowatt-hour. 
However, a comparison of this average over a number of years is some indication 
of the trend of cost in any one municipality, and the trend in all municipal systems 
combined may be seen in the table on page 146 and the graphs on page 147. 
Other things being equal, the average cost per kilowatt-hour would rise with an 
increase in rates. The normal trend, however, is for consumption per customer 
to increase, and residential customers in particular are using an ever-widening 
variety of electrical appliances, including fast-recovery water heaters. This increased 
use, since it is billed at the lower rates usually applicable to higher-consumption 
blocks of kilowatt-hours, is frequently reflected in a lower average cost per 
kilowatt-hour. 

For industrial power service customers, the relationship between demand 
(kilowatts required) and energy (kilowatt-hours of use) is an important factor in 
establishing the customer's average cost per kilowatt-hour. The use of the demand 
for only a few hours will result in a relatively small total bill but a high average 
cost per kilowatt-hour; the use of the same demand for several hours will increase 
the total bill but substantially reduce the average cost per kilowatt-hour. In other 
words, the average cost per kilowatt-hour varies inversely with the customer's 
load factor. 



204 



Municipal Electrical Service 



RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS FOR 

in Effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
(unless otherwise noted) and 



S •- 



s > * 

£o 3 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



•3 2 

3C CO 
8 W 



All-Electric 

Rate 

per Kwh 



.bo 

b 10 



.A * 

"O —i 

3-5 



is 



x> -5 

3 

z 



Rate per Kwh 
for 



M 

o 
O 

51 

IS 

b o 



X O 
Z rs 



X o 

z£ 



si 



§ s 

so 



.1.2 



Net Monthly 
Bill for 



J5 


43 


o 


O 

o 


$ 


$ 


4.05 


6.07 


3.51 


5.31 


5.15 


7.65 


4.35 


6.10 


6.00 


8.75 


4.32 


6.34 


3.38 


5.63 


3.78 


5.58 


4.35 


6.10 


3.87 


5.67 


5.67 


7.24 


3.70 


5.70 


4.15 


5.90 


3.51 


5.31 


3.78 


5.58 


4.00 


5.75 


6.00 


8.00 


4.05 


5.85 


5.40 


7.20 


3.33 


5.13 


3.28 


5.53 


4.20 


5.95 


4.90 


7.40 


5.94 


7.74 


4.09 


5.89 


3.80 


6.30 


4.50 


6.25 


5.15 


8.15 


3.95 


5.70 


5.04 


6.61 


3.78 


5.35 


4.59 


6.39 


5.40 


7.42 


3.51 


5.08 


3.42 


4.99 


4.86 


6.66 


3.78 


5.58 


4.80 


6.55 


4.05 


6.07 


5.13 


6.93 


3.51 


5.31 


3.78 


5.58 


4.86 


6.66 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig , 

Ajax N 10% 

Alexandria N 5% 

Alfred 



Alliston 

Almonte 

Alvinston N 5% 

Amherstburg 

Ancaster Twp 



No 
41 
45 
37 
45 

42 

40 
35 
45 
38 



1.1 
3.0 



Small Commercial 



43 



Apple Hill N 5% 

Arkona N 5% 

Arnprior 

Arthur 

Athens N 5% 



Atikokan Twp. 

Aurora 

Avonmore . . 

Aylmer 

Ayr 



N5% 



45 

37 
42 

•#41 

44 
37 
40 
36 
44 



Baden N 5% 



fBala 

Bancroft 

Barrie 

Barry's Bay N 5% 



Bath 

Beachburg 

Beachville 

Beamsville 

f Beardmore 



N5% 



Beaverton 

Beeton 

Belle River 

Belleville 

Belmont N 5% 

Blenheim 

fBlind River 

Bloomfield 

Blyth 

Bobcaygeon 



42 

41 
46 

38 

#45 



1.2 


1.1 


1.1 


1.1 


□ 


_ 


□ 


_ 


D 


1.1 




1.1 


□ 


1.0 





- 


1.2 


1.1 


□ 


- 


□ 


- 


□ 


4.0 


1.1 


1.1 





4.0 





- 


1.1 


1.1 


□ 


- 



Small Commercial 
1.22 

1.1 
1.1 

0/zl.O 

Small Commercial 






1.0 





1.1 


□ 


- 





1.1 





3.4 


□ 


_ 





- 


□ 


1.1 





1.1 





1.0 


1.1 


_ 


1.22 


- 





- 


□ 


_ 





1.2 



1.2 





3.0 
2.6 

3.5 
3.5 
4,0 

3.2 

3.1 
2.8 
3.5 
3.0 
4.2 

3.0 
3.5 
2.6 

2.8 
2.8 

4.0 
3.0 
4.0 
2.6 

2.9 

2.8 
3.4 
4.4 
3.5 
4.0 
3.0 
3.5 

3.5 
4.0 
2.8 
3.4 
4.0 

2.6 
3.2 
3.6 
3.2 
4.0 

3.0 
3.8 
2.6 
2.8 
4.0 



i 

1.5 
1.3 
1.7 
1.3 
2.0 
1.6 



1.4 
1.3 
1.4 
2.1 

1.1 
1.2 
1.3 



2.0 
1.5 
2.0 
1.2 



1.4 
1.6 

2.2 
1.4 

1.5 
1.7 

1.1 
1.8 
1.4 

1.7 
2.0 

1.3 
1.1 
1.8 
1.3 
1.4 

1.5 
1.9 

1.3 
1.4 
1.7 



t 
0.9 

0.8 

w0.7 
0.9 



w0.8 

w0.7 

0.8 

w0.7 

w0.8 
w0.7 

0.8 
w0.7 

w0.8 
0.8 

w0.8 
0.8 



w0.7 



w0.8 
w0.8 



w0.7 



w0.7 
w0.7 
0.7 
w0.8 
w0.9 

0.7 
w0.7 
w0.8 
w0.8 
w0.7 



wO.J 
0.{ 
O.t 

wO.i 



t 
1.2 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 
1.3 

1.0 
1.1 
1.0 
1.1 
1.1 

1.0 
1.0 
0.8 
1.1 
1.0 

1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 

1.0 

1.0 

1.2 

1.1 

1.11 

1.0 

1.2 

1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 

1.2 

1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 

0.9 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.2 



$ 
1.11 
1.39 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.11 

1.11 
1.40 
1.75 
1.67 

2.22 

1.50 
1.75 
1.39 
1.11 
1.50 

2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
1.67 
1.11 

2.00 
2.50 
3.33 
1.75 
2.00 
1.75 
1.75 

1.75 
2.22 
1.67 
1.75 
2.22 

1.39 
1.67 
2.22 
1.95 
2.00 

1.11 
1.39 
1.11 
1.11 

2.22 



Statement C 



205 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1968 



are subject 


to 10% 


prompt payment discount 














i a minimum 


monthly charge 


















COMMERCIAL SERVICE 


INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 




15 


Demand Rate 














M 


per Kilowatt 
50 Cents 


Net Monthly 


£ 


Energy Rate per Kwh 


NetMc 


nthly 


c 


Bill for 


X 


for Use of 


Bill for U 


cial Cooki 
rKwh 


8.^ 


Minimum 50 Cents 


Use of 1 Kw 
of Demand 


4> 

■3 


Each Kw of Demand 


of 1 
of Der 


Kw 


Energy Rate per 


land 


60 O 

c ^ 


Kwh for Use of 






rt 
















5 « 


Each Kw of Demand 






Pi 












c ^ 


w ■ — 








•a 


First 


Second 














ga 






§ 


Block 


Block 


2 






1 


t« 


n 


3 


«5 


OS 


B 






3 


n 


V) 


o 
U 


WO 


5 

o 


H 

3 
O 


.A o 


3 
O 


3 
O 


o 

O 








3 
O 


3 
O 




- K 


4-K 


<*a 


X 


IS 




Hours'. Use 


Hours' Use 


3 -a 


X 


X 






£8 




9 1 


o 
o 


o 
o 

CO 




50 100 


50 100 


2 c 

5* 


o 
o 


o 
o 




t 


t 


t 


t 


$ 


$ 


$ 


t i 


t t 


* 


$ 


$ 




1.5 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 


2.1 


0.5 


0.33 


3.24 


3.54 


_ 


1.5 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 


1.6 


0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.09 


1 1.2 


1.35 


°2.3 


0.7 


0.45 


3.50 


3.95 


1.00 


1.5 


0.5 


0.35 


3.00 


3.35 




1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 








Genei 


al Rate (see n 


otes) 






- 1.3 


1.5 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


,1 - 


1.5 


2.6 


_ 


1.0 


3.69 


4.59 


1.20 


1.9 


1.3 


0.30 


2.79 


3.06 


< 1.1 


1.5 


°2.0 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.42 


1.00 


1.2 


0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.73 






General Rate (see notes) 








General Rate (see notes) 






1.1 


1.5 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


! W 


1.5 


°3.6 


0.8 


0.5 


4.41 


4.86 


1.00 


2.7 


0.5 


0.33 


3.78 


4.08 


j 




General Rate (see 


notes) 








Gener 


al Rate (see n 


otes) 










General Rate (see notes) 








General Rate (see notes) 






! i.o 


1.5 


°2.1 1 0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 


1.6 i - 0.5 1 0.33 


2.79 


3.09 


i.i 


1.5 


°2.5 ' 0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


1.8 1 - 0.5 | 0.33 


2.97 


3.27 






General Rate (see notes) 








General Rate (see n 


otes) 






i 

!| 1.35 


1.35 


°3.3 


0.7 


0.45 


4.50 


4.95 


1.00 


2.2 


0.5 


0.30 


3.70 


4.00 


_ 


1.5 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.18 


I - 


1.5 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


u 


1.5 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.18 


1.5 


2.4 


- 


0.9 


3.42 


4.23 


1.20 


2.1 


1.4 


0.30 


2.92 


3.19 


" 


1.35 


2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.50 


4.00 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.35 


3.20 


3.55 


1.6 


1.5 


4.2 


0.8 


0.5 


4.95 


5.40 


1.00 


2.7 


0.5 


0.33 


3.78 


4.08 


1.1 


1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


1.9 


0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


1.11 


1.5 


2.0 


- 


0.8 


2.97 


3.69 




General Rate (see notes) 






- 


1.35 


2.0 
General I 


0.7 
late (see 


0.45 
notes) 


3.20 


3.65 


1.00 


1.5 
Gener 


0.5 
al Rate (see n 


0.35 
otes) 


3.00 


3.35 


i " 


1.5 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.45 




1.5 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.18 


1.5 


1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


1.2 


1.5 


°3.7 


0.8 


0.5 


4.50 


4.95 


1.00 


2.8 


0.5 


0.33 


3.87 


4.17 


~ 


1.5 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 


1.6 


0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.09 


1.5 


1.5 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.18 


i " 


1.5 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 


2.2 


0.5 


0.33 


3.33 


3.63 


, 1.22 


1.5 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 


1.6 


0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.09 




1.35 


°2.6 


0.7 


0.45 


3.80 


4.25 


1.00 


2.1 


0.5 


0.30 


3.60 


3.90 


P 


1.5 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 


2.2 


0.5 


0.33 


3.33 


3.63 


•1 


1.5 


°3.6 


0.8 


0.5 


4.41 


4.86 


1.00 


2.7 


0.5 


0.33 


3.78 


4.08 




1.5 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 


1.6 


0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.09 


- 


- 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


1.5 


1.5 


°3.3 


0.8 


0.5 


4.14 


4.59 


1.00 


2.6 


0.5 


0.33 


3.69 


3.99 



206 



Municipal Electrical Service 



RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS FOR 

in Effect 



Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
(unless otherwise noted) and 



goj 

g & 

« So 
Dd O.c/3 

-^ t-H 

rt o 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



■Hz 



All-Electric 

Rate 

per Kwh 






.A £ 

=3 Q 



w-3 



Rate per Kwh 
for 



Cm 
O 


X o 

ZtN 


x © 

U O 











4.0 


2.0 


w0.8 


3.5 


1.2 


w0.7 


3.0 


1.2 


w0.7 


3.0 


- 


- 


2.8 


1.4 


0.8 


2.6 


1.3 


_ 


5.0 


1.8 


w0.7 


5.0 


2.0 


- 


3.6 


1.2 


w0.7 


4.0 


2.0 


w0.7 


4.4 


2.2 


- 


2.2 


1.1 


0.7 


5.0 


1.8 


w0.8 


5.0 


1.8 


- 


2.6 


1.1 


w0.7 


3.0 


1.4 


w0.7 


4.0 


1.4 


w0.8 


3.2 


1.6 


0.9 


3.6 


1.8 


w0.7 


4.0 


1.1 


w0.8 


3.4 


1.4 


w0.9 


4.0 


2.0 


w0.7 


4.0 


2.0 


- 


3.0 


1.3 


w0.8 


3.0 


1.5 


w0.7 


1.7 


1.1 


0.5 


3.5 


1.5 


w0.7 


3.1 


1.1 


w0.7 


3.5 


1.3 


w0.8 


4.0 


1.5 


- 


2.6 


1.3 


w0.8 


3.2 


1.6 


- 


3.0 


1.3 


w0.7 


3.4 


1.7 


0.8 


4.0 


1.7 


w0.7 


5.0 


2.0 


w0.9 


4.0 


1.5 


- 


2.8 


1.4 


0.8 


3.0 


1.3 


w0.7 


2.8 


1.3 


w0.7 






*3 v> 

o 2 

SO 

i I 
J I 

So 

s 



Net Monthly 
Bill for 







o 


o 
o 


$ 


$ 


6.00 


8.00 


4.15 


5.90 


3.51 


5.08 


3.67 


6.37 


3.78 


5.58 


3.51 


5.98 


6.10 


7.85 


6.50 


9.50 


4.20 


5.95 


6.00 


7.75 


6.60 


9.10 


2.97 


4.54 


6.10 


8.10 


6.10 


8.60 


3.15 


4.72 


3.87 


5.44 


4.80 


6.80 


4.32 


6.34 


5.40 


7.15 


3.78 


5.58 


4.05 


6.07 


6.00 


7.75 


6.00 


9.00 


3.69 


5.49 


4.50 


6.25 


2.74 


3.87 


4.75 


6.50 


3.37 


4.95 


4.35 


6.35 


5.00 


8.00 


3.51 


5.31 


4.32 


6.79 


4.10 


5.85 


4.59 


6.39 


5.40 


7.15 


6.50 


8.75 


5.00 


7.50 


3.78 


5.58 


4.10 


5.85 


3.60 


5.17 



Bolton 

Bothwell . . . 
Bowmanville 
Bracebridge 
Bradford . . 



N5% 
N5% 



Braeside 

Brampton N 10% 

Brantford N 5% 

Brantford Twp. . . N 5% 

Brechin 



Bridgeport N 



Brigden 

Brighton 

Brockville N 

Brussels 



t No. 

- 45 

- 45 

- 35 

- 39 
40 - 

- 36 

- 40 

- 41 

- 42 

- 40 

-#45 

- 45 

- 42 



42 



N5% 



Burford .... 

Burgessville 

Burk's Falls 

§§ Burlington N 5 

Cache Bay 



Caledonia N 5% 

Campbellford 

Campbellville . . N 10% 
Cannington 
iCapreol . . 



N 10% 



Cardinal 

Carleton Place 

Casselman N 5% 

Cayuga 

Chalk River N 5% 

Chapleau Twp. . . N 5% 

Chatham N 10% 

Chatsworth 

Chesley N 5% 

Chesterville 



45 

43 
43 
45 
42 

43 

45 

35 

#45 

42 

45 



- 40 

- 39 

-#38 

- 45 



1.1 



1.1 1.1 

4.2 1.0 

Small Commercial 

□ I 1.0 I 1.0 

I 4.0 | 1.0 
Small Commercial 





□ 5.0 1.0 

Small Commercial 
□ 



- 


3.0 


1.2 


1.0 


1.1 


1.1 


- 



1.1 

□ 
□ 

□ 


□ 
□ 

Small Commercial 
□ 



1.0 
1.2 

1.0 
1.1 
1.1 



1.0 



1.0 



Small Commercial 



46 



□ 





□ 

D/zl.O 



1.1 






1.0 
1.1 

3.0 

6.0 
1.0 



1.0 
1.1 
1.0 



1.1 
1.0 



No. 
50 
50 
50 
60 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 

50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 





1.0 
1.0 

1.1 

1.2 
1.1 

1.1 
1.0 
1.2 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 

1.0 
1.0 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.3 

1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.2 
1.1 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
1.2 

1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.1 

1.0 

1.1 
1.0 

1.1 

1.0 

1.1 



$ 

2.00 
1.75 
1.50 
0.83 
1.39 

0.83 
2.50 
2.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.11 

2.50 
2.50 
1.11 
1.50 
2.00 
1.39 

1.50 
2.00 
1.67 
2.00 
2.25 
1.67 

2.00 
1.67 

1.75 
1.67 
2.25 
2.25 

1.30 
1.11 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 

2.50 
2.00 
1.39 
2.00 
1.40 



Statement C 



207 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1968 

are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
a minimum monthly charge 





^ 




COMMERCIAL SERVICE 






INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 






2. 


Demand Rate 














M 


per Kilowatt 
50 Cents 


NetM 


onthly 


* 


Energy Rate per Kwh 


Net Monthly 


c 


Bill for 


US 


for Use of 


Bill for Use 


'2. 

o 


Minimum 50 Cents 


Use of 1 Kw 
of Demand 


u 

a 


Each Kw of Demand 


of 1 Y 

of Den 


Cw 


Sf 


Energy Rate per 


and 


00 O 


Kwh for Use of 
Each Kw of Demand 














!2^ 


c ** 
•^3 O 






(2 












1- (U 


ts .i 








TD 


First 
Block 


Second 
Block 








!& 








t 






C 


V) 






E 


<" £ 






3 






E 






3 






o 
U 




3 
O 


3 

O 


.i o 

S 1 


3 
O 


3 
O 


a 






.i o 

2 B 


3 
O 


3 

O 




one- 


X 


«-E 


3 -a 


DC 


X 




Hours' Use 


Hours' Use 


% -a 


X 


X 






J58 


x© 


c 

5-2 


o 
o 


© 

o 




50 100 


50 100 


2 c 

3 ° 


o 
o 


o 

o 






fc^H 


Z^ 


< <3 


<N 


<"<"> 








<~ 


(N 


fl 





* 


* 


* 


i 


$ 


$ 


$ 


t t 


t t 


t 


$ 


$ 


1.3 


1.35 




General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 






- 


1.5 


°1.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.15 


1.00 


1.2 


0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.73 


1.2 


1.5 


2.0 


- 


1.0 


3.15 


4.05 


1.20 


1.4 


0.9 


0.30 


2.38 


2.65 


1.1 


1.5 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 


_ 


1.5 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.18 


1.2 


1.35 


2.5 


0.7 


0.45 


3.70 


4.15 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.35 


3.50 


3.85 








General Rate (see notes) 






Genei 


al Rate (see r 


lotes) 






1.1 


1.5 


2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


3.70 


4.20 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


3.30 


3.63 


- 


1.5 


°1.7 


0.8 


0.5 


2.70 


3.15 


1.00 


1.2 


0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.73 


1.2 


1.35 


2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


4.10 


4.60 


1.00 


2.1 


0.5 


0.35 


3.60 


3.95 


1.1 


1.5 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 


1.0 


1.5 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 








General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






- 


1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 I 0.5 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


2.31 - 0.5 1 0.33 


3.42 


3.72 








General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






- 


1.5 


°3.5 


0.8 


0.5 


4.32 


4.77 


1.00 


2.9 


0.5 


0.33 


3.96 


4.26 


1.4 


1.5 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 


1.9 


0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


1.0 


1.35 


2.5 


0.7 


0.45 


3.70 


4.15 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.40 


3.20 


3.60 


1.1 


1.5 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


1.5 


0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.00 


- 


1.35 




General 


Rate (see i 


lotes) 






General Rate (see r 


lotes) 






- 


1.5 


°1.2 


0.8 1 0.5 [ 2.25 


2.70 


1.00 


0.71 - 0.5 


0.33 


1.98 


2.28 


1.2 


1.35 


°2.5 


0.7 I 0.45 I 3.70 


4.15 


1.00 


2.0| - 0.5 


0.30 


3.50 


3.80 








General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






— 


1.35 


2.7 


0.7 


0.45 


3.90 


4.35 


1.00 


2.3 


0.5 


0.35 


3.80 


4.15 


_ 


1.5 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 


- 


1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 


- 


SI. 35 




General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








1.5 


°3.0 


0.8 | 0.5 | 3.87 
General Rate (see notes) 

| 


4.32 


1.00 


2.5| - 0.5 1 0.33 
General Rate (see notes) 


3.60 


3.90 








General Rate (see i 


lotes) 






1 1 
General Rate (see notes) 






1.2 


1.35 


3.3 


1.0 


0.45 


4.80 


5.25 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.35 


3.30 


3.65 


- 


1.5 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


1.2 


1.35 


2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.40 


3.90 


1.00 


1.6 


0.6 


0.40 


3.20 


3.60 




1.5 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 



208 



Municipal Electrical Service 

RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS FOR 



Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
(unless otherwise noted) and 



£§-2 



oJ awi 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



All-Electric 

Rate 

per Kwh 



.So 



<| 

^•2 



co -a 

E 

3 

z 



Rate per Kwh 
for 






X o 

«i o 



X O 

z£ 



.J. £ 

3£ 



Net Monthly 
Bill for 



Chippawa N 5% 

Clifford 

Clinton 

fCobalt 

Cobden 

Cobourg N 5% 

Cochrane N 5% 

Colborne 

Cold water N 5% 

Collingwood ... N 10% 

Comber 

Coniston N 5% 

Cookstown 

Cottam 

Courtright 

Creemore N 10% 

Dashwood 

Deep River 

Delaware 

Delhi N 5% 

Deseronto N 10% 

Dorchester 

Drayton 

Dresden 

Drumbo 

Dryden 

Dublin 

Dundalk 

Dundas N 5% 

Dunnville 

Durham N 10% 

Dutton N 5% 

East York N 5% 

Eganville N 5% 

jElkLake 

Elmira 

Elmvale 

Elmwood 

Elora N 5% 

Embro N 5% 



41 



45 



No. 
42 

45 
41 
42 
36 

43 

39 
43 
46 
41 

45 
44 

45 

45 

44 

40 
44 
43 

44 
43 
44 
44 
45 

35 
40 
44 
45 

45 

40 

47 

35 



42 



t t t 

□ 2.5 1.0 

Small Commercial 



1.1 
1.1 
4.0 



39 



44 



□ 
□ 

1.1 

□ 

Small Commercial 
3.0 

1.1 


□ 



Small Commercial 







1.1 
1.1 
1.1 



1.1 



1.1 



- 


1.1 


1.2 


1.1 


zl.O 


1.0 


1.2 


1.1 


1.1 


2.5 



1.2 
1.1 



zl.O 



1.0 




1.2 
1.1 


□ 


□ 
□ 
□ 
□ 

□ 

1.1 



Small Commercial 
1.1 1.1 1.1 




Small Commercial 

□ I 1.0 I 1.0 

I - | 
Small Commercial 

1.22 



1.1 



3.2 
1.0 



1.1 



1.0 
1.0 



No. 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
60 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



t 

3.4 
4.0 
3.0 
3.0 
4.0 
2.0 

3.0 
3.0 
4.5 
3.8 
2.8 
2.5 

3.0 
3.4 
3.5 
2.6 
2.8 
4.0 

2.5 
3.6 
3.4 
4.0 
2.3 

3.0 
2.8 
3.4 
3.0 

2.8 

3.8 
2.8 
2.8 
3.8 
3.8 
2.8 

2.8 
3.5 
3.5 
3.3 
2.6 
2.6 
3.6 

3.0 
2.6 
2.6 
4.5 
3.5 



t 

1.7 
2.0 
1.5 
1.5 
2.0 
1.0 

1.4 
1.5 
1.6 

1.4 
1.2 

1.5 
1.3 
1.4 
1.1 
1.4 
2.0 

1.1 
1.8 
1.4 
1.7 
1.1 

1.2 
1.4 
1.7 
1.5 
1.4 

1.9 
1.3 
1.4 
1.9 
1.9 
1.4 

1.2 
1.3 

1.3 
1.2 
1.3 
1.3 
1.8 

1.5 
1.3 
1.3 

1.7 
1.2 



w0.7 

0.9 

0.9 

w0.8 

0.7 

w0.7 

w0.8 

w0.7 
w0.7 

0.9 
w0.7 

w0.7 

0.8 

w0.8 

w0.6 
1.1 

w0.8 
0.7 

w0.7 
0.8 
1.0 

w0.8 
0.8 

w0.7 
0.8 
0.8 

w0.7 



w0.7 
w0.7 



w0.7 

w0.8 

0.8 

0.8 

0.7 

w0.7 

w0.7 



1.0 
1.1 
1.2 
1.2 

1.0 

1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 

1.1 

L2 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 

1.0 
1.5 
0.9 
1.1 
1.0 

1.0 
1.1 
1.4 
1.1 
1.1 

1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
0.9 

1.0 
1.0 

0.9 
1.0 
1.2 
1.1 

1.2 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 



$ 
1.75 
2.00 
1.39 
1.11 
1.39 
1.67 

2.00 
2.00 
2.25 
0.83 
1.50 
2.00 

1.11 
2.00 
2.00 
1.67 
1.11 
2.22 

1.25 
1.11 
1.67 
2.00 
1.50 

1.50 
0.83 
1.11 
1.67 
1.11 

1.90 
1.67 
1.11 
1.90 
1.90 
0.83 

1.40 
1.75 
1.75 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.39 

1.39 
1.11 
1.11 

2.25 
1.75 



$ 
5.10 
6.00 
4.05 
4.05 
5.40 
2.70 

4.30 
4.50 
5.45 
3.76 
4.20 
3.65 

4.05 
4.30 
4.55 
3.15 
3.78 
5.40 

3.45 
4.86 
4.05 
4.86 
3.35 

3.90 
3.78 
4.59 
4.05 
3.78 

5.13 
3.60 
3.78 
5.70 
5.70 
3.78 

3.80 
4.35 
4.35 
4.05 
3.90 
3.90 
4.86 

4.05 
3.51 
3.51 
5.65 
4.15 



Statement C 



209 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

December 31, 1967 

are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
a minimum monthly charge 







COMMERCIAL SERVICE 




INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 






IS 

*a 

do O 
C ** 
•- <i> 
«.£ 

4> «-• 

Eg 


Demand Rate 














s 


per Kilowatt 

50 Cents 

Minimum 50 Cents 


Net Monthly 

Bill for 
Use of 1 Kw 
of Demand 


u 

0* 
T3 

C 
CO 

E 
u 

Q 


Energy Rate per Kwh 

for Use of 
Each Kw of Demand 


NetMc 

Billfo 

of 1 

ofDer 


nthly 
r Use 
Kw 


h 


Energy Rate per 

Kwh for Use of 

Each Kw of Demand 


nand 


3* 

1- 4; 


First 
Block 

Hours'. Use 
50 100 


Second 
Block 

Hours' Use 
50 100 


±8 

3-2 




I* 

E 

U 


3 
O 

l§ 


3 
O 

x© 

£2 


14 

3 

.i o 

<| 
3£ 


3 

O 

X 

© 
o 


3 

o 
X 
© 

o 


3 

O 

X 
o 

o 


3 

o 
X 
o 

o 


* 


1.35 


t 

( 


General 


late (see 


$ 

notes) 


$ 


$ 


t t t t t 
General Rate (see notes) 


$ 


$ 


1.2 
1.1 


1.5 
1.5 


°2.7 
°2.6 
°3.6 
°1.9 


0.8 
0.8 
0.8 
0.8 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 


3.60 
3.51 
4.41 
2.88 


4.05 
3.96 
4.86 
3.33 


1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 


2.2 
2.0 
2.4 
1.3 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 


0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 


3.33 
3.15 
3.51 

2.52 


3.63 
3.45 
3.81 
2.82 


1.2 


1.35 


2.2 


0.7 


0.45 


3.40 


3.85 


1.00 


1.3 


0.5 


0.35 


2.80 


3.15 


1.4 


1.35 
1.5 
1.35 
1.35 


2.8 
3.0 

( 
1.8 


0.8 

[Jeneral 
0.7 


0.45 

1.0 

Rate (see 

0.45 


4.10 
4.05 
notes) 
3.00 


4.55 
4.95 

3.45 


1.00 
1.35 

1.00 


2.0 
2.8 

Genei 
1.3 


0.5 
1.8 
•al Rate (see r 
0.5 


0.35 
0.33 
lotes) 
0.35 


3.50 
3.58 

2.80 


3.85 
3.88 

3.15 


- 


1.5 


°2.7 
2.6 


0.8 
0.7 


0.5 
0.45 


3.60 
3.80 


4.05 
4.25 


1.00 
1.00 


2.2 
2.1 


0.5 
0.5 


0.33 
0.35 


3.33 
3.60 


3.63 
3.95 


1.5 


1.5 
1.5 
1.5 


°2.0 
°2.8 
°3.5 


0.8 
0.8 
0.8 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 


2.97 
3.69 
4.32 


3.42 
4.14 

4.77 


1.00 
1.00 
1.00 


1.4 

2.3 
2.4 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 


0.33 
0.33 
0.33 


2.61 
3.42 
3.51 


2.91 
3.72 
3.81 


?1.0 


1.35 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

#1.35 


"1.6 

°3.1 

°2.4 
°3.6 

( 


0.7 
0.8 
0.8 
0.8 
General 


0.45 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
late (see 


2.80 
3.96 
3.33 
4.41 
notes) 


3.25 
4.41 
3.78 
4.86 


1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 


1.1 
2.4 
1.7 
2.6 
Genei 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
al Rate (see n 


0.30 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
otes) 


2.60 
3.51 
2.88 
3.69 


2.90 
3.81 
3.18 
3.99 


1.2 


1.35 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 


°2.4 
°2.6 
°2.9 
°2.8 
°2.7 


0.7 
0.8 
0.8 
0.8 
0.8 


0.45 

0.5 

0.5 

0.5 

0.5 


3.60 
3.51 
3.78 
3.69 
3.60 


4.05 
3.96 
4.23 
4.14 
4.05 


1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 


1.7 
2.1 

2.2 
2.3 
2.2 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 


0.30 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 


3.20 
3.24 
3.33 
3.42 
3.33 


3.50 
3.54 
3.63 
3.72 
3.63 


1.2 
1.4 

1.1 


1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.35 


°3.1 

°2.5 

°2.3 

2.6 


0.8 
0.8 
0.8 
0.8 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 


3.96 
3.42 
3.24 
3.90 


4.41 
3.87 
3.69 
4.40 


1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 


2.4 
2.3 
1.7 
1.7 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 


0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.35 


3.51 
3.42 
2.88 
3.20 


3.81 
3.72 
3.18 
3.55 


1.1 


1.5 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


1.9 


0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


1.1 


1.35 
1.35 


°2.1 
2.2 


0.7 
0.8 


0.45 
0.5 


3.30 
3.50 


3.75 
4.00 


1.00 
1.00 


1.5 
1.7 


0.5 
0.6 


0.30 
0.40 


3.00 
3.30 


3.30 
3.70 


1.2 


1.35 
1.35 


°2.0 
2.4 


0.7 
0.7 


0.45 
0.45 


3.20 
3.60 


3.65 
4.05 


1.00 
1.00 


1.3 
1.8 


0.5 
0.5 


0.35 
0.35 


2.80 
3.30 


3.15 
3.65 


1.1 


1.5 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 


2.4 


0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


1 2 


1.5 
1.5 
1.5 


°2.8 

°2.1 

°2.3 
C 
C 


0.8 

0.8 

0.8 

Jeneral 

Jeneral ] 


0.5 

0.5 

0.5 
late (see 
Hate (see 


3.69 
3.06 
3.24 
notes) 
notes) 


4.14 
3.51 
3.69 


1.00 
1.00 
1.00 


1.9 

1.6 

1.8 

Gener 

Gener 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
al Rate (see n 
al Rate (see n 


0.33 
0.33 
0.33 

otes) 

otes) 


3.06 
2.79 
2.97 | 


3.36 
3.09 



210 



Municipal Electrical Service 

RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS FOR 



in Effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
(unless otherwise noted) and 



X> 



2* 



OC o.!/) 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



All-Electric 

Rate 

per Kwh 



.tao 






I! 



Rate per Kwh 
for 



2 * 

la 

u- o 



x o 



X o 
<a o 



.J. ^ 
35 



I 2 

SO 

§•1 

gU 



Net Monthly 
Bill for 



§§Embrun N 10% 

|Englehart 

Erieau 

Erie Beach 

Erin 

Espanola N 5% 

Essex 

Etobicoke 

Exeter 

Fenelon Falls ... N 5% 

Fergus 

Finch N 5% 

Flesherton 

Fonthill N 5% 

Forest N 5% 

Fort William 

(Comm. & Indust. N 5%) 

Frankford 

Gait N 5% 

Georgetown 

Glen Williams 

fGeraldton 

Glencoe N 5% 

§§Gloucester Twp. N 10% 

Goderich N 5% 

jGogama 

Grand Bend 

Grand Valley ... N 10% 

Granton 

Gravenhurst .... N 5% 

Grimsby 

§§Guelph N5% 

Hagersville N 5% 

fHaileybury 

Hamilton * 

Hanover N 10% 

Harriston N 5% 



No. 
39 
42 
45 
45 
40 

#40 

43 
40 
40 
40 

41 
42 
40 
41 
41 



50 



4.0 

4.0 



t 



1.2 
1.1 

D 



1.5 1.0 

Small Commercial 



1.1 



1.0 



1.1 



1.0 



Small Commercial 



1.0 



Small Commercial 
0/1.2 

D/1.2 




3.4 



1.2 




Small Commercial 

□ 5.0 [ 1.0 
Small Commercial 

□ 1.0 | 1.0 
Small Commercial 

1.5 
1.35 





Small Commercial 
.1 1.1 1.1 
□ 2.0 1.0 



1.0 
4.0 
1.1 

3.2 



1.0 
1.1 
1.1 



1.0 



Small Commercial 



No. 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
60 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
60 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
60 
50 
50 
50 



t 
4.0 
4.0 
2.8 
4.0 
3.0 

3.7 
4.0 
3.0 
4.4 
3.6 
3.0 

4.0 
3.5 
2.0 
3.0 
2.8 
2.8 

3.0 

2.6 
3.6 
3.6 
3.2 
3.2 
4.0 

3.0 
3.0 
5.0 
5.0 
3.0 
2.7 
7.0 
4.0 

2.8 
3.9 
3.0 
3.0 

3.2 
4.0 

3.0 
4.0 
2.8 
2.8 
3.8 
4.0 



i 

1.8 
2.0 
1.4 
2.0 
1.5 

1.4 
1.5 
1.5 

1.8 
1.4 

1.5 
1.3 
1.1 
1.5 
1.3 
1.3 

1.2 

1.3 
1.3 
1.5 
1.5 
1.6 
2.0 

1.1 
1.1 

2.1 
2.1 
1.2 

1.4 
3.5 
2.0 

1.1 

1.2 
1.5 
1.6 



1.5 
2.0 

1.4 
1.6 
1.7 



w0.7 
w0.8 



w0.7 



w0.8 
w0.7 

w0.7 
w0.7 
0.6 
w0.7 
w0.7 



w0.7 
w0.8 
w0.9 

w0.7 

w0.7 

0.7 
0.7 



w0.7 



w0.7 



w0.8 



w0.7 
w0.8 



w0.8 
w0.8 



i 

1.0 
1.1 
0.8 
1.1 
1.2 

1.0 
1.1 
1.2 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 

1.1 
1.0 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 

0.9 

1.1 
1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.2 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 
1.6 
1.4 

1.0 
1.4 
1.0 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 

1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 



$ 

2.00 
1.39 
2.22 
2.78 
1.39 

2.50 
2.50 
1.11 
2.22 
2.22 
1.50 

2.00 
1.75 
1.11 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 

1.67 

1.11 
1.80 
1.80 
2.00 
2.00 
2.22 

1.50 
1.50 
2.50 
2.50 
1.50 
1.50 
2.78 
2.50 

1.40 
1.11 
2.00 
2.00 
1.39 
2.00 

1.50 
1.39 
0.83 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 



$ 
5.60 
5.40 
3.78 
5.40 
4.05 

4.65 
5.00 
4.05 
4.26 
4.86 
4.30 

4.50 
4.35 
2.88 
4.50 
4.00 
4.00 

3.51 

3.51 
4.40 
4.80 
4.14 
4.32 
5.40 

3.70 
3.70 
6.70 
6.70 
3.90 
4.15 
9.45 
5.40 

3.60 
4.50 
3.90 
4.50 
4.32 
5.60 

4.50 
5.40 
3.58 
4.20 
5.10 
5.40 



* Prompt payment discount 5% 



Statement C 



21 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

December 31, 1968 

are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
a minimum monthly charge 



COMMERCIAL SERVICE 



fa 

c ** 

W > 

5 «> 



Demand Rate 

per Kilowatt 

50 Cents 

Minimum 50 Cents 



Energy Rate per 

Kwh for Use of 

Each Kw of Demand 



.i. o 
21 



<*a 



Net Monthly 

Bill for 
Use of 1 Kw 
of Demand 



INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 



Energy Rate per Kwh 

for Use of 
Each Kw of Demand 



First 
Block 



Hours'. Use 
50 100 



Second 
Block 



Hours' Use 
50 100 



« 



Net Monthly 
Bill for Use 

of lKw 
of Demand 



1.35 

1.5 

1.5 



1.35 



1.5 



1.5 
1.35 



1.5 

1.35 

1.35 



1.35 

1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.35 

1.35 

1.35 

1.5 
1.5 



1.5 
1.35 

181.35 
1.5 




°2.2 
°3.6 
°2.8 
°3.5 
°2.5 

2.1 

°2.7 
°2.6 
°3.0 
y2.0 



* 

0.7 
0.8 
0.8 
0.8 
0.8 

0.7 

0.8 
0.8 
0.8 



t 

0.45 

0.5 

0.5 

0.5 

0.5 

0.45 

0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
1.2 



$ 
3.40 
4.41 
3.69 
4.32 
3.42 

3.30 

3.60 
3.51 

3.87 



'2.8 0.8 0.5 3.69 

General Rate (see notes) 

'1.6 I 0.8 | 0.5 | 2.61 
General Rate (see notes) 

2.1 0.8 0.5 3.40 



al.8 

°1.8 
2.0 

°2.4 
°2.6 

°3.7 

2.2 

2.3 

1.9 

5.8 
°3.8 

°2.2 
3.4 



'2.7 
"2.5 



'3.6 
2.0 
1.8 



0.8 


0.5 


- 


0.45 


0.8 


0.5 


0.7 


0.45 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.45 


0.7 


0.45 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.7 


0.45 


- 


1.3 



2.70 

2.79 
3.20 

3.33 
3.51 
4.50 

3.50 

3.60 

3.10 

6.39 

4.59 

3.40 
4.68 
General Rate (see notes) 



0.8 
0.8 



0.5 
0.5 



General Rate (see 

0.5 

0.5 

0.5 

Rate (see 



General 
first 200 kwh 



0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 


0.8 


0.5 



3.60 
3.80 

notes) 
4.41 
3.14 
3.10 

notes) 



$ 
3.85 
4.86 
4.14 
4.77 
3.87 

3.75 

4.05 
3.96 

4.32 



4.14 
3.06 
3.90 

3.15 

3.24 
3.65 

3.78 
3.96 
4.95 

4.00 

4.05 

3.55 

6.84 
5.04 

3.85 

5.85 



4.05 
4.30 



4.86 
3.61 
3.60 



$ 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 

1.00 

1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.20 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

0.90 

1.00 
l.OOS 

1.00 
1.00 
1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1.00 
1.00 

1.00 
1.35 



1.00 
1.00 



1.00 
1.00 
1.00 



2.6 



t 
1.6 

2.4 
2.5 
2.6 
1.7 



2.0 
1.9 

2.3 



0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 

0.5 

0.6 

0.5 
0.5 
0.5 



1.0 



0.30 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 
0.33 

0.40 

0.33 
0.38 
0.33 
0.50 



2.0 - 0.5 0.33 
General Rate (see notes) 

1.0 I - 0.5 0.33 
General Rate (see notes) 

1.6 - 0.5 0.35 



.26 



1.1 
1.3 

1.7 
2.0 
2.8 

1.7 

1.8 

1.5 

5.1 
2.8 



0.81 



0.5 
0.5 

0.5 
0.5 
0.5 

0.6 

0.6 

0.5 

0.5 
0.5 

0.5 



0.45 

0.33 
0.40 

0.33 
0.33 
0.33 

0.40 

0.35 

0.35 

0.33 
0.33 

0.30 
0.33 



General Rate (see notes) 



2.2 
1.8 



0.5 
0.5 



0.33 
0.35 



General Rate (see notes) 



2.4 
1.3 
1.3 



0.5 
0.5 
0.5 



0.33 
0.35 
0.35 



$ 

3.10 
3.51 
3.60 
3.69 
2.88 

3.10 

3.15 
3.06 
3.42 
2.95 

3.15 

2.25 

3.10 

2.39 

2.34 
2.80 

2.88 
3.15 
3.87 

3.30 

3.40 

3.00 

5.94 
3.87 

2.90 
3.45 



3.33 
3.30 



3.51 
2.66 
2.80 



$ 

3.40 
3.81 
3.90 
3.99 
3.18 

3.50 

3.45 
3.40 
3.72 
3.45 

3.45 

2.55 

3.45 

2.84 

2.64 
3.20 

3.18 
3.45 

4.17 

3.70 

3.75 

3.35 

6.24 
4.17 

3.20 
3.74 



3.63 
3.65 



3.81 
2.99 
3.15 



General Rate (see notes) 



212 



Municipal Electrical Service 



RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS FOR 

in Effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
(unless otherwise noted) and 



U Wl S 

o " « 
w S o 

cd aw 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



■5 2 



All-Electric 

Rate 

per Kwh 






.A * 

T3 ^ 



55 



* JS 

32 



X) -3 

E 



Rate per Kwh 
for 



2 * 

IS 



X O 



X o 

Z?> 



5-B 



SO 
6 & 

1J 

Ho 



Net Monthly 
Bill for 



Harrow N 5% 

Hastings N 5% 

Havelock 

Hawkesbury .... N 5% 

Hearst 

Hensall 

fHepworth 

Hespeler N 5% 

Highgate 

Holstein 

f Hornepayne 

jHudson 

Huntsville N 5% 

Ingersoll N 5% 

Iroquois 

Jarvis 

tJellicoe 

Kapuskasing .... N 5% 

fKearns Townsite 

Kemptville 

Kenora 

Keewatin 

Killaloe Station 

Kincardine N 10% 

King City N 10% 

|King Kirkland 

Kingston N 5% 

Kingsville N 5% 

Kirkfield 

tKirland Lake 

f Swastika 

Kitchener N 5% 

Lakefield N 10% 

Lambeth 

Lanark N 5% 

Lancaster N 5% 

Larder Lake Twp. 



i No. 
-#42 

- 41 

- 40 

- 42 

- 45 

- 45 

- 45 

- 38 

- 45 

- 41 

- 60 

- 45 

- 40 
-S40 

- 40 

- 45 

- 45 

- 35 

- 45 

- 43 

- S 

- S 

- 42 

- 43 

- 42 

- 42 



4 

3.5 



i 
1.0 



□ 
□ 
□ 
□ 

Small Commercial 
1.1 



1.0 




1.2 


1.1 


1.22 


- 


□ 


1.6 


1.2 


- 


1.1 


- 





6.6 





4.4 


□ 


- 


□ 


1.0 


D/1.2 


- 


1.1 


_ 





4.4 


□ 


- 



1.33 
1.2 



1.0 



1.2 



Small Commercial 



1.22 


_ 





1.1 





4.0 





- 





3.0 


1.22 


- 


n 


- 




1.0 





_ 





2.0 


1.22 


- 





1.0 



1.1 

1.0 
1.0 

1.1 

1.0 



Small Commercial 






1.0 


1.1 


1.1 


D 


- 


□ 


1.0 


1.2 


- 



1.0 

1.1 



1.0 



No. 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

60 
50 
50 
60 
60 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
60 



t 
4.5 
4.0 

2.8 
3.4 
3.4 
4.6 

3.2 
3.6 
3.2 
3.2 
3.0 

6.6 
4.4 
2.8 
4.0 

2.8 

3.2 
4.4 
3.8 
4.0 
3.6 
4.0 

3.0 
4.0 
4.2 
2.8 
3.6 
3.6 

2.8 
3.0 
3.2 
3.6 
3.6 
3.6 
4.0 

3.0 
3.5 
2.5 
3.4 
3.5 



t 

1.5 
1.5 
1.3 
1.5 
2.0 
1.5 



2.3 
2.2 
1.1 
1.3 
1.4 

1.6 

2.2 
1.4 
1.7 
1.8 
1.5 

1.5 
1.5 
2.1 
1.1 
1.7 
1.8 

1.1 
1.3 
1.6 
1.8 
1.8 
1.2 
1.4 

1.2 
1.7 
1.1 
1.2 



t 

w0.8 
w0.7 
w0.8 
w0.7 

w0.7 



w0.8 
w0.7 



wl.O 
w0.9 
w0.7 
w0.6 
w0.7 

0.9 
w0.9 



w0.8 
w0.8 

0.8 
0.8 
w0.8 
w0.6 
w0.7 
w0.8 



w0.7 

1.0 

w0.8 

w0.8 

0.7 

0.7 

w0.7 
w0.8 
w0.7 
w0.7 



t 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 
1.0 

1.1 
1.1 

1.0 

1.1 

1.0 
0.9 
1.0 

1.33 

1.2 

1.0 

1.0 

1.1 

1.3 
1.2 
1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 

1.2 
1.2 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 

1.1 

1.0 
1.0 

1.1 
1.1 
1.1 

1.0 

1.1 

1.0 
1.3 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 



$ 
2.25 
2.00 
1.40 
2.00 
2.00 
2.78 

0.83 
1.67 
2.00 
0.83 
1.11 

3.33 
2.22 
1.40 
2.00 
1.67 

0.83 
2.22 
2.00 
2.00 
1.39 
2.00 

1.00 
1.00 
2.22 
1.40 
1.80 
1.39 

2.00 
2.00 
1.67 
1.39 
1.39 
2.00 
2.00 

1.50 
1.75 
1.50 
1.70 
1.11 



$ 
5.25 
5.00 
3.60 
4.70 
5.70 
4.77 

3.44 
4.86 
4.80 
3.27 
3.33 

7.11 
5.94 
3.60 
4.60 
3.78 

4.32 
5.94 
4.70 
5.40 
4.86 
4.50 

4.05 
4.50 
5.67 
3.60 
5.20 
4.86 

3.60 
4.10 
4.32 
4.86 
4.86 
4.20 
4.80 

3.90 
4.63 
3.45 
4.10 
3.77 



Statement C 



213 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1968 

are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
a minimum monthly charge 







COMMERCIAL SERVICE 


INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 




rt 


Demand Rate 














BD 




per Kilowatt 

50 Cents 

Minimum 50 Cents 


Net Monthly 


=s 


Energy Rate per Kwh 


Net Monthly 


s 


BUI for 


U 


for Use of 


Bill for Use 


cial Cooki 
rKwh 




Use of 1 Kw 
of Demand 




4> 


Each Kw of Demand 


of 1 
of Den 


Kw 


Energy Rate per 


land 




Kwh for Use of 






tfl 












:g u 


Each Kw of Demand 






(A 












>- <u 


«.i 








"O 


First 
Block 


Second 
Block 








|a 


•1 






e 






c 


v> 






E 






s 






E 






3 






1 


3* 


3 
O 


3 



.JL. O 

2« 


3 



3 



a 








3 



3 





~ K 


-K 


3"3 


X 


X 




Hours'.Use 


Hours' Use 


"^ — 1 


ad 


X 






£2 


x© 


"j c 

3* 








en 




50 100 


50 100 


2 c 
3-2 











t 


* 


t 


i 


* 


$ 


$ 


$ 


i t 


tf « 


* 


$ 


$ 


- 


#1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 










General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






1.2 


1.5 


°2.3 1 0.8 0.5 3.24 


3.69 


1.00 


1.7 - 0.5 0.33 


2.88 


3.18 


- 


#1.35 


General Rate (see 


notes) 






General Rate (see n 


otes) 






1.2 


1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


_ 


1.5 


2.7 


_ 


0.9 


3.69 


4.50 


1.20 


2.1 


1.4 


0.30 


2.92 


3.19 


1.5 


1.5 


°3.2 


0.8 


0.5 


4.05 


4.50 


1.00 


2.4 


0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


- 


1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






Gene 


al Rate (see n 


Dtes) 






- 


- 


2.8 


- 


0.7 


3.60 


4.23 


1.35 


2.6 


1.7 


0.33 


3.45 


3.74 




- 


2.5 


- 


0.8 


3.42 


4.14 


1.35 


3.5 


2.3 


0.33 


4.12 


4.42 


1.5 


1.5 


°6.0 


0.8 


0.5 


6.57 


7.02 


1.00 


4.3 


0.5 


0.33 


5.22 


5.52 


1.2 


1.5 


°3.8 


0.8 


0.5 


4.59 


5.04 


1.00 


3.3 


0.5 


0.33 


4.32 


4.62 


1.1 


1.35 


°1.9 


0.7 


0.4 


3.10 


3.50 


1.00 


1.0 


0.5 


0.30 


2.50 


2.80 


1.35 


#1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






1.1 


1.5 


°2.0 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.42 


1.00 


1.5 


0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3,00 


- 


1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


2.3 


0.5 


0.33 


3.42 


3.72 


1.2 


1.5 


°3.8 


0.8 


0.5 


4.59 


5.04 


1.00 


3.3 


0.5 


0.33 


4.32 


4.62 


1.1 


1.35 


2.7 


0.8 


0.45 


4.00 


4.45 


1.00 


2.0 


0.6 


0.40 


3.60 


4.00 


1.1 


1.5 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 


2.4 


0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.81 




- 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


- 


- 


°3.8 


0.8 


0.5 


4.59 


5.04 


1.35 


2.2 


0.5 


0.33 


3.64 


3.94 


1 " 


- 


°4.8 


0.8 


0.5 


5.49 


5.94 


1.35 


2.2 


0.5 


0.33 


3.64 


3.94 




1.5 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


12 


1.35 


°2.4 


0.7 


0.45 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.30 


3.30 


3.60 


1.1 


1.35 


°2.0 


0.7 


0.45 


3.20 


3.65 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.30 


3.20 


3.50 


1.1 


1.5 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 


2.4 


0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.81 




1.35 


2.0 


0.7 


0.45 


3.20 


3.65 


1.00 


1.3 


0.5 


0.35 


2.80 


3.15 






General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






1.2 


1.5 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.33 


3.15 


3.45 


1.1 


1.5 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 


2.4 


0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


1.1 


1.5 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 


2.4 


0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.81 




1.35 


2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.50 


4.00 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.33 


3.20 


3.53 




1.35 


°2.7 


0.7 


0.45 


3.90 


4.35 


1.00 


1.6 


0.5 


0.30 


3.10 


3.40 




- 


°3.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.96 


4.41 


1.00 


2.6 


0.5 


0.33 


3.69 


3.99 




#1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see m 


)tes) 










General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








- 


3.0 


- 


1.0 


4.05 


4.95 


1.35 


3.1 - 


2.0 - | 


0.33 


3.81 


4.10 



214 



Municipal Electrical Service 



RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS FOR 

in Effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
(unless otherwise noted) and 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



2£ 



O.V3 
O 



■a* 



K 2, 
8 



All-Electric 

Rate 

per Kwh 



5 



3-2 



3! 



Rate per Kwh 
for 



o 

1H 

ft, o 



X 1 o 
U o 



x o 
Z^ 






so 



Net Monthly 
Bill for 



Latchford 

Leamington N 5% 

Lindsay N 5% 

Listowel 

London N 5% 

L'Orignal 

Lucan N 5% 

Lucknow 

Lynden 

Madoc 

Magnetawan .... N 5% 

Markdale 

Markham 

Marmora N 5% 

Martintown 

Massey N 5% 

f Matachewan 

fMatheson 

fMattawa N 5% 

Maxville N 5% 

McGarry Twp 

Meaford N 5% 

Merlin 

Merrickville 

Midland N 5% 

Mildmay 

Millbrook 

Milton N 10% 

Milverton N 5% 

Mississauga N 5% 

Mitchell N 5% 

Moore field N 5% 

Morrisburg 

Mount Brydges 

Mount Forest . . N 10% 

Napanee 

§§NepeanTwp N 5% 

Neustadt N 5% 

Newborn N 5% 

Newburgh 



45 



i No. 

- 43 

- 44 



41 

38 

40 
40 
45 
43 
40 

45 

44 
43 

38 

45 
45 
45 

#45 
#46 

40 
#42 
44 
41 
45 

40 
43 
43 
44 

40 



40 



1.1 
1.0 
1.0 

Small Commercial 
1.1 1.1 

1.0 1.0 





1.1 
1.0 
1.0 



□ 

□ 
1.1 



1.2 



□ 



1.1 

2.0 



1.1 
1.1 



4.5 



1.1 
1.0 



1.1 
1.1 



Small Commercial 



1.5 


- 





3.0 


1.22 


- 


1.22 


- 


9 


- 


□ 


- 


1.2 


_ 





- 


1.2 


- 


□ 


1.1 





- 


1.1 


_ 


D 


- 


□ 


- 


□ 


2.0 



1.1 



1.0 



Small Commercial 

| zl.O |zl.O 
Small Commercial 



□ 

□ 3.2 1.0 
Small Commercial 



- 40 



□ 


1.1 





1.1 





- 


□ 


_ 


□ 


5.0 





- 


□ 


- 





1.2 



1.1 
1.1 



1.0 



1.2 



No. 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
55 
50 
50 

50 
60 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

60 
50 
60 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
60 



t 

3.0 
4.0 
3.0 
3.0 
2.8 
5.0 

3.4 
4.0 
2.7 
3.0 

2.4 

3.0 

2.5 
4.5 
3.2 
3.2 
2.8 

4.0 
3.6 
3.4 
4.3 
3.0 

3.5 
3.4 
3.1 
3.2 
2.6 

3.2 
4.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.5 
4.5 
5.0 

3.5 
3.2 
3.2 
3.0 

3.4 
2.3 

2.6 
5.0 
2.8 
4.0 
4.3 



t 

1.5 

1.2 

1.4 

1.4 

1.4 

1.5 

1.7 
1.5 

1.2 
1.2 

1.5 

2.1 
1.5 
1.5 
1.4 

1.8 
1.8 
1.7 
2.0 
1.2 



1.3 

1.6 
1.3 

1.4 
2.0 
1.2 
1.5 
1.6 
1.8 
2.0 

1.5 
1.6 
1.6 
1.5 
1.6 
1.2 

1.3 
2.2 
1.4 
1.5 



t 

0.8 

w0.7 

0.7 

0.8 



w0.8 
w0.7 



w0.7 
0.7 



w0.7 



w0.8 
w0.7 



w0.7 
w0.8 
w0.8 
w0.7 
w0.7 



w0.7 

w0.8 
w0.7 

w0.8 
w0.8 
w0.7 
w0.8 

w0.8 



w0.7 
w0.8 

w0.8 
w0.8 
w0.7 

0.8 
w0.7 
w0.7 
w0.7 



t 

1.2 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 
1.0 

1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 
1.0 

1.0 
1.0 

1.1 

1.0 

1.1 
1.1 

1.0 

1.1 
1.1 

1.0 
1.0 



1.0 
1.0 

1.1 

1.0 

1.1 
1.1 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 

1.0 



1.0 
1.0 
.1.0 

1.1 
1.1 

1.0 

1.1 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.2 



$ 

1.39 
2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.50 

1.70 
2.00 
1.39 
1.50 
0.83 

2.00 
1.11 
2.22 
2.00 
2.00 
1.11 

2.00 
1.39 
1.39 
2.00 
1.50 

1.11 
2.00 
0.83 
1.60 
2.00 

1.67 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.50 
2.25 
2.25 

1.75 
2.00 
2.00 
1.67 
2.00 
1.15 

0.83 
2.50 
2.00 
2.25 
1.39 



$ 
4.05 
4.40 
4.30 
4.30 
3.78 
5.50 

4.59 
5.00 
3.10 
3.51 
3.24 

4.50 
3.06 
5.80 
4.60 
4.60 
3.78 

5.60 
4.86 
4.59 
6.15 
3.90 

3.77 
4.30 
3.38 
4.32 
3.90 

3.96 

5.40 
3.90 
4.50 
4.95 
5.85 
6.50 

4.75 
4.80 
4.80 
4.05 
4.41 
3.55 

3.51 
6.90 
4.20 
5.00 
4.37 



9 Energy supplied through residential service at applicable rates. If separately metered the consumption to be added 
to regular energy use. 



Statement C 



215 



MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
December 31, 1967 

are subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
a minimum monthly charge 







COMMERCIAL SERVICE 


INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 




*a 

l-t 4> 


Demand Rate 












M 


per Kilowatt 

50 Cents 

Minimum 50 Cents 


Net Monthly 


£ 


Energy Rate per Kwh 


Net Monthly 


g 



Bill for 
Use of 1 Kw 




for Use of 
Each Kw of Demand 


BUI for Use 
of 1 Kw 


<Sf 


&* 


Energy Rate per 


of Demand 


a 




of Demand 


•a* 


c ** 


Kwh for Use of 




o 












*o ^ 


• - <u 


Each Kw of Demand 




& 












I-. (0 


to .*; 








First 
Block 


Second 
Block 








I* 

E 



U 


0) <-> 

= « 

u l- 
o u 

9>< 


3 

O 


s 

o 


3 

.i o 
"o 3J 


3 
O 


3 
O 


c 

E 
u 

Q 


3 

.i o 

2 = 


3 
O 


3 

o 




CflO 


X 


-K 


3-a 


X 


a 




Hours'. Use 


Hours' Use 


$1 

3-B 


X 


X 






1§ 


x© 

£2 


_Z c 
3-2 


o 

o 


o 

o 




50 100 


50 100 


o 
o 


o 

o 


# 


t 





t 


t 


$ 


$ 


$ 


t t 


t t 


* 


$ 


$ 


_ 


1.5 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.18 


— 


ttl.35 


General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 






1.2 


1.5 


°2.4 1 0.8 1 0.5 1 3.33 


3.78 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 | 0.33 


2.97 


3.27 


1.35 


1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






Genen 


1 Rate (see notes) 






1.1 


1.5 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.18 


1.2 


1.35 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.45 


3.70 


4.15 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.35 


3.50 


3.85 


- 


1.5 


2.2 


- 


0.8 


3.15 


3.87 


1.35 


2.8 


1.8 


0.33 


3.58 


3.88 


1.2 


1.5 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 


1.6 


0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.09 


1.0 


1.5 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 






General F 


..ate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






- 


- 


2.0 


- 


1.0 


3.15 


4.05 


1.20 


1.9 


1.3 


0.30 


2.79 


3.06 


- 


1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


2.1 


0.6 


0.33 


3.33 


3.63 


1.2 


- 


2.4 


0.7 


0.45 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.35 


3.50 


3.85 


- 


- 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.18 






General Rate (see notes) 






Generz 


j Rate (see notes) 






1.1 


1.5 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 1 3.87 


4.32 


1.00 


2.4 


0.5 1 0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


1.1 


1.5 


°3.3 


0.8 


0.5 4.14 


4.59 


1.00 


2.4 


0.5 1 0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


1.1 


1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






- 


1.35 


C 


.eneral F 


..ate (see notes) 






Genera 


il Rate (see notes) 






1.3 


_ 


3.0 


_ 


1.0 


4.05 


4.95 


1.35 


3.1 


2.0 


0.33 


3.81 


4.10 


1.2 


1.35 


2.3 


0.7 


0.45 


3.50 


3.95 


1.00 


1.9 


0.5 


0.35 


3.40 


3.75 




- 


2.6 


- 


0.7 


3.42 


4.05 


1.35 


2.8 


1.8 


0.33 


3.58 


3.88 


- 


1.5 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 


1.5 


0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.00 






C 


reneral F 


Late (see notes) 






Geners 


1 Rate (see notes) 






1.3 


1.5 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 


2.1 


0.5 


0.33 


3.24 


3.54 


- 


1.5 


°3.5 


0.8 


0.5 


4.32 


4.77 


1.00 


2.3 


0.5 


0.33 


3.42 


3.72 






General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






" 


- 


2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


3.70 


4.20 


1.00 


1.9 


0.5 


0.35 


3.40 


3.75 


1.2 


1.35 


2.6 


0.8 


0.45 


3.90 


4.35 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.35 


3.50 


3.85 






C 


General F 


late (see notes) 






Genera 


J Rate (see i 


lotes) 






- 


1.35 


2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


4.00 


4.50 


1.00 


2.2 


0.5 


0.35 


3.70 


4.05 


- 


1.5 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 




1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


2.2 


0.5 


0.33 


3.33 


3.63 


11 


1.35 


°2.0 


0.7 


0.45 


3.20 


3.65 


1.00 


1.5 


0.5 


0.30 


3.00 


3.30 


" 


1.5 


°2.2 


0.8 


0.5 


3.15 


3.60 


1.00 


1.3 


0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.82 


1.35 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


3.70 


4.20 


1.00 


2.0 


- 0.5 


0.35 


3.50 


3.85 


- 


1.35 


1.8 


0.7 


0.45 


3.00 


3.45 


1.00 


1.4 


0.5 


0.35 


2.90 


3.25 






General Rate (see notes) 






Genera 


J Rate (see notes) 






1 2 


- 


3.8 


1 - 


1" 


4.95 


6.03 


1.35 


2.5 


(1.6 


0.33 


3.36 


3.65 



216 



Municipal Electrical Service 



RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS FOF 

in I flc 



Rates are quoted on a monthly basis am 
(unless otherwise noted) ant 



& 2 B 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



All-Electric 

Rate 

per Kwh 



.bo 



.4, £ 

^•2 



J= .2 

35 



Rate per Kwh 
for 






4= 

x o 
« o 
2 <s 



x o 

U o 






§ 2 

so 

II 



Net Monthly 
Bill for 



Newbury 

Newcastle N 5% 



New Hamburg 

fNew Liskeard 

Newmarket . 



No. 
45 
42 



1.5 



4.0 



1.0 



Small Commercial 



Niagara .... 
Niagara Falls 

Nipigon Twp. 
North Bay . . 
North York . 



Norwich . 
Norwood 
(F) Oakville . . 
Oil Springs 
Omemee . , 



. N5% 

. N5% 
. N5% 
N10% 

N 10% 



N5% 



Orangeville N5% 

Orillia N 5% 

Orono N 5% 

Oshawa N 5% 

Ottawa N 5% 



Otterville . . . 
Owen Sound . 



N5% 



Paisley N 5% 

Palmerston N 5% 



Paris 



Parkhill 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke N 5% 

Penetanguishene . N 5% 
Perth N 5% 

Peterborough ... N 5% 

Petrolia N 5% 

Pickering 

| Pickle Lake Landing . . . 
Picton N 5% 



39 


- 


1.1 


1.1 


42 





4.0 


1.1 


38 


1.2 


1.1 


1.1 


42 


1.1 


1.1 


1.1 


44 


□ 
Small C 


o mm ere 


ial 



44 

42 

37 

38 
42 
42 
45 
45 

#43 
38 
40 
34 



32 



45 

42 

44 
42 

#42 
40 
40 

36 
45 
37 
45 
45 



□ 
D 




D 

□ 
□ 

□ 



+2.0 



1.0 
1.1 
3.0 

1.0 

4.5 



1.0 
3.0 
1.0 



1.0 
1.1 
1.0 

1.0 

1.0 



1.0 
1.0 
1.0 



□ 

1.0 1.0 
Small Commercial 
1-1- 
I 2.6 | 1.0 
Small Commercial 



1.1 



1.2 


- 


1.2 


_ 





1.1 


□/Liz 


- 





- 


□ 


- 


□ 


4.0 


□ 


— 


□ 


3.0 





4.4 


□ 


- 



1.0 



No. 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
O(60<> 
(60 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
60 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



2.8 
4.0 
4.0 
3.0 
4.0 
2.8 

3.2 
3.8 
4.0 
3.6 
3.2 
4.0 

3.5 
2.6 
4.5 
2.8 
3.4 

3.2 

2.3 

4.0 

4.0 

(2.0 

(1.0 

3.4 
2.8 
2.8 
2.6 
3.8 
4.0 
2.8 

3.2 
3.4 
4.0 
3.0 
3.3 

5.0 
3.2 
3.8 
4.4 
3.5 



t 

1.4 
1.6 
1.6 
1.5 
2.0 
1.4 

1.5 
1.8 
2.0 
1.2 
1.3 
1.6 

1.2 
1.3 
1.9 
1.4 
1.7 

1.6 

1.6 
1.2 



1.4 
1.4 
1.4 
1.2 
1.7 
2.0 



1.6 
1.7 
1.6 
1.1 
1.4 

1.5 
1.6 
1.9 

2.2 
1.4 



0.8 
w0.8 

0.9 
w0.8 
w0.8 





1.1 
1.0 
1.2 
1.2 
1.1 



w0.8 1.1 

w0.7/0.8x 1.0 

1.0 

w0.7 

w0.8 



w0.7 
0.8 

w0.8 
0.8 

w0.9 

w0.8 

w0.8 
w0.8 



w0.8 
w0.7 



w0.7 
w0.7 



0.9 

w0.8 
w0.6 
w0.7 



w0.7 
w0.8 
w0.9 
w0.7 



1.0 
1.1 
1.0 
1.1 
1.1 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
O0.5 



1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.3 

1.3 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 

1.0 
1.0 
1.1 
1.2 
1.0 



$ 
1.11 
2.00 
2.00 
1.11 
1.39 
1.40 

1.75 
2.00 
2.75 
2.00 
2.50 
2.00 

1.75 
1.11 
2.25 
0.83 

2.22 

2.00 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
0.83 



1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.50 
2.50 
0.83 

1.11 
1.67 
2.00 
1.50 
2.00 

3.00 
1.75 
1.90 
2.22 
2.00 

1.0-0 



$ 
3.78 
5.20 
5.20 
4.05 
5.40 
3.78 

4.14 
5.50 
6.00 
4.20 
4.20 
5.20 

4.15 
3.51 

6.05 
3.78 
4.59 

4.80 
3.15 
5.20 
4.40 
3.11 



4.05 
4.20 
4.20 
3.70 
5.30 
6.00 
3.73 

4.32 
4.59 
5.20 
3.70 
4.45 

5.50 
4.80 
5.13 
5.94 
4.55 



OFijrst 60 kwh of monthly consumption @ 2.O<0 next 60 kwh and all kwh in excess of 1,000 kwh <e 

t>330 per month per service when the permanently x Denotes the next 1000" kwh 

installed appliance load is under 2,000 watts and 660 + Residential electric heating first 1500 kwh at regular 

per month when 2,000 watts or more. residential rates, balance at 2.00 where total load is on 

(F)Farm Customers - Apply general rate one meter, applicable to customers so designated by the 

utility. 















Statement C 










217 


MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 








December 31, 1968 












are su 


fc/Vcf 


to 10% prompt payment discount 










a minimum 


monthly charge 














^ 


COMMERCIAL SERVICE 


INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 




06 

fa 
*a 

O* 
60 O 

C ** 


Demand Rate 














60 


per Kilowatt 


Net Monthly 


£ 


Energy Rate per Kwh 


Net Monthly 


C 


50 Cents 


Bill for 


U 


for Use of 


Bill for Use 


s 

O 

.2* 


Minimum 50 Cents 


Use of 1 Kw 
of Demand 


a 
& 

•a 


Each Kw of Demand 


of 1 
of Den 


Kw 


Energy Rate per 
Kwh for Use of 


land 










t-. u 




Each Kw of Demand 






First 
Block 


Second 
Block 








0) o. 








2 






c 


£ 






E 


4> ►« 






3 






E 






3 






o 
U 


O 0) 


3 
O 


3 

O 


.J. 


3 
O 


3 
O 


u 
Q 






.J- o 


3 

O 


3 





X 


^x 


<13 


X 


X 




Hours'. Use 


Hours' Use 


3 -a 


X 


X 






J5S 


x© 

4> 


c 
3.2 


o 
o 


o 

o 




50 100 


50 100 


J c 

3 ° 


o 
o 


o 
o 






U--i 


Z— < 


< -CJ 


<N 


m 








<V3 


<N 


m 


* 


* 





t 


t 


$ 


$ 


$ 


t 


t t 


t 


$ 


$ 


- 


- 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 


1.9 


0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


1.1 


1.35 


2.7 


0.7 


0.45 


3.90 


4.35 


1.00 


2.1 


0.5 


0.35 


3.60 


3.95 


_ 


1.5 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 


1.9 


0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


1.1 


1.5 


°3.6 


0.8 


0.5 


4.41 


4.86 


1.00 


2.4 


0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.81 


1.2 


1.5 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.33 


2.88 


3.18 


1.4 


1.5 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 


2.1 


0.5 


0.33 


3.24 


3.54 


1.1 


tt s 


2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.80 


4.30 


1.00 


1.9 


0.5 


0.33 


3.40 


3.73 






General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






ku 


&1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






|1.2 


1.35 


°2.3a 


0.7 


0.45 


3.45 


3.90 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.35 


3.20 


3.55 


1.1 


1.35 


°2.7 


0.7 


0.45 


3.90 


4.35 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.30 


3.50 


3.80 


1.1 


1.5 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 


1.6 


0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.09 


u. 


&1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






1.5 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 


2.2 


0.5 


0.33 


3.33 


3.63 


- 


1.5 


°3.2 


0.8 


0.5 


4.05 


4.50 


1.00 


2.8 


0.5 


0.33 


3.87 


4.17 






General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






- 


1.35 


1.7 1 - 1 0.7 | 2.90 


3.60 


1.00 


0.91 - 0.5 1 0.30 


2.40 


2.70 


1.2 


1.35 


°2.6 1 0.7 1 0.45 1 3.80 
General Rate (see notes) 


4.25 


1.00 


2.1 1 - 0.5 1 0.30 
General Rate (see notes) 


3.60 


3.90 




— 


2.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.30 


3.80 


1.00 


1.4 


0.5 


0.33 


2.90 


3.23 




1.5 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 


2.5 


0.5 


0.33 


3.60 


3.90 




1.35 


°1.8 


0.7 


0.45 


3.00 


3.45 


1.00 


1.1 


0.5 


0.35 


2.60 


2.95 


~ 


1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






12 


1.35 


2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.80 


4.30 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.35 


3.20 


3.55 


- 


1 5 


2.3 


- 


0.8 


3.24 


3.96 


1.00 


1.5 


1.1 


0.30 


2.34 


2.61 


1.3 


- 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 


2.2 


0.5 


0.33 


3.33 


3.63 


1.5 


1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


2.1 


0.5 


0.33 


3.24 


3.54 




1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 

General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 

1 I 

General Rate (see notes) 


















1.3 


1.35 


2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


4.20 


4.70 


1.00 


2.4 


0.6 


0.40 


4.00 


4.40 


- 


1.5 


°2.0 


0.8 


0.5 


2.97 


3.42 


1.00 


1.5 


0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.00 


1.2 


1.5 


°3.8 


0.8 


0.5 


4.59 


5.04 


1.00 


3.3 


0.5 


0.33 


4.32 


4.62 




1.35 


2.1 


0.7 


0.45 


3.30 


3.75 


1.00 


1.6 


0.5 


0.35 


3.10 


3.45 



218 



Municipal Electrical Service 



RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS FOR 

in Effect 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis and 
(unless otherwise noted) and 



> o 

a <u 
% a 



JO 

£ E 

♦J 3 

z 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



a 1 o 

Ez 



All-Electric 

Rate 

per Kwh 



.bo 

U- in 



.A ? 

•a U 

< 19 



Rate per Kwh 
for 



h o 



X o 
© o 
Z <^ 



X o 
» o 

Z </■> 



•o M 
"O —I 

<1 

^•2 



§ 2 

so 

E J 
cU 



Net Monthly 
Bill for 



Plantagenet . . 
Plattsville . . . 
Point Edward 

Port Arthur . 
PortBurwell . 



N5% 
N5%j 
N5% 



fPort Carling 

Port Colborne ... N 5% 
Port Credit N 5% 



Port Dover 
Port Elgin 



Port Hope N 5% 

Port McNicoll ... N 5% 

Port Perry N 5% 

Port Rowan 

Port Stanley N 5% 



fPowassan 

Prescott 

Preston N 5% 



Priceville 

Princeton N 5% 



Queenston 

Rainy River 

Red Lake Twp 

Red Rock N 5% 

Renfrew 



Richmond 

Richmond Hill . N 10% 

Ridgetown N 5% 

Ripley 

Rockland N 5% 



Rockwood N 5% 

Rodney N 5% 

Rosseau N 5% 

Russell N 5% 

St. Catharines ... N 5% 



No. 

■#43 
42 
38 

38 
45 

41 
41 
40 

49 
44 

D40 

44 

- 45 

50 

45 



4.0 



i 

1.0 



1.0 



1.0 

Small Commercial 
1.1 

1.2 



1.2 


A 





1.2 


1.22 


_ 


□ 


2.0 





zl.O 



1.0 
zl.O 
Small Commercial 

□ 1.1 1.1 

□ 1.2 1.2 

□ 1.0 1.0 
Small Commercial 


□ 
1.2 
□ 
Small Commercial 



1.22 

1.1 

□ 



1.1 
2.6 
Small Commercial 



□ 


- 


□ 


- 


1.1 


_ 





5.0 





4.4 





- 


1.1 


- 


1.2 


1.1 





1.0 


- 


1.0 


□ 


- 


a 


- 



1.1 

1.2 



1.1 
1.0 
1.0 



Small Commercial 

□ I 4.0 I 1.0 
Imall Commercial 



2.0 



1.0 



1.0 



1.0 



No. 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



4.0 
2.7 
3.0 
4.0 
4.0 
4.4 

4.4 
3.5 
3.5 
4.0 
2.8 
3.2 

3.2 
3.2 
2.6 
4.0 
3.0 
4.0 
4.0 

3.6 

2.4 
3.2 
3.2 
4.0 

2.2 

2.6 
5.0 
4.4 
3.6 
2.6 

3.0 
3.4 
3.0 
2.8 
4.0 
4.0 

4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
3.0 
3.0 
4.0 



t 

2.0 

1.1 

1.5 

2.0 

1.2 

2.2 

2.2 
1.6 
1.5 
1.5 
1.4 
1.6 

1.5 
1.7 
1.2 
1.4 
1.4 
1.5 
1.5 

1.8 
1.2 
1.6 
1.6 
2.0 
1.1 

1.3 
2.1 
2.2 
1.2 
1.3 

1.3 
1.2 
1.5 
1.4 
1.5 
2.0 

1.7 
1.7 
1.4 
1.3 
1.3 
1.3 



i 

w0.7 
w0.7 

w0.7 

w0.6 
w0.8 

w0.8 
w0.7 

w0.7 

w0.8 
0.9 

w0.7 

w0.7 
w0.7 
w0.8 



w0.8 
w0.6 
w0.8 



w0.7 



w0.7 

w0.9 

w0.6 

0.7 

w0.7 
w0.7 
w0.7 
0.8 
w0.7 



w0.8 

w0.7 
w0.7 
w0.8 
w0.7 



t 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.3 
0.9 
1.2 

1.2 
1.0 
1.0 
1.2 
1.1 
1.3 

1.0 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 
1.0 
1.2 

1.1 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.2 
1.0 

0.8 
1.1 
1.2 
1.0 
1.0 

1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 



$ 

2.00 
1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.78 

3.33 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 

2.22 
2.00 

2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.22 
2.00 
2.00 

1.67 
1.67 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
1.50 

0.83 
2.50 
2.22 
2.00 
1.11 

1.50 
1.70 
1.50 
1.39 
2.00 
2.00 

2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
2.00 

1.75 
2.00 



$ 

6.00 
3.55 
4.50 
6.00 
3.96 
5.94 

5.94 
4.95 
4.75 
5.00 
3.78 
4.32 

4.60 
5.00 
3.70 
4.80 
3.87 
5.00 
5.00 

4.86 
3.24 
4.80 
4.80 
5.40 
3.30 

3.51 
6.03 
5.94 
4.20 
3.51 

3.69 
4.10 
4.50 
3.78 
5.00 
6.00 

5.40 
5.40 
4.80 
4.10 
4.10 
4.60 



A First 1750 kwh regular residential rates. 

Q Applicable to present residential and future commercial customers only. 


















Statement C 










219 


MUNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 








December 31, 1968 












i 

are su 


bject to 10% prompt payment discount 










a minimum 


monthly charge 
















COMMERCIAL SERVICE 






INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 








Demand Rate 














H 


per Kilowatt 

50 Cents 

Minimum 50 Cents 


Net Monthly 


£ 


Energy Rate per Kwh 


Net Monthly 


c 


So 


Bill for 


U 


for Use of 


Bill for Use 


'2. 



O 1-, 


Use of 1 Kw 
of Demand 


a 


Each Kw of Demand 


of 1 
of Den 


Kw 


Energy Rate per 


land 


c *■' 


Kwh for Use of 






« 














Each Kw of Demand 






06 












!:: w 


w .i 








T3 


First 


Second 








I 


Xg 






g 






C 


Block 


Block 


2 






E 


o <-> 






3 






E 






3 






a 




3 
o 


3 

O 


•i o 


3 

O 


3 
O 


a 






.i o 

2B 


3 
O 


3 

O 




oo c- 


^DG 


«-■■ 


3 -a 


X 


X 




Hours'.Use 


Hours' Use 


5 -a 


ac 


X 






.§§ 


x© 


c 
3-2 


o 
o 


o 
o 




50 100 


50 100 


J c 

3 ° 


o 
o 


o 
o 






U.-H 


Z-h 


< ■£ 


<N 


CO 








<•& 


rs 


CO 


t 


* 


t 


i 


t 


$ 


$ 


$ 


t t 


t t 


t 


$ 


$ 


- 


#1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 






r 


1.35 


2.3 1 0.8 1 0.5 3.60 
General Rate (see notes) 


4.10 


1.00 


1.61 - 0.5 1 0.35 
General Rate (see notes) 


3.10 


3.45 


- 


1.5 


°3.4 


0.8 


0.5 


4.23 


4.68 


1.00 


2.5 


0.5 | 0.33 


3.60 


3.90 


1.6 


1.5 


4.2 


0.8 


0.5 


4.95 


5.40 


1.00 


2.7 


0.5 1 0.33 


3.78 


4.08 


ll.2 


#1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






- 


#1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






1.1 


1.5 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 


1.6 


0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.09 


1.2 


1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


2.2 


0.5 


0.33 


3.33 


3.63 


- 


1.35 


2.2 


0.7 


0.45 


3.40 


3.85 


1.00 


1.7 


0.5 


0.35 


3.20 


3.55 






General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






ft 1.2 


#1.35 


General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






1 *" 


1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 


0.5 


3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


2.3 


0.5 


0.33 


3.42 


3.72 


( " 


1.35 


2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.90 


4.40 


1.00 


2.1 


0.5 


0.40 


3.60 


4.00 


1.1 


1.5 


°3.4 


0.8 


0.5 


4.23 


4.68 


1.00 


2.7 


0.5 


0.33 


3.78 


4.08 


1.1 


1.5 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 


1.5 


0.5 


0.33 


2.70 


3.00 


1.2 


1.35 


2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.80 


4.30 


1.00 


1.5 


0.5 


0.35 


3.00 


3.35 




_ 


3.8 


0.8 


0.5 


4.59 


5.04 


1.00 


2.9 


0.5 


0.33 


3.96 


4.26 






General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








_ 


°2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


3.33 


3.78 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 


1.3 


1.5 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 


2.5 


0.5 


0.33 


3.60 


3.90 


1.2 


1.5 


°3.8 


0.8 


0.5 


4.59 


5.04 


1.00 


3.3 


0.5 


0.33 


4.32 


4.62 






General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








1.5 


°1.8 


0.8 


0.5 


2.79 


3.24 


1.00 


1.2 


0.5 


0.33 


2.43 


2.73 




_ 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 


1.9 


0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.36 


1.2 


1.35 


°2.0 


0.7 


0.45 


3.20 


3.65 


1.00 


1.4 


0.5 


0.30 


2.90 


3.20 




1.35 


2.4 


0.8 


0.5 


3.70 


4.20 


1.00 


- 1.9 


0.6 


0.40 


3.50 


3.90 


- 


- 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 






General F 


.ate (see 


notes) 






Genei 


•al Rate (see nc 


)tes) 






1.2 


1.35 


2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.80 


4.30 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.35 


3.50 


3.85 






General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 










General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 










General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 






11 


1.35 


( 


General F 


late (see 


notes) 






Gene 


ral Rate (see n< 


)tes) 







220 



Municipal Electrical Service 

RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS FOl 

in Effe< 



Rotes are quoted on a monthly basis an 
(unless otherwise noted) an 



o 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



All-Electric 

Rate 

per Kwh 



.bo 



< a 



53 



Rate per Kwh 
for 



fcu o 



X o 

U o 
Z <N 



X o 
Z <o 



.4, £ 

<1 



so 

1 1 

a * 

s 



Net Monthly 
Bill for 



St. Clair Beach 



N5< 



St. George N 5% 

St. Jacobs 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas N 10% 

Sandwich West Twp.N 5% 



t No. 
-#42 

- 44 

- 42 
S39 

- 40 



Sarnia 



N5% 



Scarborough 

Schreiber Twp. . . N 5% 
Seaforth N 5% 



Shelburne 
Simcoe . . 



N5% 



Sioux Lookout 
Smiths Falls . 
Southampton . 



South Grimsby Twp. N ' 

j South Porcupine 

South River 

Springfield N 5% 



Stayner 



N 10% 



Stirling 

Stoney Creek 
Stouffville . 
Stratford . . . 
Strathroy . . 



N5% 
N5% 



Streetsville 

Sturgeon Falls ... N 5% 



Sudbury . . 
Sunderland 
Sundridge . 



N5% 



Sutton 

Tara 

Tavistock N 5% 

Tecumseh N 5% 

Teeswater 



Terrace Bay Twp. 
Thamesford . . . 
Thamesville . . . 

Thedford 

Thessalon 



#41 

40 

37 

#41 
36 

43 
45 

49 
40 
45 

- 44 
42 
45 
41 

41 

38 
45 
39 
42 

37 

43 
44 

32 
40 
43 

45 
41 

39 

#41 
42 

36 
45 
45 
45 
48 



□ 
□ 
□ 
1.1 
□ 

□ 

□ 



3.5 

zl.O 

1.1 

1.0 

4.0 
2.0 



t 

1.0 

zl.O 

1.1 

1.0 

1.0 
1.0 



Small Commercial 



3.33 



2.0 



1.11 



1.0 



□ 

zl.O zl.O 
Small Commercial 
□ 

1.1 



□ 



5.0 



D 

1.22 

□ 

Small Commercial 




1.1 



1.1 



□ 

1.1 



— 


1.1 


1.1 


3.0 


3.0 


1.1 


1.1 



1.1 
1.1 

1.0 
1.0 



1.2 1.1 1.1 
□ 1.1 1.1 

Small Commercial 



1.1 
□ 



□ 

□ 
□ 

1.3 

□ 
□ 
□ 



1.0 



3.5 



1.11 
1.1 



1.2 



1.0 



1.0 



1.11 
1.1 



1.2 



No. 
50 
50 
60 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



t 

4.5 
2.5 
3.0 
3.0 

3.5 

4.5 

3.7 

4.0 

3.89 

3.0 

4.0 

2.8 
2.4 
2.5 
4.0 
3.0 
3.2 

3.5 
3.4 
5.0 
4.0 
4.0 
2.4 

2.8 
3.6 
3.4 
4.0 
4.0 

4.0 
3.5 
4.0 
3.0 
2.6 
2.8 

4.0 
2.6 
3.5 
4.5 
2.6 

2.6 
3.7 
2.8 
3.0 
4.0 



t 

1.5 

1.1 

1.5 
1.5 

2.1 

1.6 

1.8 

1.67 

1.2 

1.4 

1.4 
1.1 
1.2 
1.5 
1.5 



1.2 
1.7 
2.5 
1.3 
1.5 
1.2 

1.4 
1.6 
1.6 
1.8 
1.4 

1.3 
1.6 
1.6 

1.2 
1.3 
1.4 

1.7 
1.3 
1.1 
1.5 
1.3 

1.3 
1.5 
1.4 
1.5 
2.0 



w0.8 
w0.7 

0.9 
w0.7 

w0.7 
w0.65 



w0.7 
0.7 



0.8 
w0.7 



w0.9 
w0.8 



w0.7 
w0.8 
w0.8 
w0.7 

w0.7 

0.8 
w0.8 
w0.7 

0.8 

w0.7 
w0.8 

w0.7 

0.7 

w0.8 

w0.7 

0.8 

w0.6 

w0.8 

0.8 



w0.8 

0.8 

w0.8 

w0.8 



1.0 
1.0 
1.1 
1.2 
1.0 

1.0 

1.0 

1.0 

1.11 

1.0 

1.0 

1.1 

1.0 
1.0 
1.2 
1.1 
1.1 

1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.1 
1.0 

1.1 
1.1 
1.1 

1.0 
1.0 

1.1 
1.1 

1.2 
1.0 
1.1 
1.1 

1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.1 

0.9 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.2 



$ 
2.25 
1.50 
0.83 
1.39 
1.75 

2.25 
2.00 
2.00 
2.22 
2.00 
2.00 

1.11 
1.50 
1.80 
2.00 
1.50 
1.11 

1.75 
1.39 
2.22 
2.00 
2.00 
1.20 

1.11 
2.00 
1.70 
2.00 
2.00 

2.00 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
1.11 
2.22 

2.00 
1.11 

1.75 
2.25 
1.11 

1.67 
2.00 
0.83 
1.67 

2.22 



$ 

5.25 
3.45 
3.50 
4.05 
4.75 

6.45 
5.05 
5.60 
4.76 
3.90 
4.80 

3.78 
3.40 
3.65 
4.50 
4.05 
3.42 

4.15 
4.59 
6.75 
4.60 
5.00 
3.60 

3.78 
4.50 
4.41 
5.60 
4.80 

4.14 
4.95 
5.20 
3.90 
3.51 
3.78 

4.86 
3.51 
3.95 
5.25 
3.51 

3.51 
4.36 
3.78 
4.05 
5.40 



Statement C 



221 



UNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 

December 31, 1967 



ire subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
i minimum monthly charge 














COMMERCIAL SERVICE 




INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 




a* 

60 O 

c ** 


Demand Rate 

per Kilowatt 

50 Cents 

Minimum 50 Cents 


Net Monthly 

Bill for 
Use of 1 Kw 
of Demand 


D. 

u 

2, 

c 

i 

a 


Energy Rate per Kwh 

for Use of 
Each Kw of Demand 


Net Mc 

Billfo 

of 1 

of Der 


nthly 
rUse 
Kw 




Energy Rate per 

Kwh for Use of 

Each Kw of Demand 


nand 


First Second 
Block Block £ 

3 

.i o 

Hours'.Use Hours' Use ^ -% 

50 100 50 100 = o 

<. -^ 




J 


3 
O 

£2 


3 
O 

xo 


3 

.i o 
T3 _ 


3 
O 

X 
o 
o 


3 
O 

DC 

o 
o 


3 
O 

o 
o 

C-4 


3 
O 

X 
o 
o 

m 




JH.35 

1.35 




G 
G 

2.5 
°2.5 
°2.1 


eneral 1 
eneral ] 

0.8 
0.7 


late (see 
late (see i 

1.0 

0.5 

0.45 


$ 

iotes) 
iotes) 
3.60 

3.42 
3.30 


$ 

4.50 
3.87 
3.75 


$ 

1.20 
1.00 
1.00 


i 4 t i t 

General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 
1.7 - 1.2 - 0.30 

1.5 - 0.5 0.33 

1.6 - 0.5 0.30 


$ 

2.65 
2.70 
3.10 


$ 

2.92 
3.00 
3.40 


' 


_ 


C 
2.7 


ieneral 
0.8 


Rate (see 
0.5 


iotes) 
4.00 


4.50 


S1.00 


General Rate (see notes) 
1.9 - 0.5 0.35 


3.40 


3.75 


.2 


1.5 
1.35 


°2.6 
C 
C 


0.9 
reneral 
reneral 


0.5 
Rate (see 
late (see 


3.60 
iotes) 
iotes) 


4.05 


1.00 


2.0 - 0.6 0.39 
General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 


3.24 


3.59 


.1 


1.35 


°2.2 
1.7 


0.8 
0.8 


0.5 
0.5 


3.15 
3.00 


3.60 
3.50 


1.00 
1.00 


1.5 - 0.5 0.33 
1.2 - 0.6 0.40 


2.70 
2.80 


3.00 
3.20 


.2 
.1 


1.5 
1.5 
1.5 


3.5 

°2.0 

2.9 


0.8 
0.8 


0.5 
0.5 
1.1 


4.32 
2.97 
4.05 


4.77 
3.42 
5.04 


1.00 
1.00 
1.35 


2.4 - 0.5 0.33 

1.4 - 0.5 0.33 

2.2 - 1.4 - 0.33 


3.51 
2.61 
3.13 


3.81 
2.91 
3.43 


.1 

.2 


1.5 
1.5 


General Rate (see 
°3.3 1 0.8 1 0.5 
°4.5 ' 0.8 1 0.5 

General Rate (see 


notes) 
4.14 
5.22 

notes) 


4.59 
5.67 


1.00 
1.00 


General Rate (see notes) 

2.4 - 0.5 0.33 

3.5 - 0.5 0.33 
General Rate (see notes) 


3.51 
4.50 


3.81 
4.80 


.0 


1.35 


°1.8 


0.7 


0.45 


3.00 


3.45 


1.00 


1.3 - 0.5 0.30 


2.80 


3.10 


.2 
.3 

• 


1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

1.35 


°2.2 
°2J 
°2.5 

( 
°2.5 


0.8 
0.8 
0.8 
General 
0.7 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
Rate (see 
0.45 


3.15 
3.60 
3.42 
notes) 

3.70 


3.60 
4.05 

3.87 

4.15 


1.00 
1.00 
1.00 

1.00 


1.3 - 0.5 0.33 
2.0 - 0.5 0.33 
2.0 - 0.5 0.33 
General Rate (see notes) 
2.0 - 0.5 0.30 


2.52 
3.15 
3.15 

3.50 


2.82 
3.45 
3.45 

3.80 


2 


1.5 

1 35 


2.6 

2.5 


0.8 
0.7 


0.5 
0.45 


3.51 

3.70 


3.96 
4.15 


1.00 
1.00 


1.7 - 0.5 0.33 
2.1 - 0.5 0.35 


2.88 
3.60 


3.18 
3.95 


.1 

4 


1.35 

1.5 

1.5 


2.2 
°2.3 
°2.4 


0.7 
0.8 
0.8 


0.45 

0.5 

0.5 


3.40 
3.24 

3.33 


3.85 
3.69 

3.78 


1.00 
1.00 
1.00 


1.5 - 0.5 0.30 

1.8 - 0.5 0.33 

1.9 - 0.5 0.33 


3.00 
2.97 
3.06 


3.30 
3.27 
3.36 


1 


1.5 
1.5 

S1.35 
1.5 


°2.6 

°2.4 
( 
( 

°2.3 


0.8 

0.8 

General 

General 

0.8 


0.5 

0.5 
Rate (see 
Rate (see 

0.5 


3.51 

3.33 

notes) 

notes) 

3.24 


3.96 
3.78 

3.69 


1.00 
1.00 

1.00 


2.2 - 0.5 0.33 
1.9 - 0.5 0.33 
General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 
1.8 - 0.5 0.33 


3.33 
3.06 

2.97 


3.63 
3.36 

3.27 


4 
.1 


1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 


°2.2 
°2.8 
°2.3 
°3.0 
°3.8 


0.8 
0.8 
0.8 
0.8 
0.8 


0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 
0.5 


3.15 
3.69 

3.24 
3.87 
4.59 


3.60 
4.14 
3.69 

4.32 
5.04 


1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1.00 


1.7 - 0.5 0.33 
2.3 - 0.5 0.33 
1.7 - 0.5 0.33 
2.3 - 0.5 0.33 
3.2 - 0.5 0.33 


2.88 

3.42 
2.88 
3.42 
4.23 


3.18 
3.72 
3.18 
3.72 
4.53 



222 



Municipal Electrical Service 



RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS I 

in 



Rates are quoted on a monthly basis ■ 
(unless otherwise noted) id 






« O 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 



a 8 



All-Electric 

Rate 

per Kwh 






^•2 



00 



a 

8 

I! 



Rate per Kwh 
for 



J3 
X o 

4) O 


X o 

4) o 


* 


* 


1.6 


w0.8 


1.6 


1.0 


2.0 


w0.8 


1.2 


w0.7 


2.1 


w0.8 


1.5 


0.9 


1.5 


0.8 


1.7 


w0.8 


1.7 


w0.8 


1.3 


0.8 


1.2 


0.7 


1.2 


- 


1.2 


w0.7 


1.3 


w0.7 


1.5 


- 


1.1 


w0.6 


1.5 


w0.7 


1.4 


w0.7 


1.3 


0.8 


1.3 


w0.7 


1.3 


- 


1.2 


w0.8 


1.8 


w0.7 


1.8 


_ 


1.6 


w0.7 


2.2 


- 


1.6 


w0.8 


1.6 


w0.7 


1.4 


0.8 






5 « 

§2 
so 
6 & 

M 

go 



Net Monthly 
BiU for 



4= 
*4 




O 


o 

o 


$ 


$ 


4.90 


6.90 


4.32 


6.57 


5.40 


7.20 


4.10 


5.85 


5.58 


7.38 


4.05 


6.07 


4.05 


5.85 


4.59 


6.39 


4.59 


6.39 


4.19 


7.34 


3.51 


5.31 


3.70 


5.45 


3.70 


6.20 


3.24 


4.81 


4.35 


6.10 


4.75 


7.25 


3.30 


4.80 


5.25 


7.00 


4.50 


6.25 


3.51 


5.31 


4.10 


5.85 


4.10 


6.60 


4.15 


6.15 


5.60 


7.35 


4.86 


7.33 


5.20 


6.95 


6.65 


9.15 


4.41 


6.21 


5.20 


6.95 


3.78 


5.58 



Thornbury N 5% 

Thorndale 

f Thornloe 

Thornton N 5% 

Thorold 

Tilbury 

Tillsonburg 

f Timmins 

f Schumacher 

Toronto 

Tottenham 

Trenton N 5% 

Tweed 

Uxbridge N 5% 

Vankleek Hill . . N 10% 
Vaughan Twp. ... N 5% 

Victoria Harbour . N 5% 

Walkerton 

Wallaceburg N 5% 

Wardsville N 5% 

Wark worth N 5% 

Wasaga Beach 

Waterdown N 5% 

Waterford 

Waterloo N 5% 

Watford 



38 



No. 
42 
42 
42 

40 

45 
40 

42 
42 

43 

38 

37 
44 

37 
42 

49 

41 

45 
41 

42 




1.2 
1.39 




1.2 

D 


1.22 

□ 





3.4 



1.1 
1.1 
1.1 



1.22 



1.0 



1.1 
1.1 
1.1 

1.22 





Small Commercial 

1.1 I - I - 

□I 1.0 | 1.0 

Small Commercial 

1.0 

1.0 






1.0 


- 


2.0 





_ 


□ 


- 





- 



Small Commercial 
□ 

3.2 



3.2 



Small Commercial 



45 





1.1 


1.1 


40 





3.0 


1.0 


45 


□ 


- 


- 



No. 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
60 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



t 

3.4 
3.2 
4.0 
3.4 
4.0 

3.0 

3.0 

3.4 

3.4 

3.33 

2.6 

2.6 
2.6 
2.4 
3.5 
3.5 
2.2 
4.5 

3.4 
2.6 
3.0 
3.0 
3.5 
4.0 

3.6 
4.0 
4.5 
3.4 
4.0 
2.8 



1.0 
1.4 
1.1 
1.0 
1.2 

1.2 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
1.4 
1.1 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 

1.1 
1.1 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 

1.1 

1.0 
1.0 

1.1 

1.0 

1.1 



$ 

2.00 

1.11 

1.39 
1.70 

2.22 

0.83 
1.67 
1.39 
1.39 

2.22 
1.39 

1.50 
1.50 
1.50 
2.00 
2.00 
1.50 
2.25 

2.00 
1.11 
1.50 
1.50 
1.75 
2.00 

1.67 
2.00 
2.50 
2.22 
2.50 
1.11 






ir System -owned 

First 400 watts $2.90 per month 

Each 100 watts additional 40< /month for element 

ratings above 400 watts, plus a monthly charge for 

larger tank sizes as follows: 
30f for 1,000-watt and 1,200-watt 
40tf for 1,500-watt 
50tf for 2,000-watt and 2,500-watt 
550 for heaters 3,000-watts and over 
"Cascade 40" - 1000/3000-watt elements - $5.82 per 

month 

Other installation 

1000/1000 watt elements - $5.60/month 
1500/1500 watt elements - 7.70/month 
1500/4500 watt elements - 8.03/month 
2000/2000 watt elements - 9.80/month 
2000/6000 watt elements - 10.24/month 



if Customer-owned 

The following rates are applicable to energy 
$1.98/month for the first 400 watts plus 
incremental charge of 400/month per 100 wati 
element ratings above 400 watts. 

For installations consisting of dual elements the 
monthly charges are as follows: 

"Cascade 40" - 1000/3000-watt elements - $4.6 

month 

Other installations 

1000/1000 watt elements - $4.38/month 
1500/1500 watt elements - 6.39/month 
1500/4500 watt elements - 6.72/month 
2000/2000 watt elements - 8.39/month 
2000/6000 watt elements - 8.83/month 



Statement C 



223 



1UNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 
>ecember 31, 1967 

re subject to 10% prompt payment discount 
minimum monthly charge 







«> 


COMMERCIAL SERVICE 






INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 




rt 


Demand Rate 














H 




per Kilowatt 
50 Cents 


NetM 


onthly 


£ 


Energy Rate per Kwh 


Net Monthly 


C 


5 J2 


Bill for 


X 


for Use of 


Bill for Use 


2. 




Minimum 50 Cents 


Use of 1 Kw 
of Demand 


a 

a 


Each Kw of Demand 


of IK 
of Dem 


„w 


75 s^ 


Energy Rate per 
Kwh for Use of 


and 












' — 1> 


Each Kw of Demand 






CC 












|| 


w .2: 








*o 


First 
Block 


Second 
Block 














£ 






c 


2 








E 








3 






H 






3 










U 




3 
O 


3 
O 


.i o 


3 

O 


3 

O 


a 






.i o 

•OK 


3 
O 


3 
O 






(a5 


~ X 


,-SE 


<•«! 


X 


X 




Hours'.Use 


Hours' Use 




ac 


X 








•HO 


xo 


c 

5-2 


o 
o 


o 
o 




50 100 


50 100 


5 2 


o 
o 


o 
o 








U.— 


Z— < 


< -Z 


<N 


ro 








<~ 


rs 


m 




* 


* 


t 


t 


t 


$ 


$ 


$ 


* t 


t t 


* 


$ 


$ 




1.45 




General Rate (see 


notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








- 


°2.7 


0.8 1 0.5 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 


1.91 - 0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.36 




l.l 


1.5 


°3.6 


0.8 1 0.5 


4.41 


4.86 


1.00 


2.41 - 0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.81 










General Rate (see 


notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








1.3 


1.5 


3.3 


0.8 


0.5 


4.14 


4.59 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 




_ 


_ 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 


1.9 


0.5 


0.33 


3.06 


3.36 






1.5 


°2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.42 


3.87 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 




l.l 


1.5 


°3.3 


0.8 


0.5 


4.14 


4.59 


1.00 


2.4 


0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.81 




1.1 


1.5 


°3.3 


0.8 


0.5 


4.14 


4.59 


1.00 


2.4 


0.5 


0.33 


3.51 


3.81 




1.33 


1.5 


b2.3 


0.8 


0.6 


3.78 


4.32 


1.10 


2.1 


0.55 


0.38 


3.37 


3.72 




1.5 


1.5 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 


2.1 


0.5 


0.33 


3.24 


3.54 




1.1 


1.35 


1.9 


0.7 


0.45 


3.10 


3.55 


1.00 


1.3 


0.5 


0.35 


2.80 


3.15 




1.0 


1.5 


"1.9 


0.8 


0.5 


2.88 


3.33 


1.00 


1.3 


0.5 


0.33 


2.52 


2.82 




1.1 


1.35 


2.6 


0.7 


0.45 


3.80 


4.25 


1.00 


2.1 


0.5 


0.35 


3.60 


3.95 




1.2 


1.35 


°1.5 


0.7 


0.45 


2.70 


3.15 


1.00 


1.0 


0.5 


0.30 


2.50 


2.80 










General Rate (see 


notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 
I 










1.45 




1 
General Rate (see 


notes) 






1 
General Rate (see notes) 










1.5 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 


1.4 


0.5 


0.33 


2.61 


2.91 




10 


1.35 


1.9 


0.7 


0.5 


3.10 


3.60 


1.00 


1.6 


0.5 


0.35 


3.10 


3.45 










General Rate (see 


notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 














General Rate (see 


notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








- 


- 


°3.0 


0.8 


0.5 


3.87 


4.32 


1.00 


2.5 


0.5 


0.33 


3.60 


3.90 




- 


- 


2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.60 


4.10 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.35 


3.50 


3.85 




11 


1.5 


°2.9 


0.8 


0.5 


3.78 


4.23 


1.00 


2.2 


0.5 


0.33 


3.33 


3.63 




l 2 


1.35 


2.5 


0.8 


0.5 


3.80 


4.30 


1.00 


2.0 


0.5 


0.40 


3.50 


3.90 




1.1 


- 


°2.7 


0.8 


0.5 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 


2.2 


0.5 


0.33 


3.33 


3.63 



* Maximum $5.50 per month 
b Demand rate $ 1 . 1 per kw 



224 



Municipal Electrical Service 

RATES AND TYPICAL BILLS F< 

in Effe 

Rates are quoted on a monthly basis 
(unless otherwise noted) 



2* 



OS a«5 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 






All-Electric 

Rate 

per Kwh 






3? 



S3 

55 



Rate per Kwh 
for 



8 
u- o 



X o 
o o 



X o 

U O 

Z«7> 



.J. £ 
■a us 

Si 

35 



SO 



Net Monthly 
BiU for 







o 

WO 


© 

o 


$ 


$ 


4.25 


6.00 


6.25 


8.00 


4.80 


6.55 


6.00 


8.50 


4.80 


6.55 


3.55 


5.30 


4.05 


5.85 


3.55 


5.13 


4.40 


6.15 


5.00 


7.00 


9.85 


12.10 


3.80 


5.55 


3.51 


5.31 


3.90 


5.65 


4.32 


6.57 


5.25 


7.00 


3.24 


4.81 


3.78 


5.58 


5.20 


6.95 


3.80 


5.30 


3.85 


5.60 


3.85 


6.35 


3.50 


5.75 


4.05 


6.75 



Waubaushene ... N 5% 

Webbwood N 5% 

Welland N 5% 

Wellesley N 5% 

Wellington N 5% 

West Lome 

Westport 

Wheatley N 5% 

Whitby N 5% 

fWhite River 

Wiarton N 5% 

Williamsburg 

Winchester N 5% 

Windermere 

Windsor N 5% 

Wingham 

Woodbridge 

Woodstock N 5% 

Woodville N 5% 

Wyoming N 5% 

York N 5% 

Zurich 



t No. 

- 47 

- 43 

- 42 

- 42 

- 41 

- 43 

- 38 

- 45 

- 40 

- 60 

- 43 

- 45 

- 43 

45 - 
*40 

- 43 

- 42 
-S38 

- 42 

- 45 





□ 3.0 
1.0 2.0 
Small Commercial 
1.0 



1.0 
1.0 



□ 

D 


1.6 


_ 


1.1 


1.2 


1.1 


□ 


- 


1.2 


3.0 





- 





_ 


□ 


- 


□ 


- 


□ 


- 


D 


2.5 


□ 


_ 


1.2 


- 





2.5 





— 


D 


- 



1.1 
1.1 



1.0 



1.0 



1.0 



Small Commercial 



1.2 
□ 



zl.O 
1.2 



zl.O 
1.2 



No. 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
60 



4 

3.3 
4.5 
3.2 
4.0 
4.0 
2.7 

3.0 
2.7 
4.0 
4.0 

7.5 

2.8 
2.6 
3.0 

3.2 
4.5 

2.4 
2.8 
4.0 
3.2 
2.9 
2.9 

2.6 
3.7 



t 

1.3 
2.0 
1.6 
2.0 
1.4 
1.1 

1.5 
1.3 
1.2 
1.5 
3.6 

1.2 
1.3 
1.2 
1.6 
1.5 

1.2 
1.4 
1.6 
1.1 
1.2 
1.2 

1.1 



t 
w0.7 
w0.7 
w0.7 
l.Ox 
w0.7 
w0.7 

w0.8 
w0.7 
w0.7 
w0.8 
wl.O 

w0.7 
w0.8 
w0.7 
1.0 
w0.7 

0.7 

0.8 

w0.7 

w0.6 

w0.7 



t 

1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.6 
1.0 
1.0 

1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.33 

1.0 
1.1 
1.0 
1.4 
1.0 

1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 
1.0 

0.9 
1.2 



$ 
2.00 
2.25 
1.75 
2.50 
2.00 
1.50 

1.11 
1.50 
2.00 
3.00 

3.75 

2.00 
1.30 
1.50 
1.67 

2.25 

1.11 
0.83 
2.00 
1.60 
1.75 
1.75 

2.00 
0.83 



Applicable to General-rate customers only. 



NOTES: 

All-electric Service 

Applicable where electricity is the sole source of energy in 
the residence, including all-electric house heating and 
electric water heating supplied through a single meter. 

House Heating 

Applicable where electric energy is used to heat an entire 
dwelling, or any part of a dwelling in excess of 25% of the 
floor area. 



□ Energy supplied through residential service meter at 

applicable rates. 
Energy metered separately at end residential rate, or 

energy supplied through residential service meter at 

applicable rates. 
§ Farm customers billed at standard rural rates. 
§§ Farm customers billed at special rates. 
# Applicable only to customers now being served, 
o Commercial service customers with connected load of 

under 5 kilowatts billed at residential rates. 
f Retail service provided by The Hydro-Electric Power 

Commission of Ontario. 



Demand rate 45 # per kw 

Rates are net (Subject to 5% or 10% delayed payn 
charge). 

Special rates OR if standard rates shown, special 
are available to selected categories. 

Special rate for metered water-heating service 
When loads are subject to central control, these 
may be somewhat lower. 
Applicable for single metered apartment blocks or 
Denotes the next 1000 kwh. 

















Statement C 










225 




1UNICIPAL ELECTRICAL SERVICE 










>ece 

<-e su 


mber 31, 1968 












1 


bject to 10% prompt payment discount 












minimum monthly charge 














^ COMMERCIAL SERVICE 


INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 






a 


Demand Rate 
















60 


•> S3 


per Kilowatt 

50 Cents 

Minimum 50 Cents 


Net Monthly 


? 


Energy Rate per Kwh 


Net Monthly 




c 
3 



.e 


8.BJ 


Bill for 
Use of 1 Kw 
of Demand 


u 


for Use of 
Each Kw of Demand 


Bill foi 

of 1 

of Den 


Use 

Kw 




Energy Rate per 


land 




13^ 


60 O 


Kwh for Use of 






13 














'o hi 




Each Kw of Demand 






pi 














^ w 


W .— 








T3 


First 


Second 










P 








2 






C 


Block 


Block 


■e 








6 

c5 


s 
o 


3 
O 


3 
.J. o 

TDK 


«5 

3 
O 


3 
O 


E 
a 






3 


3 
O 


3 

o 






wc 


X 


♦*3C 


"0 — . 
<73 


as 


X 




Hours'.Use 


Hours' Use 


<T3 


X 


X 










x© 


_J c 

3-2 


o 
o 


o 

o 




50 100 


50 100 


3-S 


o 
o 


o 
o 




t 


* 


t 


i 


t 


$ 


$ 


$ 


t t 


t t 


* 


$ 


$ 










General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 














General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








.0 


1.35 




General Rate (see notes) 

1 1 
General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 


















1 
General Rate (see notes) 














General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 










1.5 


°2.6 


0.8 


0.5 


3.51 


3.96 


1.00 


2.1 


0.5 


0.33 


3.24 


3.54 






- 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 










General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








2 


1.35 




General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








6 


1.5 


°5.8 


0.8 | 0.5 1 6.39 


6.84 


1.00 


5.1| - 0.5 1 0.33 


5.94 


6.24 




- 


1.35 




General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 










1.5 


°2.4 


0.8 1 0.5 | 3.33 
General Rate (see notes) 


3.78 


1.00 


2.4| - 0.5 | 0.33 
General Rate (see notes) 


3.51 


3.81 




_ 


1.5 


°2.8 


0.8 | 0.5 | 3.69 


4.14 


1.00 


2.3| - 0.5 | 0.33 


3.42 


3.72 




35 


1.35 




General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








- 


1.5 


°2.1 


0.8 


0.5 


3.06 


3.51 


1.00 


1.6 


0.5 


0.33 


2.79 


3.09 




1 


1.5 


°2.3 


0.8 


0.5 


3.24 


3.69 


1.00 


1.8 


0.5 


0.33 


2.97 


3.27 




" 


1.35 




General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 






General Rate (see notes) 
General Rate (see notes) 








[ 


1.35 


2.4 


0.7 


0.45 


3.60 


4.05 


1.00 


1.91 - 0.5 1 0.35 


3.40 


3.75 




■ 


#1.5 




General Rate (see r 


lotes) 






General Rate (see notes) 








1.5 


3.4 


- 


0.9 


4.32 


5.13 


1.35 


3.1 


2.0 


0.33 


3.81 


4.10 






226 



Municipal Electrical Service 



Municipal Electric! 
NET MONTHLY BILLS FOR FLAT RATE WATU 

Also applicable to utilities using gross rate schedules provicg 



































SCHEC! 


Element 
rating 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


32 


33 


34 


35 


36 


37 


38 


39 


40 




watts 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 




400 


.90 


.94 


.97 


1.01 


1.04 


1.08 


1.12 


1.15 


1.19 


1.22 


1.26 


1.30 


1.33 


1.37 


1.40 


1.44 


!l 


450 


1.01 


1.05 


1.09 


1.13 


1.17 


1.22 


1.26 


1.30 


1.34 


1.38 


1.42 


1.46 


1.50 


1.54 


1.58 


1.62 


:i 


500 


1.13 


1.17 


1.22 


1.26 


1.31 


1.35 


1.40 


1.44 


1.49 


1.53 


1.58 


1.62 


1.67 


1.71 


1.76 


1.80 


i 


550 


1.24 


1.29 


1.34 


1.39 


1.44 


1.49 


1.53 


1.58 


1.63 


1.68 


1.73 


1.78 


1.83 


1.88 


1.93 


1.98 


:s 


600 


1.35 


1.40 


1.46 


1.51 


1.57 


1.62 


1.67 


1.73 


1.78 


1.84 


1.89 


1.94 


2.00 


2.05 


2.11 


2.16 


:i 


650 


1.43 


1.49 


1.54 


1.60 


1.66 


1.72 


1.77 


1.83 


1.89 


1.94 


2.00 


2.06 


2.12 


2.17 


2.23 


2.29 




700 


1.51 


1.57 


1.63 


1.69 


1.75 


1.81 


1.87 


1.93 


1.99 


2.05 


2.11 


2.17 


2.23 


2.29 


2.35 


2.41 


j 


750 


1.60 


1.66 


1.72 


1.79 


1.85 


1.91 


1.98 


2.04 


2.11 


2.17 


2.23 


2.30 


2.36 


2.42 


2.49 


2.55 




800 


1.67 


1.74 


1.80 


1.87 


1.94 


2.00 


2.07 


2.14 


2.20 


2.27 


2.34 


2.40 


2.47 


2.54 


2.61 


2.67 




850 


1.75 


1.82 


1.89 


1.96 


2.03 


2.10 


2.17 


2.24 


2.31 


2.38 


2.45 


2.52 


2.59 


2.66 


2.73 


2.80 




900 


1.84 


1.91 


1.98 


2.06 


2.13 


2.20 


2.28 


2.35 


2.42 


2.50 


2.57 


2.64 


2.72 


2.79 


2.86 


2.94 




950 


1.92 


2.00 


2.07 


2.15 


2.23 


2.30 


2.38 


2.46 


2.53 


2.61 


2.69 


2.76 


2.84 


2.92 


3.00 


3.07 




1,000 


2.00 


2.08 


2.16 


2.24 


2.32 


2.40 


2.48 


2.56 


2.64 


2.72 


2.80 


2.88 


2.96 


3.04 


3.12 


3.20 


8 


1,000/3,000 


2.12 


2.21 


2.30 


2.38 


2.47 


2.55 


2.64 


2.72 


2.81 


2.89 


2.98 


3.06 


3.14 


3.23 


3.31 


3.40 


8 


1,500/4,500 


3.19 


3.31 


3.44 


3.57 


3.70 


3.83 


3.95 


4.08 


4.20 


4.34 


4.46 


4.59 


4.72 


4.84 


4.97 


5.10 


3 



Note: Net monthly rates for all balanced element sizes over 1,000 watts are calculated as follows: 

Element Rating 

Xooo 



Rate for 1,000- watt element X 



NOTES 

Service Charges 

a 330 per month per service when the permanently installed appliance load is under 2,000 watt 

660 per month when 2,000 watts or more, 
b Demand rate 8.50 per 100 watts, minimum 500. 

House Heating 

Applicable where electric energy is used to heat an entire dwelling or a portion of a dwelling in e 
of 25% of the floor area. 

□ Energy supplied through residential service meter at standard rates. 

Energy metered separately at end residential rate, or energy supplied through residential se i 
meter at standard rates. 



All-Electric Service 

Applicable to all energy sold to residential customers using all-electric house heating and el< 
water-heating supplied through the residential service meter. 

A The first 1,750 kwh use per month to be billed at regular residential rates. 

z Applicable to multiple dwelling units served through one meter. 



Statement C 



227 



price 

RATING AT SCHEDULE NUMBER INDICATED 

> >me nt is made on or before last date for net payment 



siBER 




43 


44 


45 


46 


47 


48 


49 


50 


51 


52 


53 


54 


55 


56 


57 


58 


59 


60 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1 


1.55 


1.58 


1.62 


1.66 


1.69 


1.73 


1.76 


1.80 


1.84 


1.87 


1.91 


1.94 


1.98 


2.02 


2.05 


2.09 


2.12 


2.16 





1.74 


1.78 


1.82 


1.86 


1.90 


1.94 


1.98 


2.03 


2.06 


2.11 


2.14 


2.18 


2.22 


2.27 


2.30 


2.34 


2.39 


2.45 


9 


1.94 


1.98 


2.03 


2.07 


2.12 


2.16 


2.21 


2.25 


2.30 


2.34 


2.39 


2.43 


2.48 


2.52 


2.57 


2.61 


2.66 


2.70 


8 


2.13 


2.18 


2.23 


2.28 


2.33 


2.38 


2.43 


2.48 


2.53 


2.57 


2.63 


2.68 


2.73 


2.77 


2.83 


2.88 


2.93 


2.99 


7 


2.32 


2.38 


2.43 


2.48 


2.54 


2.59 


2.65 


2.70 


2.75 


2.81 


2.86 


2.92 


2.97 


3.02 


3.08 


3.13 


3.19 


3.24 





2.46 


2.52 


2.57 


2.63 


2.69 


2.75 


2.80 


2.86 


2.93 


2.99 


3.03 


3.08 


3.14 


3.20 


3.26 


3.31 


3.38 


3.44 


3 


2.59 


2.65 


2.71 


2.77 


2.83 


2.89 


2.95 


3.01 


3.08 


3.13 


3.20 


3.26 


3.32 


3.38 


3.44 


3.49 


3.56 


3.62 


8 


2.74 


2.81 


2.87 


2.93 


3.00 


3.06 


3.13 


3.19 


3.26 


3.31 


3.38 


3.44 


3.51 


3.58 


3.65 


3.71 


3.76 


3.82 


1 


2.87 


2.94 


3.01 


3.07 


3.14 


3.21 


3.27 


3.34 


3.41 


3.47 


3.54 


3.60 


3.67 


3.74 


3.82 


3.89 


3.94 


4.00 


4 


3.01 


3.08 


3.15 


3.22 


3.29 


3.36 


3.43 


3.51 


3.56 


3.64 


3.71 


3.78 


3.85 


3.92 


4.00 


4.07 


4.13 


4.19 


8 


3.16 


3.23 


3.30 


3.38 


3.45 


3.52 


3.60 


3.67 


3.74 


3.82 


3.89 


3.96 


4.04 


4.12 


4.19 


4.27 


4.33 


4.39 


3 


3.30 


3.38 


3.46 


3.53 


3.61 


3.69 


3.76 


3.84 


3.92 


4.00 


4.07 


4.14 


4.22 


4.30 


4.38 


4.46 


4.54 


4.61 


6 


3.44 


3.52 


3.60 


3.68 


3.76 


3.84 


3.92 


4.00 


4.08 


4.16 


4.24 


4.32 


4.40 


4.48 


4.56 


4.64 


4.73 


4.81 


1 


3.65 


3.74 


3.83 


3.91 


4.00 


4.08 


4.17 


4.25 


4.34 


4.42 


4.51 


4.59 


4.67 


4.76 


4.84 


4.93 


5.01 


5.10 




5.48 


5.61 


5.73 


5.87 


5.99 


6.12 


6.25 


6.37 


6.50 


6.63 


6.76 


6.89 


7.01 


7.14 


7.26 


7.40 


7.52 


7.65 



5 rial Rates or Discounts 

t First 60 kwh of monthly consumption at 2.00, second 60 kwh and all kwh in excess of 1,000 at 1.00. 
i Flat-rate water-heater service — Toronto. 

S tem-owned 

First 400 watts $2.90 per month. 

Each 100 watts additional 400 per month, plus a monthly charge for larger tank sizes as follows: 

300 for 1000 watt and 1200 watt heaters 

400 for 1500 watt heaters. 

500 for 2000 watt and 2500 watt heaters. 

550 for 3000 watts and over. 

1000/3000 watt Cascade 40— $5.82 gross per month. 

Cjtorner-owned 

First 400 watts $1.98 per month 
Each 100 watts additional 400 per month. 
wSpecial rate for metered water-heating customers only. 

^\ hen loads are subject to central control, these rates may be somewhat lower. 
NRates are net (subject to 5% or 10% Delayed Payment Charge), 
n Residential rates are net (subject to 5% Delayed Payment Charge). 

Commercial customers with a connected load of under 5 kilowatts billed at residential rates. 
* Rate applicable to existing customers only, future customers to be billed at General Rate. 
5 f arm customers billed at standard rural rates. 
55 r arm customers billed at special rates. 
S "special rate applicable to selected categories. 



228 



Municipal Electrical Service 



GENERAL AND 

Rates quoted are net and are subject to a 



GENERAL RATE (0-5000 KW) 



Demand Charges 



1st Block 

at N.C. 



Kw 



2nd Block 



Kw 



$/Kw 



Bal- 
ance 

$'/Kw 



Energy Charges 



1st 

50Kwh 

tf/Kwh 



Next 

200 Kwh 

0/Kwh 



Next Block 



Size 
Kwh 



Alexandria . . . 
Alvinston 

Apple Hill 

Arkona 

Athens 

Barrie 

Bath 

Bolton 

Bothwell 

Brantford 

Brockville 

Burford 

Caledonia 
Cannington . . . 
Casselman 

Chalk River . . . 
Chapleau Twp. 
Chippawa 
Coldwater 
Delhi 

Elora 

Embro 

Finch 

Fonthill 

Gravenhurst . . 

Hagersville 

Harriston 

Harrow 

Hastings 

Hawkesbury . . 

Hespeler 

Ingersoll 

Kingsville .... 

Lanark 

Lancaster .... 

Leamington . . . 

Lindsay 

London 

Magnetawan . . 
Massey 

Mattawa 

Maxville 

Midland 

Milton 

Mitchell 

Newboro 

Nipigon Twp. . 

North Bay 

Oakville 

Orangeville . . . 

Oshawa 

Paisley 

Pembroke 
Penetanguishene 
Perth 



50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
25 
10 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 

25 
50 
50 

50 
50 
25 
50 
50 



0.90 
1.00 



25 



25 



1.10 



0.90 



1.80 
1.60 
1.20 
1.20 
1.60 

1.55 
1.50 
1.80 
1.70 
1.50 

1.70 
1.70 
1.60 
1.20 
1.60 

1.70 
1.80 
1.60 
1.70 
1.60 

1.70 
1.40 
1.70 
1.70 
1.60 

1.60 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.90 

1.60 
1.40 
1.70 
1.60 
1.40 

1.70 
1.60 
1.70 
1.40 
1.30 

1.80 
1.70 
1.40 
1.50 
1.70 

1.40 
1.50 
1.70 
1.90 
1.70 

1.50 
1.70 
1.90 
1.30 
1.50 



4.0 
4.0 

3.2 
3.5 
4.0 

4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
4.0 
3.6 

4.0 
4.0 
3.6 
3.1 
3.0 

4.0 
5.0 
4.0 
3.0 

3.5 

5.0 
3.5 
3.5 
4.4 
3.0 

3.6 
4.5 
4.5 
4.0 
3.4 

4.0 
4.0 
3.0 
3.0 

3.4 

4.0 
3.0 
5.0 
3.0 

4.0 

4.5 
3.5 
2.8 
3.0 
4.0 

4.0 
3.8 
4.0 
5.0 

3.5 

4.0 
3.4 
5.0 
3.0 
3.3 



2.0 
1.6 
1.2 
1.2 
2.0 

1.6 
1.5 
2.0 
1.5 
1.5 

1.6 
2.0 
1.8 
1.2 
1.8 

2.3 
2.5 
2.0 
1.5 
1.6 

2.5 
1.5 
1.5 
2.2 
1.5 



2.2 
1.5 
2.0 
2.0 

2.0 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 
1.3 

1.5 
1.4 
1.8 
1.5 
1.9 

3.0 
1.5 
1.4 
1.4 
1.7 

1.6 
1.4 
2.0 

2.5 



1.5 
1.7 
3.0 
1.4 
1.7 



9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
4,750 
1,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
4,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
4,750 
9,750 
9,750 



Statement C 



LARGE USER RATES 

delayed payment charge unless otherwise noted. 



GENERAL RATE (0-5000 KW) 








e INTERMEDIATE 








LARGE USER RATE 


RATE 




Energy Charges 




Over 5000 Kw 


500-5000 Kw 




Next Block 


Next Block 


Bal- 
ance 


Demand 
Charge 


Energy 
Charge 


Demand 
Charge 


Energy 
Charge 


Minimum 


Size 




Size 




BillO 


Kwh 


tf/Kwh 


Kwh 


?/Kwh 


tf/Kwh 


$/Kwh 


tf/Kwh 


$/Kwh 


tf/Kwh 


$/Month 










0.5 










2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.60 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


0.55 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


• 2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


5,000 


0.9 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 7T 


8,000 


0.8 


- 


- 


0.5 


2.00 


0.3 


2.00 


0.3 


• 2.00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


0.5 


2.20 


0.3 


1.95 


0.4 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


— 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


— 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


• 1.67 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.50 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.55 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.50 




- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 




- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.50 




- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 




_ 


_ 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


1.75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1.80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


2.50 


0.4 


2.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


2.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


: 


_ 


_ 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


1.90 


0.4 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.50 




- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.70 


: 


_ 


_ 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.00 




- 


1,490,000 


0.5 


0.3 


2.20 


0.3 


- 


- 


1.50 


- 


- 


1,365,000 


0.5 


0.3 


2.25 


0.3 


- 


- 


2.50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


0.6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


5 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


_ 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.25 




- 


- 


- 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.00 


5,000 


0.8 


- 


- 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


2.15 


0.4 


2.50 7T 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.55 


2.75 


0.3 


- 


- 


2.50 


" 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


_ 


1,865,000 


0.5 


0.3 


2.25 


0.3 


_ 


_ 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


2.00 


5,000 


1.25 


- 


_ 


0.55 


_ 


_ 


2.15 


0.45 


2.00 7T 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


1.50 




- 


- 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.00 


7T 25 kv 


' and under 



















230 



Municipal Electrical Service 



GENERAL ANI 

Rates quoted are net and are subject to ; 



GENERAL RATE (0-5000 Kw) 



Demand Charges 



1st Block 

at N.C. 

Kw 



2nd Block 



Kw 



$/Kw 



Bal- 
ance 

$/Kwh 



Energy Charges 



1st 
50 Kwh 

^/Kwh 



Next 

200 Kwh 

0/Kwh 



Next Block 



Size 
Kwh 



Peterborough 

Plantagenet 

Plattsville 

Port Arthur 

Port Colborne 

Port Credit 

Port McNicoll 

Port Perry 

Princeton 

Red Rock 

Rockland 

Rodney 

Rosseau 

Russell 

St. Catharines 

St. Clair Beach . . . 

St. George 

Sandwich West Twp. 
Schreiber Twp. . . . 
Seaforth 

South Grimsby Twp 

Springfield 

Stratford 

Tavistock 

Tecumseh 

Thornbury 

Thornton 

Vaughan Twp 

Victoria Harbour . . 
Wardsville 

Warkworth 

Waubaushene 

Webbwood 

Welland 

Wellesley 

Wellington 

Wheatley 

Whitby 

Wiarton 

Winchester 

Windsor 

Woodstock 

Woodville 

York 



50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 

25 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 

25 



350 



1.70 



25 



1.10 



150 



1.70 



25 



1.00 



1.50 
1.50 
1.70 
1.30 



1.90 
1.60 
1.70 
1.20 
1.70 

1.90 
1.60 
1.40 
1.60 
1.70 

1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 



1.60 
1.70 
1.20 
1.70 

1.90 
1.60 
1.70 
1.90 
1.70 

1.80 
1.70 
1.50 
1.70 
1.70 

1.20 
1.70 
1.70 
1.70 
1.40 

1.70 
1.70 
1.60 
1.60 



5.0 
4.5 
3.0 
3.6 
5.0 

4.5 
2.6 
4.0 
3.0 
4.0 

4.0 
4.0 
3.0 
3.0 
5.0 

4.5 
3.5 
4.5 
4.0 
4.0 

5.0 
4.0 
4.5 
4.0 
4.5 

3.4 
3.4 
5.0 
3.6 
5.0 

4.0 
3.3 
4.5 
5.0 
5.0 

2.7 
4.0 
4.5 
3.4 
3.0 

4.5 
4.5 
3.2 
2.6 



1.7 

2.5 
1.5 
1.4 

2.5 

2.2 
1.4 
1.5 
1.5 
1.6 

2.0 
1.5 
1.5 
1.5 

2.5 

1.5 
1.5 
2.5 
2.0 
2.0 

2.5 
2.0 
2.3 
1.3 
1.5 

1.6 
1.6 

2.1 
1.7 

2.5 

2.0 
1.6 
2.0 
2.5 
2.0 

1.3 
1.5 
2.0 
1.7 
1.4 

1.7 
1.8 
1.5 



9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
4,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
9,750 

9,750 
9,750 
9,750 
4,950 



NOTES: 

Rates quoted are net (unless otherwise stated) and subject to 
a delayed payment charge of 5% or 10% if bills not paid on or 
before due date. 

Rates are based upon service at utilization voltage; where the 
customer provides transformation facilities, the authorized 
allowance will apply. 



• This minimum also applicable to customers billed on power 
demand 



O Applicable to customers billed on energy rates only. Wl 
demand charge billed, minimum bill becomes $0.25 per 
for all kilowatts, based on maximum demand establisl 
in previous eleven months or the contracted amoi 
whichever is the greater. 



> Where intermediate rate is applicable to customers v 
loads of 500 to 5000 kw, the basic general rate applie 
customers with loads under 500 kw. 



Statement D 



231 



ARGE USER RATES 

clayed payment charge unless otherwise noted. 



GENERAL RATE (0-5000 Kw) 




LARGE USER RATE 


©INTERMEDIATE 
RATE 










Energy Charges 




Over 5000 Kw 


500-5000 Kw 




Next Block 


Next Block 


Bal- 
ance 


Demand 
Charge 


Energy 
Charge 


Demand 
Charge 


Energy 
Charge 


Minimum 


Size 




Size 




Bill© 


Kwh 


0/Kwh 


Kwh 


tf/Kwh 


tf/Kwh 


$/Kw 


*/Kwh 


$/Kw 


0/Kwh 


$/Month 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


0.5 


2.15 


0.3 






3.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


1,490,000 


0.5 


0.3 


1.90 


0.3 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


+2.05 


0.4 


2.50 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


0.55 


2.50 


0.33 


_ 


_ 


2.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


2.40 


0.3 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


1.75 


5,000 


0.8 


- 


- 


0.5 


2.25 


0.3 


2.05 


0.4 


2.50*- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


++2.25 


0.4 


2.50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.25 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.70 


- 


- 


190,000 


0.5 


0.4 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.50 


= 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.50 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


2.15 


0.4 


2.50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.50 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


•1.50 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.50 


- 


- 


1,500,000 


0.5 


0.3 


2.40 


0.3 


_ 


_ 


2.25 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


2.75 


0.3 


- 


- 


2.00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.5 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1.60 


5,000 


0.9 


- 


- 


0.5 


2.10 


0.33 


- 


- 


2.00 7T 























t 25 






kw and under 
Rates are gross - subject to a prompt payment discount of 10%. 
Over 400 kw 
•+Over 200 kw 
General rate applicable to former Small Commercial and Industrial Power Service customers only. 
Retail service provided by The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario. 



Municipal Electrical Service 



CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 

In Forty Major Municipal 

(Arranged in descending order 



Total 
Revenue 

(including 

Street 
Lighting) 



TOTAL 

Consumption 

(including 

Street 
Lighting) 



Residential Service 

(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus 

tomers 



•I | 
111 

idl 



Toronto 

Hamilton 

North York . . . 

Ottawa 

Etobicoke 

Scarborough . . 

London* 

Windsor* 

Mississauga 
St. Catharines* 

Oshawa* 

Kitchener 

Oakville* 

York* 

Guelph 

Peterborough* . 

Brantford* 

Burlington 

Sarnia 

Sudbury 

Kingston 

Port Arthur* . . 
Niagara Falls . . 
Nepean Twp . . 
East York 

Fort William . . 

Waterloo 

North Bay* . . . 

Gait 

Welland* 

Chatham 

Brampton 
Woodstock* . . . 

Belleville 

Barrie © 

Stratford* 

St. Thomas . . . 
Vaughan Twp.* 
Gloucester Twp. 
Brockville* . . . 



54,667,265 
30,066,137 
24,915,386 
19,501,462 
18,357,113 

16,082,873 
12,288,798 
11,713,264 
10,393,403 
7,455,509 

6,181,517 
6,997,114 
5,925,071 
5,839,458 
4,339,610 

3,836,458 
3,660,152 
4,265,143 
3,467,571 
3,741,249 

3,464,031 
2,866,173 
3,510,107 
3,313,472 
2,914,027 

2,359,642 
2,666,627 
2,587,562 
2,369,370 
2,390,703 

2,665,484 
2,426,008 
1,908,690 
1,894,703 

1,723,579 

1,926,657 
1,607,401 
1,411,382 
1,569,362 
1,366,345 



kwh 
4,826,722,236 
3,652,940,424 
2,090,547,683 
1,851,265,588 
1,660,631,856 

1,383,421,166 

1,024,761,042 

1,005,358,517 

949,600,770 

746,805,008 

643,457,819 
632,807,817 
628,430,874 
584,788,681 
369,793,536 

360,397,505 
345,892,643 
345,335,954 
332,678,266 
328,812,531 

319,572,066 
280,547,284 
267,865,693 
267,099,205 
262,215,934 

248,737,445 
228,343,053 
220,609,635 
211,684,162 
200,078,792 

197,162,859 
190,221,712 
178,465,494 
172,726,350 
166,076,667 

151,586,230 
137,495,380 
131,147,416 
127,986,001 
127,363,337 



15,309,063 
6,203,745 

11,264,456 
6,389,574 
7,448,258 

7,514,102 
5,301,883 
4,285,497 
3,794,768 
2,360,828 

2,331,802 
2,341,640 
1,752,322 
2,697,806 
1,631,044 

1,770,199 
1,431,137 
2,236,576 
1,321,673 
2,069,176 

1,446,427 
1,105,109 
1,409,027 
1,893,104 

1,577,723 

1,014,163 
884,290 

1,233,538 
946,943 
758,531 

730,900 
1,013,456 
711,807 
876,075 
794,294 

736,398 
678,526 
527,543 
754,053 
600,493 



kwh 

1,135,674,699 
524,967,128 
936,053,739 
776,066,587 
649,230,990 

620,506,249 
367,076,830 
289,296,407 
312,184,006 
177,406,587 

219,353,189 
211,511,557 
134,980,798 
264,009,736 
124,926,868 

149,183,708 
115,586,985 
175,791,625 
100,862,622 
205,017,961 

133,727,346 
105,856,438 
103,292,221 
148,854,721 
140,135,168 

119,362,103 
74,646,894 

100,202,566 
77,867,640 
52,006,703 

47,241,288 
75,815,006 
61,149,824 
83,210,746 
73,522,053 

54,168,270 
52,387,002 
43,014,369 
55,937,983 
50,344,439 



198,221 
83,941 

112,817 
88,671 
79,776 

78,392 
58,553 
53,704 
30,630 
27,894 

22,194 
29,027 
13,616 
41,666 

14,717 

15,894 
18,222 
18,995 
15,706 
23,844 

16,478 
13,291 
16,698 

12,493 
23,843 

13,856 
7,640 
12,755 
10,040 
10,797 

9,371 
8,603 
7,295 
10,357 
8,143 

6,873 
7,905 
4,534 
5,908 
6,113 



kwh 

476 
525 
697 
732 
680 

669 
529 
450 
879 
536 

817 
620 
835 
§511 
717 

§761 
539 
790 

541 
723 

679 
665 
520 
1,011 
490 

720 
804 

§663 
650 

§397 

424 
737 
§670 
675 
767 

657 
556 
791 
851 
692 



♦Municipalities so indicated have general rate in effect. See note on page 230 
©General rate applies to former industrial power service customers only 
§ Estimated 



Statement D 



233 



AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1968 
Electrical Utilities 
of total consumption) 





Commercial Service 




Industrial Power Service 




(Including flat-rate 


water-heaters) 












AND WHERE APPLICABLE * SERVICE 














UNDER GENERAL RATE 


















•§ 1 


Av- 








"O 


• § 1 


Av- 








£ E 


erage 










£ E 

£L O 


erage 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Monthly 
Consum] 
per Cust 


Cost 
per 
Kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Average 
Custome 
Monthly 
Loads B 


Monthly 
Consum] 
per Cust 


Cost 

per 
Kwh A 


$ 


kwh 




kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 




kw 


kwh 


i 


11,768,378 


835,536,255 


25,202 


2,761 


1.41 


26,335,954 


2,788,078,312 


7,669 


598,432 


30,355 


0.95 


4,533,454 


376,262,265 


9,256 


3,421 


1.20 


18,719,363 


2,728,331,642 


912 


462,026 


245,530 


0.69 


8,795,313 


714,536,165 


8,267 


7,430 


1.23 


4,386,752 


411,839,779 


1,240 


115,316 


28,340 


1.07 


12,001,771 


1,003,887,161 


11,685 


7,186 


1.20 


548,177 


53,283,220 


147 


14,995 


30,104 


1.03 


3,665,645 


280,480,175 


3,842 


6,215 


1.31 


6,666,243 


711,016,013 


1,356 


170,032 


44,701 


0.94 


4,260,682 


338,922,146 


4,019 


7,326 


1.26 


4,087,422 


404,683,971 


713 


102,151 


49,376 


1.01 


6,617,145 


643,762,972 


5,569 


9,825 


1.03 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


6,958,610 


699,389,410 


6,447 


9,083 


0.99 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


1,848,571 


139,603,666 


1,443 


8,672 


1.32 


4,444,326 


492,115,282 


428 


96,744 


97,875 


0.90 


4.871,022 


559,054,421 


3,023 


15,426 


0.87 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


3,686,145 


417,228,870 


2,629 


14,091 


0.88 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


1,743,996 


132,604,657 


1,826 


6,132 


1.32 


2,690,432 


280,141,603 


269 


67,613 


86,144 


0.96 


4,092 387 


490,688,272 


2,059 


20,035 


0.83 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


3,069,209 


313,517,745 


4,200 


§9,731 


0.98 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


811,045 


55,388,057 


1,119 


4,121 


1.46 


1,746,800 


184,637,283 


126 


42,912 


118,357 


0.95 


1,921,836 


206,787,797 


1,865 


§12,584 


0.93 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


2,105,972 


226,381,077 


2,110 


8,998 


0.93 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


992,557 


74,113,370 


997 


6,598 


1.34 


974,121 


92,655,039 


193 


26,227 


40,962 


1.05 


778,115 


56,751,394 


936 


5,104 


1.37 


1,224,852 


170,820,570 


158 


33,621 


89,811 


0.72 


1,201,590 


95,854,772 


2,388 


3,390 


1.25 


282,439 


22,896,749 


308 


8,710 


6,277 


1.23 


1,315,190 


111,801,538 


2,719 


3,482 


1.18 


589,869 


69,787,407 


170 


17,694 


33,714 


0.85 


1,609,433 


168,931,246 


1,611 


8,717 


0.95 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


1,353,494 


104,900,619 


1,138 


7,682 


1.29 


572,667 


54,503,137 


95 


14,031 


47,810 


1.05 


1,071,574 


83,612,282 


919 


7,785 


1.28 


342,512 


34,101,202 


64 


7,527 


46,586 


1.00 


769,816 


69,547,257 


1,104 


5,288 


1.11 


437,709 


47,648,725 


92 


11,575 


42,468 


0.92 


704,387 


70,532,326 


1,768 


3,500 


1.00 


509,837 


54,325,016 


84 


19,393 


37,260 


0.94 


728,909 


56,285,583 


880 


5,394 


1.30 


941,380 


93,987,125 


97 


19,222 


81,163 


1.00 


1,308,674 


118,277,892 


1,954 


§5,649 


1.11 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


350,818 


26,371,500 


591 


3,802 


1.33 


980,032 


104,578,222 


154 


27,066 


57,335 


0.94 


1,527,325 


145,149,446 


1,226 


§12,505 


1.05 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


715,903 


40,031,270 


1,232 


2,657 


1.79 


1,092,852 


106,072,737 


291 


25,505 


30,428 


1.03 


650,664 


47,838,422 


574 


7,119 


1.36 


685,708 


64,811,484 


125 


16,636 


43,556 


1.06 


1,139,683 


114,707,150 


963 


§13,817 


0.99 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


539,000 


41,473,517 


1,018 


3,424 


1.30 


392,216 


44,770,421 


121 


11,184 


30,962 


0.88 


414,969 


32,671,216 


618 


4,438 


1.27 


499,269 


58,791,582 


120 


9 


41,344 


0.85 


1,095,389 


94,547,540 


928 


8,601 


1.16 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


257,501 


19,486,456 


461 


3,703 


1.32 


633,593 


64,535,266 


147 


16,072 


37,608 


0.98 


876,366 


87,501,847 


1,158 


6,297 


1.00 


* 


* 


+ 


* 


* 


* 


608.591 


57,253,766 


370 


14,371 


1.06 


189,645 


13,724,476 


49 


5,357 


24,596 


1.38 


719,801 


75,524,236 


839 


7,619 


0.95 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 



A See introduction page 203 



234 



Municipal Electrical Service 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 
(By Municipalities 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Customers 



Peak 
Load 
Decem- 
ber 
1968 



Residential Service 

(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



•J! 
ifs 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig 

Ajax 

Alexandria* 

Alfred 

Alliston 

Almonte 

Alvinston* 

Amherstburg 

Ancaster Twp. (incl. Ancaster) 

Apple Hill* 

Arkona* 

Arnprior 

Arthur 

Athens* 

Atikokan Twp 

Aurora 

Avonmore 

Aylmer 

Ayr 

Baden 

fBala 

Bancroft 

Barrie © 

Barry's Bay 

Bath* 

Beachburg 

Beachville 

Beamsville 

fBeardmore 

Beaverton 

Beeton 

Belle River 

Belleville 

Belmont 

Blenheim 

fBlind River 

Bloomfield 

Blyth 

Bobcaygeon 



4,604 

558 

10,331 

2,953 

1,110 

3,214 

3,518 

637 

4,616 

15,183 

325 

419 

5,728 

1,271 

1,021 

6,178 

10,662 

229 

4,452 

1,178 

946 

x449 

2,220 

25,481 

1,451 

752 
559 
982 
4,047 
849 

1,207 

998 

2,549 

32,908 

750 

3,301 

3,394 

714 

779 

1,244 



1,551 

237 

3,036 

1,122 

368 

1,212 
1,213 
341 
1,577 
1,169 

120 
203 
1,961 
557 
389 

1,813 
3,130 

115 
1,681 

437 

306 

861 

815 

8,881 

473 

279 
224 
338 
1,395 
311 

645 
354 
904 
11,496 
256 

1,282 

1,141 

294 

353 

837 



kw 
7,668 
494 
13,141 

4,771 
1,357 

4,348 
4,077 
522 
6,174 
3,671 

247 

391 

8,023 

1,414 

1,042 

4,641 

11,782 

251 

7,256 

1,410 

1,355 
1,183 
2,578 
34,843 
1,236 

758 

582 

2,718 

3,524 

597 

2,324 

881 

1,848 

37,808 

1,408 

2,841 
3,606 
716 
1,165 
2,015 



$ 

122,055 
12,802 

247,995 
94,130 
35,689 

87,467 

93,164 

13,454 

114,655 

147,321 

7,454 

14,164 

150,606 

40,465 

27,558 

204,985 

242,480 

9,079 

132,675 

33,066 

25,971 
54,487 
69,881 
794,294 
29,596 

23,520 

17,284 

23,989 

106,030 

25,177 

47,648 
26,761 
64,164 
876,075 
24,538 

71,480 
106,923 
20,546 
24,600 
66,510 



kwh 
11,193,616 

1,169,730 
18,881,778 

8,682,029 

3,141,745 

8,477,156 

8,718,500 

816,740 

10,919,496 

11,828,985 

619,970 

1,200,530 

15,585,929 

3,734,743 
2,660,842 

14,785,721 

22,954,305 

601,594 

13,367,321 

3,128,023 

2,448,286 
2,446,000 
6,046,260 
73,522,053 
2,505,583 

1,959,232 
1,308,855 
2,303,760 
8,127,672 
1,682,800 

4,684,420 
2,575,420 
4,488,630 
83,210,746 
1,960,811 

5,697,324 
7,704,500 
1,939,115 
2,270,080 
5,042,961 



1,438 
214 

2,826 
935 

337 

1,020 
1,124 
277 
1,445 
1,114 

101 
170 
1,786 
488 
336 

1,658 
2,824 

102 
1,526 

359 

288 
781 
724 
8,143 
431 

249 
207 
325 
1,272 
234 

594 
333 
846 
10,357 
240 

1,143 
945 
272 
312 

742 



kwh 

674 
464 
581 
§750 
792 

691 
647 
248 
658 
886 

525 
592 
730 
640 
§640 

732 
689 
491 

743 
747 

706 
261 
704 
767 
486 

661 
526 
599 
536 
581 

663 
650 
455 
675 
698 

418 
674 
592 
607 
576 



* Municipalities so indicated have general rate in effect. See note on page 230 
©General rate applies to former industrial power service customers only 
t Retail service provided by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
§ Estimated 



Statement D 



235 



AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1968 
Alphabetically Arranged) 





COMMERCIAL SERVICE 






Industrial Power Service 






(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 














AND WHERE APPLICABLE * SERVICE 
















UNDER GENERAL RATE 




















• <= £ 


Av- 










•eg 


Av- 








. Q, O 


erage 








of 
:rs' 

Illed 


ii 


erage 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Monthly 
Consum 
per Cust 


Cost 
per 
Kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Average 
Custom* 
Monthly 
Loads B 


Monthly 
Consum; 
per Cust 


Cost 
per 

Kwh A 


$ 


kwh 




kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 




kw 


kwh 


i 


36,920 


2,453,638 


75 


2,782 


1.50 


180,416 


15,596,343 


38 


4,573 


34,659 


1.16 


4,519 


309,720 


17 


1,434 


1.46 


8,322 


523,530 


6 


313 


6,712 


1.59 


130,043 


10,302,418 


125 


6,896 


1.26 


332,276 


33,668,094 


85 


9,346 


33,203 


0.99 


116,614 


9,989,354 


187 


§8,258 


1.17 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


10,576 


664,770 


21 


2,638 


1.59 


10,156 


729,480 


10 


327 


6,079 


1.39 


82.523 


5,277,412 


160 


2,801 


1.56 


65,700 


7,084,703 


32 


1,841 


19,045 


0.93 


29,699 


2,443,126 


70 


3,156 


1.22 


47,797 


6,214,895 


19 


1,502 


26,559 


0.77 


8,894 


574,340 


64 


748 


1.55 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


69,668 


5,179,650 


92 


4,053 


1.35 


139,937 


14,708,130 


40 


3,669 


31,030 


0.95 


38,410 


2,315,067 


47 


4,193 


1.66 


5,827 


439,289 


8 


142 


4,576 


1.33 


1,453 


106,120 


19 


465 


1.37 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


4,779 


383,210 


33 


968 


1.25 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


80,056 


6,386,661 


151 


3,525 


1.25 


154,297 


20,350,005 


24 


3,933 


67,833 


0.76 


18,249 


1,212,284 


53 


2,062 


1.51 


7,131 


327,412 


16 


269 


1,760 


2.18 


11,764 


961,528 


53 


§3,446 


1.22 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


95,218 


5,390,856 


145 


3,120 


1.77 


7,197 


516,563 


10 


181 


4,305 


1.39 


120,958 


9,554,332 


261 


3,185 


1.27 


147,144 


14,824,447 


45 


4,185 


27,151 


0.99 


3,298 


173,880 


12 


1,260 


1.90 


949 


44,950 


1 


32 


3,746 


2.11 


74,558 


5,909,066 


120 


4,003 


1.26 


91,134 


7,403,256 


35 


2,978 


18,145 


1.23 


14,737 


946,683 


64 


1,233 


1.56 


21,635 


1,266,957 


14 


669 


7,541 


1.71 


5,786 


415,297 


13 


2,662 


1.39 


24,166 


2,080,767 


5 


714 


34,679 


1.16 


14,277 


686,000 


74 


783 


2.08 


2,042 


146,500 


6 


48 


2,035 


1.39 


37,901 


2,360,273 


77 


2,676 


1.61 


11,890 


779,510 


14 


366 


4,640 


1.53 


414,969 


32,671,216 


618 


4,438 


1.27 


499,269 


58,791,582 


120 


© 


41,344 


0.85 


21,076 


1,693,182 


40 


4,031 


1.24 


1,475 


104,550 


2 


50 


3,485 


1.41 


8,205 


598,900 


30 


1,664 


1.37 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


3,728 


253,126 


13 


1,688 


1.47 


8,266 


610,760 


4 


243 


12,724 


1.35 


2,636 


179,020 


11 


1,421 


1.47 


89,973 


13,653,774 


2 


2,167 568,907 


0.66 


65,204 


4,659,624 


110 


3,788 


1.40 


14,262 


780,855 


13 


438 


5,206 


1.83 


17,488 


1,078,600 


75 


1,183 


1.62 


197 


10,800 


2 


5 


450 


1.82 


20,898 


1,806,030 


36 


4,427 


1.16 


21,082 


1,652,030 


15 


887 


9,178 


1.28 


4,874 


280,435 


14 


1,731 


1.74 


6,631 


488,250 


7 


144 


5,813 


1.36 


35,850 


2,438,548 


50 


4,064 


147 


6,313 


412,555 


8 


185 


4,297 


1.53 


539,000 


41,473,517 


1,018 


3,424 


1.30 


392,216 


44,770,421 


121 


11,184 


30 962 


0.88 


4,364 


256,567 


11 


1,944 


1.70 


43,575 


4,010,734 


5 


979 


66,846 


1.09 


51,390 


3,299,185 


107 


2,511 


1.56 


44,635 


2,964,750 


32 


1,175 


7,375 


1.51 


76,682 


4,614,300 


190 


2,056 


1.66 


51,611 


4,290,700 


6 


919 


59,593 


1.20 


8,166 


581,274 


16 


2,936 


1.40 


5,094 


287,825 


6 


206 


4,361 


1.77 


9,452 


593,940 


32 


1,571 


1.59 


17,633 


1,649,310 


9 


425 


15,271 


1.07 


20,591 


1,049,743 


83 


1,114 


1.96 


13,599 


794,696 


12 


354 


6,307 


1.71 



k See introduction page 203 



236 



Municipal Electrical Service 



CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Customers 



Peak 
Load 
Decem- 
ber 
1968 



Residential Service 

(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



•gg 

idl 



Bolton* 

Bothwell* - 

Bowmanville . . 
Bracebridge . . . 
Bradford 

Braeside 

Brampton .... 

Brantford* 

Brantford Twp. 
Brechin 

Bridgeport .... 

Brigden 

Brighton 

Brockville* . . . 
Brussels 

Burford* 

Burgessville . . . 
Burk's Falls . . . 
Burlington .... 
Cache Bay 

Caledonia* 
Campbellford . . 
Campbellville . . 
Cannington* . . 
Capreol 

Cardinal 

Carleton Place . 
Casselman* . . . 

Cayuga 

Chalk River* . . 

Chapleau Twp.* 

Chatham 

Chatsworth . . . 

Chesley 

Chesterville . . . 

Chippawa* 

Clifford 

Clinton 

fCobalt 

Cobden 



2,390 

860 

8,442 

3,260 

2,771 

490 

37,324 

60,140 

9,214 

236 

2,236 
524 

2,729 

19,830 

836 

1,126 

298 

818 

75,930 

658 

2,944 
3,505 
258 
1,031 
3,151 

1,907 
4,938 
1,271 
1,039 
1,043 

3,658 

31,938 

383 

1,671 

1,269 

4,219 

532 

3,318 

2,018 

850 



731 

356 

2,831 

1,386 

988 

161 

9,302 

20,332 

2,824 

103 

600 

213 

1,120 

6,952 

394 

463 
109 
360 
20,185 
189 

983 

1,401 

91 

470 
1,075 

686 
1,862 
416 
417 
281 

1,054 

10,894 

199 

800 

493 

1,292 
247 

1,325 
746 
402 



kw 

2,376 

762 

12,595 

4,600 

3,312 

2,204 

43,898 

70,642 

11,257 

216 

1,920 

384 

3,075 

27,380 

1,008 

1,178 

327 

1,451 

81,133 

442 

1,908 
4,527 
255 
1,326 
3,118 

1,433 

5,315 

1,378 

872 

699 

2,422 

39,571 

438 

1,863 

2,065 

2,589 
566 
3,578 
1,680 
1,071 



$ 

73,214 

21,115 
240,424 
105,293 

74,752 

11,543 

1,013,456 

1,431,137 

356,228 

5,219 

72,644 

9,794 

85,971 

600,493 

31,453 

40,274 

8,857 

29,842 

2,236,576 

12,284 

58,471 

80,167 

9,190 

32,999 

110,106 

43,350 
144,265 
29,998 
28,096 
28,401 

114,703 

730,900 

13,117 

48,417 

35,569 

96,638 

18,303 
97,750 
63,395 
23,080 



kwh 

5,921,995 
1,788,310 
23,829,034 
9,129,150 
7,065,160 

975,042 

75,815,006 

115,586,985 

27,413,291 

549,900 

5,472,742 

846,020 

8,091,777 

50,344,439 

2,579,250 

3,524,063 

830,990 

2,586,006 

175,791,625 

1,025,110 

4,502,597 

10,277,493 

773,369 

3,287,490 

9,270,174 

3,910,466 
11,989,516 
2,548,177 
2,198,858 
2,251,080 

6,203,180 
47,241,288 
1,188,300 
4,774,540 
3,403,289 

7,039,864 
1,595,187 
8,527,220 
4,370,400 
2,572,366 



619 

283 

2,645 

1,134 

851 

154 

8,603 

18,222 

2,638 

89 

552 

189 

1,041 

6,113 

355 

380 

93 

328 

18,995 

186 

839 

1,252 

84 

399 
1,010 

640 
1,739 
336 
373 
256 

903 
9,371 
181 
663 
451 

1,192 
223 

1,190 
632 
370 



kwh 

§757 

§493 

753 

679 

709 

526 
737 
539 
874 
512 

822 
377 
652 
692 
608 

§737 
749 
647 
790 
479 

§426 
691 

776 
697 
777 

512 
574 

§617 
493 

§739 

§528 
424 
558 
606 
637 

§487 
602 
601 
583 
581 



* Municipalities so indicated have general rate in effect. See note on page 230 
f Retail service provided by The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
§ Estimated 



Statement D 



237 



AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1968 





Commercial Service 




Industrial Power Service 






(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 














AND WHERE APPLICABLE * SERVICE 
















UNDER GENERAL RATE 














Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Monthly • 
Consumption 
per Customer 


Av- 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Average of 
Customers' 
Monthly 
Loads Billed 


Monthly • 
Consumption 
per Customer 


Av- 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh A 


$ 


kwh 




kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 




kw 


kwh 


I 


46,249 


3,422,881 


112 


§4,564 


1.35 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


17,327 


1,088,870 


73 


§1,905 


1.59 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


98,845 


9,159,230 


164 


4,741 


1.08 


159,482 


19,269,677 


22 


5,390 


69,818 


0.83 


72,968 


5,460,682 


227 


2,041 


1.34 


24,789 


2,511,955 


25 


884 


8,373 


0.99 


40,749 


2,648,012 


107 


2,062 


1.54 


42,186 


3,897,189 


30 


1,184 


11,009 


1.08 


1,593 


105,160 


5 


1,753 


1.51 


67,357 


7,725,840 


2 


1,816 321,910 


0.87 


650,664 


47,838,422 


574 


7,119 


1.36 


685,708 


64,811,484 


125 


16,636 


43,556 


1.06 


2,105,972 


226,381,077 


2,110 


8,998 


0.93 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


91,608 


6,979,220 


119 


5,216 


1.31 


242,242 


21,347,838 


67 


7,072 


26,954 


1.13 


2,852 


233,250 


13 


1,495 


1.22 


440 


14,640 


1 


26 


1,220 


3.01 


28,806 


1,858,542 


41 


4,023 


1.55 


6,454 


284,430 


7 


183 


3,386 


2.27 


4,571 


342,490 


18 


1,543 


1.33 


5,386 


176,540 


6 


253 


2,263 


3.05 


35,366 


2,568,326 


68 


3,147 


1.38 


14,869 


1,171,501 


11 


446 


8,875 


1.27 


719,801 


75,524,236 


839 


7,619 


0.95 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


10,327 


620,620 


32 


1,567 


1.66 


6,383 


330,583 


7 


186 


3,444 


1.93 


23,202 


1,521,887 


83 


§2,642 


1.52 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


5,956 


265,690 


15 


1,476 


2.24 


1,364 


31,000 


1 


54 


2,583 


4.40 


13,535 


956,100 


28 


2,846 


1.42 


12,938 


1,009,000 


4 


341 


21,021 


1.28 


992,557 


74,113,370 


997 


6,598 


1.34 


974,121 


92,655,039 


193 


26,227 


40,962 


1.05 


1,759 


122,750 


3 


2,923 


1.43 


- 


- 


- 






- 


43,635 


3,210,471 


144 


§3,065 


1.36 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


49,621 


5,009,541 


128 


3,300 


0.99 


23,809 


2,766,894 


21 


1,003 


10,980 


0.86 


2,163 


153,233 


7 


1,824 


1.41 


- 


- 










13,136 


1,256,780 


71 


1,435 


1.05 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


27,838 


1,826,200 


55 


2,871 


1.52 


17,290 


1,825,470 


10 


383 


15,212 


0.95 


11,176 


777,251 


42 


1,542 


1.44 


1,259 


111,200 


4 


35 


2,317 


1.13 


57,029 


3,555,977 


108 


2,757 


1.60 


59,990 


6,041,731 


15 


1,634 


30,514 


0.99 


24,748 


1,860,049 


80 


§2,296 


1.33 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


14,572 


917,090 


34 


2,011 


1.59 


8,602 


292,040 


10 


313 


2,212 


2.95 


9,660 


704,990 


25 


§2,448 


1.37 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


57,288 


2,829,888 


151 


§3,111 


2.02 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


715,903 


40,031,270 


1,232 


2,657 


1.79 


1,092,852 


106,072,737 


291 


25,505 


30,428 


1.03 


4,968 


321,840 


17 


1,625 


1.54 


394 


9,750 


1 


20 


813 


4.04 


20,412 


1,390,428 


109 


1,053 


1.47 


15,461 


1,144,968 


28 


510 


3,408 


1.35 


9,913 


726,727 


33 


1,923 


1.36 


43,944 


4,489,568 


9 


1,184 


44,015 


0.98 


35,360 


2,591,870 


100 


§3,673 


1.36 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


4,411 


327,948 


17 


1,656 


1.35 


4,736 


391,310 


7 


117 


4,658 


1.21 


55,466 


3,777,400 


108 


2,915 


1.47 


27,163 


1,742,750 


27 


799 


5,586 


1.56 


27,821 


1,493,900 


107 


1,158 


1.86 


12,138 


1,059,400 


7 


284 


13,582 


1.15 


10,593 


781,334 


27 


2,368 


1.36 


4,468 


206,470 


5 


236 


3,441 


2.16 



A See introduction page 203 



238 



Municipal Electrical Service 



CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 
for the Year Ended 



Residential Service 

(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Customers 



Peak 
Load 
Decem- 
ber 
1968 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



•g| 



Cobourg 

Cochrane 

Colborne 

Coldwater* 

Collingwood .... 

Comber 

Coniston 

Cookstown 

Cottam 

Courtright 

Creemore 

Dashwood 

Deep River 

Delaware 

Delhi* 

Deseronto 

Dorchester 

Drayton 

Dresden 

Drumbo 

Dryden 

Dublin 

Dundalk 

Dundas 

Dunnville 

Durham 

Dutton 

East York 

Eganville 

fElk Lake Townsite 

Elmira 

Elmvale 

Elmwood 

Elora* 

Embro* 

Embrun 

fEnglehart 

Erieau 

Erie Beach 

Erin 



10,662 

4,480 

1,499 

759 

8,513 

579 
2,732 
715 
656 
666 

928 
435 

5,637 
437 

3,696 

1,800 

1,145 

686 

2,417 
447 

6,727 

309 

871 

15,868 

5,279 

2,166 

733 

97,069 

1,366 

§650 

4,333 
1,062 
§450 
1,684 
660 

1,274 
1,670 
456 
x212 
1,259 



3,535- 

1,418 

651 

329 

3,483 

245 
724 
283 
264 
234 

376 
194 

1,510 
154 

1,601 

626 
382 
285 
980 
180 

2,187 

127 

534 

5,121 

2,084 

951 
363 
25,039 
522 
219 

1,488 
457 
153 
597 
271 

370 
656 
385 
149 
498 



kw 

18,429 

4,515 

1,995 

1,194 

15,019 

462 
2,027 
826 
455 
391 

996 
532 

6,953 
407 

4,298 

1,645 

838 

727 

2,782 

384 

6,687 

480 

1,297 

15,843 

5,549 

2,741 

629 

56,915 

1,514 

521 

6,578 
1,387 

278 
1,565 

764 

1,602 
1,380 

547 

122 

1,249 



$ 

314,520 

120,709 

48,168 

27,597 

245,757 

14,354 
67,374 
22,262 
14,951 
15,508 

26,025 
18,371 
165,870 
15,387 
76,109 

44,163 
25,733 
25,834 
58,190 
13,931 

217,818 
8,931 

33,668 
457,737 

99,929 

67,801 
17,134 
1,577,723 
32,638 
18,744 

116,802 

30,815 

8,037 

51,203 

21,909 

44,509 
48,559 
21,478 
8,186 
43,826 



kwh 

29,549,508 
9,012,249 
4,344,852 
2,671,360 

22,865,330 

1,124,660 
5,863,223 
2,277,810 
1,268,120 
916,451 

2,587,050 
1,324,020 
16,564,320 
1,230,480 
7,287,075 

3,868,521 
2,253,690 
1,912,380 
4,492,377 
1,276,777 

17,175,116 
835,443 

3,017,840 
35,405,346 

7,902,301 

5,886,957 
1,325,431 
140,135,168 
2,783,252 
1,412,900 

10,606,655 

2,914,740 

744,510 

4,058,235 

1,993,496 

3,415,892 
3,141,800 
1,795,664 
377,410 
3,914,064 



3,203 

1,184 

533 

273 

3,171 

220 
702 
258 
239 
218 

346 
182 

1,377 
145 

1,310 

589 
362 
254 
888 
172 

2,049 

109 

475 

4,752 

1,828 

857 
336 
23,843 
460 
170 

1,344 
412 
142 
515 
221 

344 
545 
351 
142 
457 



kwh 

772 
631 
690 
§786 
594 

426 
705 
746 
444 
353 

628 

610 

1,001 

717 
469 

551 
520 
626 
423 
619 

698 
639 
540 
631 
362 

578 
332 
490 
511 
685 

669 
595 
438 
665 

767 

847 
481 
432 

223 
725 



* Municipalities so indicated have general rate in effect. See note on page 230 
f Retail service provided by The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
§ Estimated 



Statement D 



239 



AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1968 





Commercial Service 






Industrial Power Service 




(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 














AND WHERE APPLICABLE * SERVICE 
















UNDER GENERAL RATE 




















•IS 


Av- 








T3 


•11 


Av- 








•■c E 


erage 








° 55 3 


•S E 


erage 








iE« 


Cost 








&(=-« 


*E» 


Cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Monti 
Consu 
perCi 


per 
Kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Averaj 
Custoi 
Monti 
Loads 


Month 
Consu 
per Cu 


per 

Kwh A 


$ 


kwh 




kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 




kw 


kwh 


i 


197,868 


16,109,182 


312 


4,864 


1.23 


324,154 


41,375,513 


20 


9,032 


80,185 


0.78 


82,201 


5,279,827 


223 


2,023 


1.56 


45,763 


5,130,500 


11 


952 


38,867 


0.89 


27,774 


1,504,139 


103 


1,205 


1.85 


17,322 


1,360,453 


15 


404 


7,819 


1.27 


20,664 


1,573,788 


56 


§5,219 


1.31 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


120,482 


9,703,569 


227 


3,618 


1.24 


315,169 


35,714,102 


85 


8,744 


37,202 


0.88 


7,308 


455,110 


18 


1,945 


1.61 


5,561 


198,390 


7 


219 


2,362 


2.80 


9,816 


603,190 


17 


2,957 


1.63 


3,799 


257,770 


5 


102 


4,774 


1.47 


4,020 


272,790 


20 


1,196 


1.47 


2,305 


149,140 


5 


94 


2,486 


1.55 


3,637 


242,720 


17 


1,156 


1.50 


4,782 


102,520 


8 


248 


1,068 


4.66 


6,629 


396,950 


14 


2,363 


1.67 


760 


79,130 


2 


15 


3,297 


0.96 


8,228 


637,040 


25 


2,082 


1.29 


2,195 


123,500 


5 


101 


2,058 


1.78 


2,742 


155,530 


8 


1,620 


1.76 


10,802 


548,790 


4 


289 


11,433 


1.97 


104,948 


7,741,427 


128 


4,906 


1.36 


13,272 


1,034,800 


5 


422 


15,679 


1.28 


4,340 


209,600 


9 


2,055 


2.07 










- 




108,430 


8,401,975 


291 


2,414 


1.29 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


11,063 


765,247 


24 


2,603 


1.45 


28,161 


2,138,203 


13 


818 


13,706 


1.32 


4,651 


255,650 


16 


1,253 


1.82 


6,365 


325,710 


4 


220 


6,786 


1.95 


6,854 


400,933 


28 


1,193 


1.71 


4,503 


198,020 


3 


135 


5,501 


2.27 


33,121 


2,084,780 


69 


2,694 


1.59 


93,312 


7,635,207 


23 


2,381 


27,664 


1.22 


1,793 


87,520 


6 


1,216 


2.05 


856 


26,315 


2 


41 


1,096 


3.25 


137,188 


9,325,817 


133 


5,714 


1.47 


8,427 


688,100 


5 


191 


11,468 


1.22 


5,382 


391,390 


16 


2,174 


1.38 


7,726 


341,440 


2 


205 


14,227 


2.26 


15,747 


1,005,210 


43 


2,018 


1.57 


11,420 


749,464 


16 


409 


4,029 


1.52 


194,517 


14,197,675 


262 


4,733 


1.37 


178,114 


15,120,642 


107 


5,419 


11,944 


1.18 


90,115 


6,291,533 


220 


2,444 


1.43 


114,206 


10,423,966 


36 


3,562 


22,860 


1.10 


30,152 


2,127,760 


70 


2,646 


1.42 


38,428 


2,717,470 


24 


1,199 


9,436 


1.41 


6,815 


480,090 


20 


2,000 


1.42 


4,599 


186,227 


7 


177 


1,940 


2.47 


769,816 


69,547,257 


1,104 


5,288 


1.11 


437,709 


47,648,725 


92 


11,575 


42,468 


0.92 


72,754 


1,329,546 


54 


1,996 


1.71 


13,414 


1,102,931 


8 


323 


11,489 


1.22 


8,838 


584,000 


48 


936 


1.51 


845 


26,400 


1 


29 


1,467 


3.20 


56,374 


3,606,204 


101 


3,098 


1.56 


167,715 


16,054,091 


43 


4,512 


31,853 


1.04 


24,009 


1,768,290 


31 


4,912 


1.36 


4,546 


269,008 


14 


169 


1,601 


1.69 


1,743 


106,056 


10 


982 


1.64 


2,031 


86,000 


1 


67 


7,167 


2.36 


27,014 


1,965,865 


82 


2,074 


1.37 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


9,454 


666,265 


50 


1,110 


1.42 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


15,436 


1,054,960 


19 


4,508 


1.46 


7,898 


418,650 


7 


278 


4,984 


1.89 


30,818 


1,764,700 


106 


1,387 


1.75 


8,262 


720,400 


5 


183 


12,007 


1.15 


7,588 


529,250 


30 


1,470 


1.43 


4,306 


215,925 


4 


129 


3,999 


1.99 


778 


31,580 


7 


376 


2.46 




- 


- 


- 




- 


14,406 


993,945 


34 


2,436 


1.45 


4,944 


260,600 


7 


178 


2,896 


1.90 



A See introduction page 203 



240 



Municipal Electrical Service 



CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Customers 



Peak 
Load 
Decem- 
ber 
1968 



RESIDENTIAL SERVICE 
(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



Ml 

IN 

o o S 
Sua. 



Espanola 

Essex 

Etobicoke 

Exeter 

Fenelon Falls . . 

Fergus 

Finch* 

Flesherton 

Fonthill* 

Forest 

Fort William . . 
Frankford 

Gait 

Georgetown 
fGeraldton .... 

Glencoe 

Gloucester Twp. 

Goderich 

fGogama 

Grand Bend 

Grand Valley . . . 

Granton 

Gravenhurst* . . . 

Grimsby 

Guelph 

Hagersville* 

fHaileybury 

Hamilton 

Hanover 

Harriston* 

Harrow* 

Hastings* 

Havelock 

Hawkesbury* . . . 
Hearst 

Hensall 

fHepworth 

Hespeler* 

Highgate 

Holstein 



5,639 

3,785 

266,117 

3,170 

1,457 

5,008 

379 

510 

2,937 

2,237 

48,615 

1,861 

34,996 

14,523 

3,128 

1,230 
23,066 
6,660 
§500 
x643 

848 

327 

3,264 

6,773 

53,329 

2,222 
2,863 
291,187 
4,833 
1,640 

1,878 
838 
1,214 
9,049 
3,280 

916 
335 
5,942 
390 
172 



1,582 

1,282 

84,974 

1,414 

884 

1,735 
173 
250 
994 
943 

15,708 
681 

10,785 
4,486 
1,166 

605 

6,327 

2,668 

168 

881 

368 

125 

1,487 

2,324 

15,962 

867 
1,034 



kw 

5,039 
3,182 
330,686 
3,755 
2,292 

9,980 

445 

940 

2,264 

2,350 

49,244 

1,679 

44,752 

17,020 

2,190 

1,230 

30,793 

9,363 

411 

878 

985 

255 

3,840 

5,401 

76,874 

2,579 
2,906 



94,109 598,659 



1,900 
720 

758 
421 
478 
2,521 
899 

387 

130 

1,817 

177 

99 



7,790 
2,059 

2,578 
922 
1,111 
8,078 
4,586 

1,359 
529 

8,515 
404 
181 



$ 

159,788 

89,829 

7,448,258 

123,791 

62,220 

147,035 
11,253 
16,830 
70,514 
70,790 

1,014,163 

51,585 

946,943 

348,823 

84,506 

27,759 

754,053 

184,052 

19,286 

53,864 

25,150 

10,586 

97,016 

160,224 

1,631,044 

51,329 

91,682 

6,203,745 

127,703 

56,398 

66,871 
28,917 
33,225 
214,621 
89,421 

26,344 

11,679 

134,026 

7,659 

5,888 



kwh 

14,048,653 
7,703,553 
649,230,990 
9,878,478 
4,913,840 

12,556,513 

946,853 

1,892,440 

6,077,932 

6,848,466 

119,362,103 

5,025,748 

77,867,640 

30,121,225 

5,315,400 

2,419,905 

55,937,983 

16,792,465 

805,000 

2,771,195 

2,271,090 

720,360 

8,935,625 

12,450,969 

124,926,868 

4,052,670 
6,554,800 
524,967,128 
12,571,351 
4,564,964 

5,893,510 
2,336,628 
3,057,181 
18,962,085 
7,177,310 

2,406,120 

843,200 

10,814,104 

649,520 

539,900 



1,491 

1,150 

79,776 

1,244 

757 

1,577 
131 
220 
907 
857 

13,856 
633 

10,040 

4,214 

968 

533 

5,908 

2,442 

139 

764 

339 

109 

1,264 

2,109 

14,717 

682 

863 

83,941 

1,627 

591 

596 
352 
442 
2,239 
813 

322 

112 

1,613 

156 

79 



kwh 

804 
564 
680 
678 
561 

680 
§527 
704 
578 
675 

720 
670 
650 
629 
455 

395 
851 
579 
484 
304 

568 
556 
§569 
497 
717 

506 
644 
525 
651 
§603 

§776 

§505 

586 

§700 

773 

630 
636 
§571 
350 
570 



* Municipalities so indicated have general rate in effect. See note on page 230 
f Retail service provided by The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
§ Estimated 



Statement D 



241 



AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1968 





Commercial Service 




Industrial Power Service 


(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 










AND WHERE APPLICABLE * SERVICE 












UNDER GENERAL RATE 
















• g § 


Av- 








•o 


• §s 


Av- 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Monthly 
Consumpti 
per Custon 


erage 
Cost 
per 
Kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Average of 
Customers' 
Monthly 
Loads Bille 


Monthly 
Consumpti 
per Custom 


erage 
Cost 
per 

Kwh A 


$ 


kwh 




kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 




kw 


kwh 


i 


59,677 


4,494,928 


86 


4,257 


1.33 


4,541 


329,920 


5 


141 


5,499 


1.38 


67,664 


4,668,516 


102 


3,796 


1.45 


30,296 


1,691,164 


30 


1,100 


4,207 


1.79 


3,665,645 


280,480,175 


3,842 


6,215 


1.31 


6,666,243 


711,016,013 


1,356 


170,032 


44,701 


0.94 


40,369 


2,418,159 


122 


1,659 


1.67 


56,426 


3,920,001 


48 


1,543 


6,877 


1.44 


40,614 


2,719,268 


113 


1,988 


1.49 


6,496 


401,910 


14 


209 


2,392 


1.62 


38,448 


2,376,104 


116 


1,808 


1.62 


227,826 


24,048,075 


42 


5,887 


50,100 


0.95 


7,642 


434,651 


42 


§1,662 


1.76 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


10,109 


886,960 


28 


2,738 


1.14 


1,564 


95,480 


2 


75 


3,978 


1.64 


32,745 


2,166,372 


87 


§1,984 


1.51 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


31,899 


2,422,110 


66 


3,204 


1.32 


17,490 


1,290,075 


20 


634 


5,375 


1.36 


704,387 


70,532,326 


1,768 


3,500 


1.00 


509,837 


54,325,016 


84 


19,393 


37,260 


0.94 


10,409 


831,532 


41 


1,711 


1.25 


3,627 


332,800 


7 


142 


4,267 


1.09 


350,818 


26,371,500 


591 


3,802 


1.33 


980,032 


104,578 222 


154 


27,066 


57,335 


0.94 


113,847 


7,980,418 


216 


3,410 


1.43 


299,193 


33,504,143 


56 


8,042 


50,764 


0.89 


66,529 


3,979,200 


185 


1,788 


1.67 


2,810 


148,600 


13 


78 


917 


1.89 


21,208 


1,359,145 


52 


2,178 


1.56 


17,728 


960,908 


20 


609 


4,215 


1.84 


608,591 


57,253,766 


370 


14,371 


1.06 


189,645 


13,724,476 


49 


5,357 


24,596 


1.38 


64,988 


4,805,888 


163 


2,503 


1.35 


227,320 


22,412,037 


63 


6,356 


27,876 


1.01 


8,237 


400,500 


27 


1,309 


2.06 


12,107 


619,900 


2 


216 


25,829 


1.95 


31,830 


1,877,593 


117 


1,337 


1.70 


- 


- 










7,931 


451,220 


23 


1,671 


1.76 


4,924 


275,660 


6 


188 


4,177 


1.79 


1,879 


77,620 


16 


404 


2.42 




- 










78,343 


6,817,761 


223 


§3,839 


1.15 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


108,075 


7,480,571 


190 


3,352 


1.44 


47,019 


2,910,435 


25 


1,370 


9,511 


1.62 


811,045 


55,388,057 


1,119 


4,121 


1.46 


1,746,800 


184,637,283 


126 


42,912 


118,357 


0.95 


94,259 


7,003,387 


185 


§3,050 


1.35 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


55,234 


3,151,000 


161 


1,641 


1.75 


8,174 


596,000 


10 


208 


5,519 


1.37 


4,533,454 


376,262,265 


9,256 


3,421 


1.20 


18,719,363 


2,728,331,642 


912 


462,026 


245,530 


0.69 


76,858 


5,591,716 


234 


1,962 


1.37 


113,490 


12,084 799 


39 


4,008 


25,822 


0.94 


58,271 


4,798,883 


129 


§4,761 


1.21 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


69,467 


4,739,920 


162 


§3,780 


1.47 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


17,563 


1,243,845 


69 


§3,301 


1.41 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


12,175 


897,861 


33 


2,267 


1.36 


1,141 


89,075 


3 


33 


2,969 


1.28 


180,513 


13,779,271 


282 


§5,904 


1.31 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


44,975 


3,097,818 


73 


3,585 


1.45 


70,354 


4,925,203 


13 


1,896 


31,572 


1.43 


13,295 


758,645 


49 


1,277 


1.75 


26,529 


1,761,540 


16 


816 


8,897 


1.51 


5,234 


274,425 


17 


1,345 


1.91 


1,105 


49,700 


1 


44 


4,142 


2.22 


268,277 


27,415,930 


204 


§12,900 


0.98 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


3,622 


265,870 


18 


1,198 


1.36 


3,361 


115,190 


3 


103 


3,200 


2.92 


1,249 


73,900 


18 


352 


1:69 


854 


36,300 


2 


18 


1,513 


2.35 



A See introduction page 203 



242 



Municipal Electrical Service 



CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Customers 



Peak 
Load 
Decem- 
ber 
1968 



Residential Service 

(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



I IS 

o o S 
Sua 



Av 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh 



fHornepayne 

fHudson 

Huntsville 

Ingersoll* 

Iroquois 

Jarvis 

f Jellicoe 

Kapuskasing 

fKearns 

Kemptville 

Kenora (incl. Keewatin) 

Killaloe Station 

Kincardine 

King City 

fKing Kirkland 

Kingston 

Kingsville* 

Kirkfield 

f Kirkland Lake (incl. Swastika) 
Kitchener 

Lakefield 

Lambeth 

Lanark* 

Lancaster* 

Larder Lake Twp 

Latchford 

Leamington* 

Lindsay* 

Listowel 

London* 

L'Orignal 

Lucan 

Lucknow 

Lynden 

Madoc 

Magnetawan* 

Markdale 

Markham 

Marmora 

Martintown 



1,725 
§600 

3,275 
7,401 
1,137 

861 

§200 

12,472 

§500 

2,171 

13,002 

853 
2,744 
1,960 
§600 

56,159 

3,583 

199 

§18,000 

99,021 

2,162 

2,819 

906 

565 

1,351 

477 

9,567 

11,756 

4,483 

202,542 

1,295 
1,047 
1,017 
581 
1,294 

176 
1,058 
8,724 
1,284 

377 



500 

213 

1,342 

2,516 

442 

314 

65 

2,287 

153 

933 

4,545 
296 

1,374 
564 
188 

19,367 

1,530 

117 

5,918 

31,122 



829 
301 
220 
470 

156 

3,609 

4,417 

1,789 

64,122 

438 
411 
490 
183 
627 

121 
517 
2,589 
529 
123 



kw 

1,456 
334 
4,352 
8,734 
1,540 

577 

80 

6,372 

417 
3,234 

11,445 

720 

3,496 

1,932 

498 

68,614 

3,931 

198 

12,574 

135,256 

2,606 

2,029 

835 

612 

1,124 

405 

10,908 

18,091 

6,027 

217,819 

1,133 
1,081 
1,295 
584 
1,664 

198 

1,334 

10,324 

1,471 

224 



$ 

64,616 
16,149 
99,465 
166,801 
36,092 

17,906 

4,991 

186,963 

12,868 

79,800 

333,678 
22,350 
97,120 
66,041 
19,834 

1,446,427 

92,515 

7,959 

416,133 

2,341,640 

70,089 

80,395 
17,542 
14,848 
42,328 

10,910 

215,075 

323,401 

131,950 

5,301,883 

36,239 
37,701 
28,692 
16,480 

37,444 

5,817 

32,842 

291,019 

41,510 

6,655 



kwh 

3,786,800 

935,300 

9,137,240 

11,931,058 

3,580,940 

1,303,980 

292,000 

16,141,123 

929,000 

6,744,203 

31,217,032 
1,458,300 
9,074,970 
5,517,923 
1,522,700 

133,727,346 

8,019,600 

593,606 

29,460,100 

211,511,557 

6,295,038 
5,944,161 
1,825,264 
1,281,900 
3 544,290 

,902,783 

17,988,530 

30,820,430 

12,489,876 

367,076,830 

2,940,619 
2,924,495 
2,759,470 
1,541,905 
3,936,188 

397,866 

3,109,826 

22,673,523 

3,526,997 

565,100 



432 

179 

1,195 

2,190 

384 

287 

54 

2,110 

139 

860 

4,206 

272 

1,241 

537 

165 

16,478 

1,300 

110 

5,005 

29,027 

764 
800 
260 
176 
414 



3,030 

3,767 

1,623 

58,553 

408 
364 
385 
175 
546 



421 

2,405 

487 

106 



kwh 

732 
435 
643 
453 
792 

386 
451 
652 
508 
667 

624 1.07 
444 1.53 
611 
857 
733 

679 
§502 
469 
484 
620 

692 

625 
§538 
§605 

719 

510 
§470 
§654 

647 

529 

602 
672 
595 
745 
608 

§341 
643 
821 
609 
444 



* Municipalities so indicated have general rate in effect. See note on page 230 
j Retail service provided by The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
§ Estimated 



Statement D 



243 



AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1968 





Commercial Service 




Industrial Power Service 




(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 










AND WHERE APPLICABLE * SERVICE 












UNDER GENERAL RATE 










Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Monthly • 
Consumption 
per Customer 


Av- 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Average of 
Customers' 
Monthly 
Loads Billed 


Monthly • 
Consumption 
per Customer 


Av- 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh A 


$ 


kwh 




kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 




kw 


kwh 


i 


34,901 


1,560,500 


66 


1,898 


2.24 


12,690 


819,100 


2 


170 


34,129 


1.55 


9,304 


474,400 


34 


1,198 


1.96 


- 


- 










64,836 


5,516,940 


112 


4,317 


1.18 


25,747 


2,432,070 


35 


1,014 


5,961 


1.06 


256,365 


26,120,318 


326 


6,802 


0.98 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


24,090 


1,896,516 


53 


2,982 


1.27 


4,842 


369,950 


5 


184 


6,166 


1.31 


7,896 


511,383 


20 


2,243 


1.54 


5,592 


218,023 


7 


162 


2,596 


2.56 


2,524 


133,300 


11 


1,010 


1.89 




- 


- 








124,143 


8,532,142 


151 


4,837 


1.46 


9,353 


725,962 


26 


344 


1,984 


1.29 


3,353 


215,200 


13 


1,435 


1.56 


583 


25,200 


1 


15 


2,100 


2.31 


56,408 


4,057,016 


61 


5,931 


1.39 


32,743 


2,110,958 


12 


1,006 


14,073 


1.55 


232,329 


13,886,513 


247 


4,832 


1.67 


48,048 


3,019,122 


92 


1,318 


2,705 


1.59 


10,177 


661,552 


24 


2,450 


1.54 


- 


- 


- 


- 






38,150 


2,466,592 


108 


1,930 


1.55 


35,612 


2,478,052 


25 


975 


8,098 


1.44 


25,185 


1,920,938 


23 


7,445 


1.31 


2,627 


201,087 


4 


69 


4,189 


1.31 


3,838 


283,200 


23 


1,004 


1.36 




- 


- 






- 


1,315,190 


111,801,538 


2,719 


3,482 


1.18 


589,869 


69,787,407 


170 


17,694 


33,714 


0.85 


82,650 


6,541,300 


230 


§3,071 


1.26 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


1,111 


52,390 


7 


624 


2.12 


- 


- 










249,256 


17,088,600 


886 


1,553 


1.46 


39,429 


3,658,400 


27 


990 


11,291 


1.08 


1,743,996 


132,604,657 


1,826 


6,132 


1.32 


2,690,432 


280,141,603 


269 


67,613 


86,144 


0.96 


55,253 


3,564,302 


75 


3,987 


1.55 


9,341 


688,657 


9 


286 


6,376 


1.36 


17,155 


1,070,276 


27 


3,243 


1.60 


2,860 


211,008 


2 


63 


8.792 


1.36 


11,607 


852,907 


41 


§4,636 


1.36 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


9,791 


784,170 


44 


§1,485 


1.25 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


12,365 


744,560 


52 


1,266 


1.66 


1,561 


149,530 


4 


30 


3,115 


1.04 


5,143 


413,801 


7 


4,926 


1.24 


37 


60 


1 


3 






370,537 


35,614,600 


579 


§8,309 


1.04 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


520,491 


56,468,321 


650 


§10,749 


0.92 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


87,976 


6,627,937 


136 


3,974 


1.33 


62,804 


5,362,341 


30 


1,905 


14,415 


1.17 


6,617,145 


643,762,972 


5,569 


9,825 


1.03 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


18,781 


1,367,914 


28 


4,071 


1.37 


897 


24,717 


2 


48 


1,029 


3.63 


12,766 


820,919 


38 


2,243 


1.56 


7,095 


356,100 


9 


220 


3,297 


1.99 


15,204 


1,007,458 


94 


903 


1.51 


20,485 


1,052,727 


11 


509 


7,628 


1.95 


2,660 


213,409 


5 


3,557 


1.25 


6,174 


543,725 


3 


193 


15,103 


1.14 


24,670 


1,853,516 


70 


2,376 


1.33 


6,715 


434,973 


11 


251 


3,295 


1.54 


3,120 


212,354 


33 


§962 


1.47 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


21,655 


1,412,471 


88 


1,293 


1.53 


7,314 


576,750 


8 


222 


6,008 


1.27 


108,876 


7,742,059 


157 


4,316 


1.41 


80,801 


7,429,737 


27 


2,059 


24,280 


1.09 


16,074 


1,065,972 


36 


2,468 


1.51 


2,889 


237,355 


6 


76 


3,297 


1.22 


2,694 


184,300 


15 


1,024 


1.46 


722 


16,000 


2 


44 


667 


4.51 



A See introduction page 203 



244 



Municipal Electrical Service 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 
for the Year Ended 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Customers 



Peak 
Load 
Decem- 
ber 
1968 



Residential Service 

(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



•2| 

las. 



Massey* . . . 
fMatachewan 
fMatheson . . 
jMattawa . . . 

Maxville* . . 



McGarry Twp. 
Meaford 

Merlin 

Merrickville . 
Midland* . . . 



Mildmay . 
Millbrook . 
Milton* . . 
Milverton . 
Mississauga 



Mitchell* 

Moorefield 
Morrisburg 
Mount Brydges 
Mount Forest . . 



Napanee 
Nepean Twp. 
Neustadt . . . 
Newboro* . . 
Newburgh . . 



Newbury 
Newcastle . . . 
New Hamburg 
fNew Liskeard . 
Newmarket . . 



Niagara .... 
Niagara Falls 
Nipigon Twp. 
North Bay* . 
North York . 



Norwich . . 
Norwood . 
Oakville* . 
Oil Springs 
Omemee . 



1,313 

§800 

812 

2,826 

771 

2,054 

3,934 

627 

914 

10,477 

951 

881 

6,552 

1,085 

121,730 

2,389 
291 
1,940 
1,150 
2,804 

4,717 

53,115 

542 

299 

594 

300 
1,552 
2,553 
5,137 
9,544 

3,088 
56,851 

2,680 

46,392 

420,177 

1,705 

1,058 

55,531 

544 

842 



391 

242 
310 
837 
325 

418 

1,666 

284 

359 

3,632 

359 

343 

1,886 

499 

32,501 

1,027 
149 
804 
433 

1,254 

1,814 

13,476 

227 

169 

200 

150 

601 

923 

1,883 

3,031 

1,183 

17,931 

791 

14,709 

122,324 

721 
438 
15,675 
251 
330 



kw 

1,139 

379 

1,024 

2,843 

988 

1,082 

5,323 

557 

930 

14,153 

743 

827 

8,507 

1,382 

191,035 

3,329 
440 

2,207 
806 

3,830 

4,826 

66,501 

622 

253 

448 

311 

1,791 

2,854 

5,893 

12,096 

2,652 
54,897 

2,319 

48,986 

460,729 

1,265 

1,035 

105,494 

515 

753 



$ 

36,782 
17,212 
21,032 
101,802 
21,663 

38,565 

117,511 

14,677 

26,933 

249,458 

29,238 

33,202 

167,328 

36,709 

3,794,768 

74,892 
11,018 
61,937 
28,347 
98,597 

110,809 

1,893,104 

15,622 

11,051 

16,946 

7,386 

54,095 

83,403 

165,670 

248,144 

91,493 
1,409,027 

61,856 

1,233,538 

11,264,456 

45,127 
31,464 
1,752,322 
10,745 
25,248 



kwh 

2,812,279 

1,243,200 

1,525,300 

6,459,700 

1,916,390 

3,278,376 
9,525,884 
1,290,172 
2,174,504 
23,666,332 

2,473,152 

2,464,211 

14,853,801 

3,003,893 

312,184,006 

6,051,093 

946,380 

5,598,849 

2,057,442 
9,419,560 

10,933,356 

148,854,721 

1,322,760 

710,400 

1,268,530 

600,650 

4,490,381 

7,873,810 

11,704,800 

22,828,482 

7,694,528 
103,292,221 

5,340,600 
100,202,566 
936,053,739 

3,867,160 

3,057,299 

134,980,798 

861,030 

1,929,082 



330 
209 
246 

712 
254 

376 

1,418 

217 

337 

3,212 

325 

323 

1,609 

426 

30,630 

861 
136 
710 
400 
1,141 

1,636 

12,493 

187 

149 

172 

138 

541 

844 

1,567 

2,691 

1,090 

16,698 

647 

12,755 

112,817 

608 
405 
13,616 
207 
306 



kwh 

729 
458 
515 
§736 
575 

723 
559 
505 
532 
§635 

650 
638 
§745 
593 
879 

597 
582 
665 
445 
701 

557 
1,011 
564 
401 
613 

367 
699 
805 
631 
709 

591 
520 
684 
§663 
697 

534 
635 
835 
350 
539 



♦Municipalities so indicated have general rate in effect. See note on page 230 
f Retail service provided by The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
§ Estimated 



Statement D 



245 



AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1968 





Commercial Service 




INDUSTRIAL POWER SERVICE 




(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 












AND WHERE APPLICABLE * SERVICE 














UNDER GENERAL RATE 


















• o g 


Av- 








•a 


• § | 


Av- 








£ E 

Q. o 


erage 








o2 3 


•v E 


erage 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Monthly 
Consum] 
per Cust 


Cost 

per 
Kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Average 
Custome 
Monthly 
Loads Bi 


Monthly 
Consum] 
per Cust 


Cost 

per 

Kwh A 


$ 


kwh 




kwh 


I 


$ 


kwh 




kw 


kwh 


i 


14,327 


1,132,584 


61 


1,547 


1.26 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


5,309 


322,600 


33 


738 


1.65 




- 










19,540 


1,249,900 


62 


1,653 


1.56 


15,604 


1,132,800 


2 


359 


47,200 


1.38 


87,636 


4,793,300 


125 


§2,986 


1.83 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


22,543 


1,410,784 


71 


2,424 


1.60 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


10,590 


651,657 


40 


1,341 


1.63 


1,903 


170,110 


2 


52 


7,088 


1.12 


53,174 


3,704,021 


212 


1,456 


1.44 


86,470 


7,523,368 


36 


2,130 


17,177 


1.15 


11,897 


763,113 


61 


1,034 


1.56 


9,120 


347,870 


6 


260 


5,271 


2.62 


5,591 


399,180 


14 


2,294 


1.40 


11,335 


804,490 


8 


413 


8,380 


1.41 


373,931 


40,355,046 


420 


§13,345 


0.93 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


8,291 


477,593 


27 


1,447 


1.74 


3,937 


225,554 


7 


144 


2,506 


1.75 


9,222 


455,302 


20 


1,946 


2.03 






- 


- 






220,615 


20,961,085 


277 


§7,868 


1.05 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


22,853 


1,317,576 


54 


2,174 


1.73 


14,636 


918,601 


19 


478 


4,138 


1.59 


1,848,571 


139,603,666 


1,443 


8,672 


1.32 


4,444,326 


492,115,282 


428 


96,744 


97,875 


0.90 


99,561 


8,001,753 


166 


4,078 


1.24 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


2,540 


136,020 


11 


1,030 


1.87 


9,315 


705,000 


2 


210 


29,375 


1.32 


29,130 


2,135,248 


84 


2,131 


1.36 


16,755 


1,156,522 


10 


482 


9,638 


1.45 


7,638 


448,550 


27 


1,411 


1.70 


8,116 


534,070 


6 


223 


7,418 


1.52 


36,651 


2,727,090 


80 


2,859 


1.34 


18,238 


1,357,480 


33 


630 


3,481 


1.34 


70,921 


5,880,233 


139 


3,525 


1.21 


49,202 


4,343,818 


39 


1,854 


9,282 


1.13 


1,071.574 


83,612,282 


919 


7,785 


1.28 


342,512 


34,101,202 


64 


7,527 


46,586 


1.00 


4,023 


296,720 


38 


899 


1.36 


4,426 


200,800 


2 


163 


6,693 


2.20 


2,718 


184,835 


20 


790 


1.47 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


5,510 


236,945 


24 


840 


2.33 


3,055 


130,400 


4 


89 


2,717 


2.34 


5,356 


462,840 


10 


3,857 


1.16 


3,621 


141,090 


2 


137 


5,879 


2.57 


17,216 


1,067,834 


46 


1,914 


1.61 


16,342 


1,340,673 


14 


418 


8,276 


1.22 


25,479 


1,684,805 


55 


2,507 


1.51 


30,309 


2,070,408 


24 


916 


7,668 


1.46 


142,585 


8,532,900 


296 


2,390 


1.67 


62,039 


4,210,600 


20 


1,453 


16,320 


1.47 


204,210 


16,019,989 


299 


4,443 


1.27 


116,205 


11,152,330 


41 


3,260 


23,234 


1.04 


37,451 


2,475,303 


75 


2,845 


1.51 


15,331 


963,900 


18 


424 


4,590 


1.59 


1,353,494 


104,900,619 


1,138 


7,682 


1.29 


572,667 


54,503,137 


95 


14,031 


47,810 


1.05 


63,658 


5,355,827 


144 


3,047 


1.19 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


1,308,674 


118,277,892 


1,954 


§5,649 


1.11 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


8,795,313 


714,536,165 


8,267 


7,430 


1.23 


4,386,752 


411,839,779 


1,240 


115,316 


28,340 


1.07 


17,444 


984,900 


101 


821 


1.77 


5,049 


408,360 


12 


134 


2,836 


1.24 


9,248 


707,957 


30 


1,934 


1.31 


4,181 


228,260 


3 


163 


6,341 


1.83 


4,092,387 


490,688,272 


2,059 


20,035 


0.83 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


2,818 


166,130 


15 


865 


1.70 


12,145 


1,257,910 


29 


267 


3,437 


0.97 


10,256 


542,846 


21 


2,154 


1.89 


5,617 


367,200 


3 


120 


8,743 


1.53 



A See introduction page 203 



246 



Municipal Electrical Service 

CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Customers 



Peak 
Load 
Decem- 
ber 
1968 



Residential Service 

(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



° 1 

1|0 

idl 



Orangeville* 

Orillia 

Orono 

Oshawa* 

Ottawa (incl. Vanier and 
Rockcliffe Park) 

Otterville 

Owen Sound 

Paisley* 

Palmerston 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke* 

Penetanguishene* 

Perth 

Peterborough* 

Petrolia 

Pickering 

■(•Pickle Lake Landing . . . 
Picton 

Plantagenet* 

Plattsville* 

Point Edward 

Port Arthur* 

Port Burwell 

fPortCarling 

Port Colborne* 

Port Credit* 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope 

Port McNicoIl* 

Port Perry ' 

Port Rowan 

Port Stanley 

fPowassan 

Prescott 

Preston 

Priceville 

Princeton* 



6,649 

20,532 

987 

82,324 

318,014 

807 

18,259 

708 

1,659 

6,428 

1,160 
5,670 
15,142 
5,003 
5,334 

54,782 
3,469 
1,966 
§350 
4,694 

855 

558 

2,823 

46,990 

661 

x552 
18,168 
8,261 
3,288 
2,055 

8,734 

1,259 

2,746 

841 

xl,470 

1,079 

5,518 

14,644 

136 

434 



kw 

2,539 7,183 

7,294 28,350 

392 | 1,101 

24,823 138,313 

I 

100,503 388,464 



299 

6,411 

328 

716 

2,229 



| 597 

22,983 

920 

1,920 

6,168 



527 1,387 

2,235 7,200 

5,109 14,592 

1,514 5,013 

2,175 6,663 



17,759 

1,446 

606 

137 

1,847 

260 
208 
901 
14,902 
429 



75,270 

3,702 

1,673 

432 

5,558 

913 

1,127 

6,310 

63,378 

411 



599 830 

5,611 15,286 

2,804 19,211 

1,574 2,814 

1,264 2,958 

3,053 12,352 



627 
1,056 

366 
1,163 

407 
1,936 
4,261 

74 
183 



1,620 

3,587 

550 

1,495 

1,404 

5,965 

15,857 

90 

486 



$ 

196,481 

474,978 

38,094 

2,331,802 

6,389,574 

20,887 

522,280 

22,296 

53,058 

145,631 

37,526 
214,432 
415,758 
120,586 
149,440 

1,770,199 

91,613 

59,583 

9,176 

141,574 

24,031 
14,713 
51,529 
1,105,109 
26,994 

51,389 
365,654 
202,855 

86,224 
106,800 

278,954 
41,897 
99,003 
18,781 

77,441 

42,294 

121,655 

345,265 

4,849 

12,234 



kwh 

15,696,370 

47,976,128 

2,925,873 

219,353,189 

776,066,587 

1,719,225 

51,093,969 

1,964,340 

4,324,347 

11,428,574 

3,057,860 
18,532,742 
36,087,748 
11,496,510 
13,320,332 

149,183,708 

6,923,400 

4,622,760 

609,800 

12,516,034 

1,748,465 
1,430,350 
3,832,673 
105,856,438 
1,280,300 

3,021,000 

25,942,160 

18,209,783 

6,428,463 

8,675,642 

23,848,847 
3,674,680 
9,097,292 
1,414,090 
5,181,481 

3,278,900 

12,796,658 

29,687,836 

271,890 

1,243,555 



2,174 

6,412 

364 

22,194 

88,671 

260 

5,958 

257 

641 

1,943 

463 
2,000 
4,433 
1,316 
1,998 

15,894 

1,215 

566 

92 

1,533 

211 
167 
792 
13,291 
401 

520 
4,997 
2,295 
1,455 
1,135 

2,864 
600 
908 
319 

1,131 

324 

1,807 

3,937 

68 

139 



kwh 
§615 

633 
671 
817 

732 

552 
721 
§619 
564 
491 

555 
780 
680 
734 
558 

§761 
475 
693 
577 
686 

§697 
718 
403 
665 
265 

485 
433 
§605 
370 
646 

697 

§508 

§800 

374 

383 

849 
594 
634 
331 
762 



* Municipalities so indicate >ve general rate in effect. See note on page 230 
t Retail service provide , : Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 

§ Estimated 
x Excluding summer population 



Statement D 



247 



AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1968 





Commercial Service 




Industrial Power Service 




(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 












AND WHERE APPLICABLE * SERVICE 














UNDER GENERAL RATE 












Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Monthly • 
Consumption 
per Customer 


Av- 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Average of 
Customers' 
Monthly 
Loads Billed 


Monthly • 
Consumption 
per Customer 


Av- 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh A 


$ 


kwh 




kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 




kw 


kwh 


i 


155,940 


12,780,104 


365 


§4,123 


1.22 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


267,441 


21,597,633 


746 


2,477 


1.24 


450,572 


49,330,904 


136 


18,431 


30,451 


0.91 


10,901 


671,484 


23 


2,665 


1.62 


11,140 


729,950 


5 


256 


11,060 


1.53 


3,686,145 


417,228,870 


2,629 


14,091 


0.88 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


12,001,771 


1,003,887,161 


11,685 


7,186 


1.20 


548,177 


53,283,220 


147 


14,995 


30,104 


1.03 


6,640 


372,490 


32 


1,018 


1.78 


2,324 


88,735 


7 


77 


1,344 


2.62 


210,290 


16,916,795 


316 


4,461 


1.24 


367,337 


47,623,388 


137 


11,293 


28,654 


0.77 


14,618 


936,034 


71 


§1,057 


1.56 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


30,573 


2,069,148 


59 


3,025 


1.48 


11,112 


769,265 


16 


425 


4,007 


1.44 


68,853 


4,797,313 


240 


1,676 


1.44 


90,760 


9,817,789 


46 


3,477 


18,385 


0.92 


18,745 


1,084,160 


49 


1,922 


1.73 


21,573 


1,297,520 


15 


606 


7,723 


1.66 


111,026 


7,790,329 


204 


3,238 


1.43 


47,319 


4,222,242 


31 


1,248 


10,995 


1.12 


437,680 


29,806,757 


676 


3,533 


1.47 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


102,813 


10,272,627 


198 


4,413 


1.00 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


79,496 


6,612,052 


151 


3,661 


1.20 


83,927 


8,895,385 


26 


2,841 


26,956 


0.94 


1,921,836 


206,787,797 


1,865 


§12,584 


0.93 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


70,399 


4,225,750 


194 


1,811 


1.67 


69,885 


3,431,300 


37 


1,701 


8,055 


2.04 


16,690 


1,448,255 


36 


3,448 


1.15 


4,963 


420,130 


4 


167 


8,753 


1.18 


10,803 


651,000 


44 


1,292 


1.66 


2,125 


147,500 


1 


49 


12,292 


1.44 


91,061 


6,785,994 


280 


1,920 


1.34 


37,845 


3,697,891 


34 


1,141 


9,063 


1.02 


23,561 


1,827,598 


49 


§3,584 


1.29 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


30,794 


2,864,990 


41 


5,823 


1.07 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


75,062 


5,636,533 


93 


5,133 


1.33 


210,611 


22,241,246 


16 


5,931 


115,840 


0.95 


1,609,433 


168,931,246 


1,611 


8,717 


0.95 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


7,369 


407,348 


26 


1,306 


1.81 


207 


3,400 


2 


12 


113 


- 


24,077 


1,260,500 


72 


1,479 


1.91 


2,155 


137,000 


7 


79 


1,631 


1.57 


478,769 


45,352,400 


614 


§5,989 


1.06 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


790,563 


105,860,910 


509 


§38,222 


0.75 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


47,820 


3,151,509 


84 


3,108 


1.52 


28,267 


2,167,082 


35 


877 


5,087 


1.30 


38,914 


2,411,255 


113 


1,802 


1.61 


32,176 


2,100,628 


16 


831 


10,941 


1.53 


82,934 


6,013,888 


146 


3,319 


1.38 


239,740 


23,078,144 


43 


5,998 


43,709 


1.04 


24,067 


1,236,460 


27 


§6,869 


1.95 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


47,844 


3,677,750 


148 


§4,017 


1.30 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


8,057 


441,081 


43 


855 


1.83 


1,460 


73,333 


4 


43 


1,528 


1.99 


9,953 


585,265 


16 


2,075 


1.70 


10,267 


548,300 


16 


375 


2,948 


1.87 


24.831 


1,687,400 


79 


1,803 


1.47 


1,080 


53,600 


4 


28 


1,117 


2.01 


67,119 


5,118,774 


110 


3,896 


1.31 


68,574 


7,030,865 


19 


2,053 


30,046 


0.98 


111,377 


7,374,303 


183 


3,492 


1.51 


422,392 


39,495,038 


141 


12,580 


23,936 


1.07 


882 


25,000 


6 


321 


3.53 


- 












6,921 


534,330 


44 


979 


1.30 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 



A See introduction page 203 



248 



Municipal Electrical Service 



CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 





Popula- 
tion 


Total 
Customers 


Peak 

Load 
Decem- 
ber 
1968 


Residential Service 

(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 




Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


•11 

lis 

o o S 
So D. 


Av 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh 


Queenston 

Rainy River 

fRed Lake Twp 


561 
1,087 
2,471 
1,922 
8,470 

1,418 

19,431 

2,784 

406 

3,494 

925 

1,072 

242 

604 

100,799 

1,858 

914 

935 

4,758 

23,206 

8,922 

56,007 

280,491 

2,130 

2,203 

1,395 
10,138 
2,704 
9,953 
1,738 

2,849 

§6,100 

952 

488 

1,841 

1,360 
7,572 
3,906 
23,341 
6,018 


189 
430 

1,432 
380 

2,962 

492 
5,493 
1,166 

229 
939 

336 
455 
134 
230 
30,917 1 

535 

327 

288 

1,815 

8,513 

2,503 

16,800 

83,124 3 

685 

884 

665 
3,872 

981 
3,672 
1,328 

413 

2,094 

337 

179 

772 

573 
2,187 
1,349 
7,801 
2,195 


kw 

521 

1,297 

4,232 

1,210 

10,048 

1,862 
19,897 

2,627 

597 

2,509 

970 
801 
151 
722 
50,385 

1,525 

866 

1,093 

5,287 

27,965 

6,753 

61,642 

09,770 

2,135 

2,435 

1,886 
14,638 

2,955 
13,044 

2,015 

826 

3,769 

976 

406 

1,987 

1,672 

6,604 

4,371 

31,787 

6,727 


$ 
16,059 
42,434 

117,000 
33,081 

217,576 

40,832 
485,002 
65,041 
16,984 
82,295 

35,210 

27,407 

7,688 

19,086 

2,360,828 

52,733 

19,801 

23,918 

137,089 

678,526 

265,868 

1,321,673 

7,514,102 

57,990 

60,421 

51,942 
207,650 

91,992 
290,310 

71,234 

21,914 
142,873 
34,752 
12,864 
51,890 

42,358 
217,253 
128,112 
736,398 
176,092 


kwh 
1,690,545 
3,010,520 
7,560,900 
2,835,833 
22,673,505 

4,050,890 
42,847,573 
4,645,540 
1,550,880 
6,953,480 

2,809,015 

1,947,678 

582,605 

1,794,320 

177,406,587 

3,974,520 

1,795,603 

2,137,784 

12,182,620 

52,387,002 

19,555,110 

100,862,622 

620,506,249 

6,110,471 

5,000,003 

4,784,030 
20,688,071 

7,745,948 
25,399,681 

5,916,700 

1,655,506 
10,434,100 
2,321,414 
1,006,600 
4,694,019 

4,027,242 
18,730,801 
10,895,399 
54,168,270 
13,963,007 


184 
394 

1,143 
349 

2,669 

470 
5,107 
974 
208 
837 

324 
367 
117 
191 
27,894 

513 

278 

234 

1,671 

7,905 

2,373 

15,706 

78,392 

600 

739 

605 
3,511 

847 
3,404 
1,186 

317 
1,816 
307 
168 
698 

505 
2,044 
1,232 
6,873 
1,988 


kwh 

778 
637 
587 
669 
707 

781 
702 
401 
615 
681 

743 
392 
395 
§727 
536 

§670 
550 
755 
611 
556 

729 
541 
669 
§819 
563 

672 
494 
764 
628 
419 

437 
481 
626 
492 
574 

670 
771 
747 
657 
601 


i 

0.95 
1.41 
1 55 


Red Rock* 


1 17 


Renfrew 

Richmond 


0.96 

1.01 
1 13 


Ridgetown 

Ripley 

Rockland* 

Rockwood 

Rodney* 


1.40 
1.10 
1.18 

1.25 
1.41 
1 32 


Russell* 

St. Catharines* 


1.06 
1 33 


St. Clair Beach* 


1 33 


St. George* 

St. Jacobs 

St. Mary's 


1.10 
1.12 
1 13 


St. Thomas 


1.30 
1 36 


Sarnia 

Scarborough 


1.31 
1.21 
0.95 


Seaforth* 


1.21 
1.09 


Simcoe 

Sioux Lookout 

Smiths Falls 


1.00 
1.19 
1.14 


Southampton 

South Grimsby Twp.* 


1.20 
1.32 




1.37 




1.50 


Springfield* 

Stayner 

Stirling 


1.28 
1.11 

1.05 
1.16 


Stouffville 

Stratford* 


1.18 
1.36 


Strathroy 


1.26 



* Municipalities so indicated have general rate in effect. See note on page 230 
f Retail service provided by The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
§ Estimated 






Statement D 



249 



AND CONSUMPTION 

December 31, 1968 





Commercial Service 






Industrial Power Service 




(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 














AND WHERE APPLICABLE * SERVICE 
















UNDER GENERAL RATE 














Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Monthly • 
Consumption 
per Customer 


Av- 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Average of 
Customers' 
Monthly 
Loads BUled 


Monthly © 
Consumption 
per Customer 


Av- 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh A 


$ 


kwh 




kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 




kw 


kwh 


I 


5,031 


402,800 


5 


6,713 


1.25 




- 








- 


20,518 


1,338,403 


33 


3,432 


1.53 


1,912 


161,670 


3 


48 


4,491 


1.18 


99,000 


6,300,000 


281 


1,906 


1.57 


5,420 


350,000 


8 


173 


3,431 


1.55 


23,123 


2,001,008 


31 


5,559 


1.16 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


89,614 


7,416,203 


229 


2,778 


1.21 


107,627 


11,353,178 


64 


3,832 


14,899 


0.95 


27,774 


2,060,840 


22 


8,178 


1.35 








. 






210,467 


16,933,068 


268 


5,335 


1.24 


267,160 


26,432,178 


118 


7,689 


19,755 


1.01 


36,569 


2,138,321 


163 


1,080 


1.71 


57,196 


3,913,099 


29 


1,584 


11,245 


1.46 


4,918 


292,620 


15 


1,573 


1.68 


4,583 


341,075 


6 


129 


4,737 


1.34 


26,966 


2,002,190 


102 


3,061 


1.35 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


6,179 


383,798 


11 


2,559 


1.61 


437 


33,750 


1 


10 


2,813 


1.29 


21,845 


1,333,898 


88 


2,526 


1.64 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


2,949 


212,510 


17 


1,581 


1.39 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


6,115 


437,980 


39 


§1,690 


1.40 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


4,871,022 


559,054,421 


3,023 


15,426 


0.87 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


13,867 


994,560 


22 


§5,219 


1.39 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


20,061 


1,479,914 


49 


2,467 


1.36 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


22,441 


1,533,729 


44 


2,905 


1.46 


10,192 


508,740 


10 


383 


4,240 


2.00 


40,059 


2,829,080 


94 


2,469 


1.42 


77,208 


7,996,630 


50 


2,275 


13,740 


0.97 


257,501 


19,486,456 


461 


3,703 


1.32 


633,593 


64,535,266 


147 


16,072 


37,608 


0.98 


47,854 


3,045,980 


130 


§2,595 


1.57 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


778,115 


56,751,394 


936 


5,104 


1.37 


1,224,852 


170,820,570 


158 


33,621 


89,811 


0.72 


4,260,682 


338,922,146 


4,019 


7,326 


1.26 


4,087,422 


404,683,971 


713 


102,151 


49,376 


1.01 


39,163 


3,189,737 


85 


§4,482 


1.23 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


67,639 


4,909,904 


145 


2,692 


1.38 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


21,431 


1,567,980 


46 


2,904 


1.37 


7,071 


398,950 


14 


304 


2,375 


1.77 


155,531 


12,825,955 


294 


3,635 


1.21 


267,786 


30,543,712 


67 


7,984 


37,708 


0.88 


59,110 


3,501,170 


125 


2,236 


1.69 


13,844 


1,249,718 


9 


289 


12,252 


1.11 


160,239 


13,621,802 


243 


4,691 


1.18 


133,607 


16,310,993 


25 


3,847 


52,279 


0.82 


30,861 


1,800,700 


126 


1,191 


1.71 


26,992 


2,086,690 


16 


733 


10,539 


1.29 


28,377 


1,865,326 


96 


1,570 


1.52 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


79,346 


4,615,270 


271 


1,406 


1.72 


1,334 


59,300 


7 


52 


706 


2.25 


11,187 


668,471 


25 


2,370 


1.67 


12,374 


564,882 


5 


271 


9,415 


2.19 


4,945 


318,775 


11 


2,415 


1.55 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


15,354 


1,087,785 


52 


1,727 


1.41 


14,271 


1,415,290 


22 


432 


5,361 


1.01 


17,275 


1,193,289 


55 


1,808 


1.45 


9,949 


892,012 


13 


345 


5,718 


1.12 


86,965 


6,354,192 


112 


4,880 


1.37 


14,546 


1,119,470 


31 


473 


3,009 


1.30 


70,667 


5,004,976 


105 


4,030 


1.41 


15,693 


798,178 


12 


555 


4,927 


1.97 


1,095,389 


94,547,540 


928 


8,601 


1.16 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


79,965 


5,233,430 


153 


2,869 


1.53 


132,048 


9,945,970 


54 


3,545 


15,349 


1.33 



▲ See introduction page 203 



250 



Municipal Electrical Service 



CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Popula- 
tion 



Peak 

Load 

Decem- 

Total ber 

Customers 1968 



Residential Service 

(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



Ml 

til 

33 8. 



kw 

5,944 

5,316 

69,754 

784 

1,095 



Streetsville 5,960 1,610 

Sturgeon Falls 6,300 1,820 

Sudbury 86,291 26,540 

Sunderland 657 281 

Sundridge 720 336 

Sutton 1,564 976 2,371 

Tara 586 273 1,087 

Tavistock* 1,323 541 1,680 

Tecumseh* 4,905 1,476 3,219 

Teeswater 926 392 1,221 

Terrace Bay Twp 1,829 468 2,009 

Thamesford 1,468 463 1,599 

Thamesville 1,056 450 1,114 

Thedford 717 309 809 

Thessalon 1,625 581 1,533 

Thornbury* 1,151 596 1,729 

Thorndale 414 156 339 

fThornloe 149 34 70 

Thornton* 315 109 256 

Thorold 8,842 2,646 7,342 

Tilbury 3,449 1 ,336 3,274 

Tillsonburg 6,550 2,708 8,535 

tTimmins (incl. Schumacher) §33,000 10,200 22,229 

Toronto 671,699 231,092 872,139 

Tottenham , 909 373 784 

Trenton 13,950 4,869 20,550 

Tweed 1,670 687 2,310 

Uxbridge 2,685 1,058 3,998 

VankleekHill 1,684 594 1,602 

tVaughan Twp.* 18,436 5,692 30,553 

Victoria Harbour* 1,076 578 1,054 

Walkerton 4,248 1,531 6,420 

Wallaceburg 10,854 3,682 21,306 

Wardsville* 336 170 339 

Warkworth* 560 25 1 529 

Wasaga Beach 1,235 941 1,011 

Waterdown 2,143 639 2,096 

Waterford 2,460 889 2,415 

Waterloo 32,527 8,617 43,761 

Watford 1,261 575 2,081 



$ 

127,776 

167,619 

2,069,176 

21,347 

25,858 

74,059 

20,802 

39,651 

119,023 

27,473 

50,654 

45,747 
27,019 
22,843 
52,709 

40,433 

13,237 

3,645 

7,265 

208,344 

68,180 

169,343 

740,768 

15,309,063 

21,840 

312,981 
47,911 
88,832 
37,860 

527,543 

34,756 

118,735 

205,485 

8,706 

18,527 

42,889 
59,765 
61,352 
884,290 
39,752 



kwh 

10,795,886 

13,193,716 

205,017,961 

2,134,200 

2,318,308 

5,878,351 
2,010,280 
3,778,790 
8,266,560 
2,619,080 

5,919,486 
3,891,478 
2,325,840 
1,982,650 
3,726,021 

3,216,010 

1,036,305 

260,200 

634,700 
13,430,647 

5,314,035 

14,364,580 

55,006,700 

1,135,674,699 

2,075,250 

32,493,640 
4,967,636 
8,078,400 
3,619,670 

43,014,369 

2,571,730 

11,525,361 

16,110,630 

704,550 

1,439,396 

2,588,840 
5,143,129 
4,375,455 
74,646,894 
3,638,333 



1,387 

1,696 

23,844 

257 

305 

871 
247 
427 
1,343 
353 

414 
430 
401 
277 
529 

496 

146 

27 

89 

2,385 

1,219 

2,363 

8,894 

198,221 

347 

4,499 
606 
961 

538 
4,534 

544 

1,408 

3,241 

128 

195 

756 
557 
837 
7,640 
518 



kwh 
653 
661 
723 
692 
627 

567 
682 
738 
§507 
621 

1,196 
764 
484 
601 
604 

550 
621 
803 
601 
470 

390 
508 
517 
476 
543 

610 
684 
699 
565 
791 

§392 
689 
408 
460 

§526 

281 
779 
440 
804 
590 



* Municipalities so indicated have general rate in effect. See note on page 230 
f Retail service provided by The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
§ Estimated 

t Commenced nnerntinn ac -x rnst mnni/-ir-ialift; offor-tina lomiom 1 1QAQ 



Statement D 



251 



AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1968 





Commercial Service 






Industrial Power Service 




(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 














AND WHERE APPLICABLE * SERVICE 
















UNDER GENERAL RATE 














Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Monthly • 
Consumption 
per Customer 


Av- 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Average of 
Customers' 
Monthly 
Loads Billed 


Monthly • 
Consumption 
per Customer 


Av- 
erage 
Cost 

per 

Kwh A 


$ 


kwh 




kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 




kw 


kwh 


i 


96,900 


7,068,910 


196 


3,005 


1.37 


80,485 


8,562,002 


27 


2,177 


27,442 


0.94 


79,883 


5,467,635 


107 


4,086 


1.46 


12,506 


1,043,252 


17 


307 


5,114 


1.20 


1,201,590 


95,854,772 


2,388 


3,390 


1.25 


282,439 


22,896,749 


308 


8,710 


6,277 


1.23 


7,514 


513,720 


18 


2,378 


1.46 


4,429 


316,542 


6 


149 


4,796 


1.40 


15,139 


1,101,970 


26 


3,222 


1.37 


3,257 


204,590 


5 


101 


3,410 


1.59 


46,539 


3,197,888 


99 


2,945 


1.46 


6,562 


391,530 


6 


166 


5,438 


1.68 


11,899 


906,210 


19 


3,975 


1.31 


16,260 


1,695,620 


7 


388 


21,739 


0.96 


31,395 


2,721,670 


114 


2,016 


1.15 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


81,030 


6,955,270 


133 


§6,827 


1.17 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


13,871 


890,460 


32 


2,356 


1.56 


21,413 


1,826,270 


7 


637 


21,741 


1.17 


30,815 


2,553,918 


52 


4,214 


1.21 


5,977 


650,400 


2 


159 


27,100 


0.92 


12,814 


878,395 


27 


2,988 


1.46 


23,618 


2,203,283 


6 


520 


30,601 


1.07 


12,327 


925,255 


32 


2,410 


1.33 


23,864 


1,128,360 


17 


916 


5,531 


2.11 


5,373 


307,480 


23 


1,192 


1.75 


8,195 


557,120 


9 


231 


5,462 


1.47 


30,683 


1,910,004 


45 


3,423 


1.61 


8,739 


550,460 


7 


183 


6,553 


1.59 


49,577 


3,516,335 


100 


2,930 


1.41 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


2,267 


162,375 


7 


1,933 


1.40 


2,032 


71,190 


3 


87 


1,978 


2.85 


1,580 


78,500 


7 


935 


2.01 


- 


- 






- 




2,748 


184,280 


20 


808 


1.49 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


92,508 


5,454,213 


221 


2,034 


1.70 


167,140 


19,023,852 


40 


4,316 


38,666 


0.88 


48,193 


3,394,925 


96 


2,747 


1.42 


72,907 


4,721,260 


21 


2,726 


16,393 


1.54 


164,607 


12,187,530 


298 


3,431 


1.35 


116,621 


10,517,950 


47 


3,304 


18,453 


1.11 


480,055 


31,494,100 


1,276 


2,054 


1.52 


43,154 


3,042,500 


30 


1,152 


8,595 


1.42 


11,768,378 


835,536,255 


25,202 


2,761 


1.41 2 


6,335,954 


2,788,078,312 


7,669 


598,432 


30,355 


0.95 


5,028 


309,500 


19 


1,357 


1.62 


3,609 


215,730 


7 


133 


2,568 


1.67 


171,290 


14,502,915 


328 


3,576 


1.18 


465,823 


63,840,174 


42 


12,272 


33,000 


0.73 


26,930 


2,314,044 


66 


2,944 


1.16 


17,559 


1,207,478 


15 


703 


6,289 


1.45 


45,077 


3,164,355 


70 


3,767 


1.42 


56,234 


3,986,030 


27 


1,661 


12,535 


1.41 


17,223 


1,360,765 


49 


2,338 


1.27 


5,188 


240,860 


7 


247 


2,867 


2.15 


876,366 


87,501,847 


1,158 


6,297 


1.00 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


14,981 


990,250 


34 


§3,527 


1.51 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


72,004 


5,564,714 


99 


4,375 


1.29 


77,550 


7,750,237 


24 


2,285 


28,081 


1.00 


116,830 


9,547,650 


329 


2,393 


1.22 


728,654 


80,105,410 


112 


18,659 


59,602 


0.91 


5,842 


330,780 


42 


716 


1.77 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


6,734 


436,670 


56 


§1,716 


2.12 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


39,828 


2,071,880 


184 


928 


1.92 


310 


9,520 


1 


8 


793 


3.26 


30,276 


2,134,075 


65 


2,939 


1.42 


6,783 


480,415 


17 


195 


2,288 


1.41 


28,441 


1,810,198 


38 


4,077 


1.57 


36,447 


2,126,150 


14 


1,042 


12,219 


1.71 


728,909 


56,285,583 


880 


5,394 


1.30 


941,380 


93,987,125 


97 


19,222 


81,163 


1.00 


17,594 


1,122,390 


44 


2,126 


1.57 


49,621 


4,507,117 


13 


1,368 


27,822 


1.10 



A See introduction page 203 



252 



Municipal Electrical Service 



CUSTOMERS, REVENUE, 

for the Year Ended 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 
Customers 



Peak 
Load 
Decem- 
ber 
1968 



Residential Service 

(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 



Revenue 



Consumption 



Cus- 
tomers 



•II 



So 



Av 
erage 
Cost 

per 
Kwh 



Waubaushene* 
Webbwood* . . 
Welland* 
Wellesley* . . . 
Wellington* . . 

West Lome . . 
Westport 
Wheatley* . . . 

Whitby* 

f White River . . 

Wiarton* 
Williamsburg . 
Winchester* . . 
Windermere . . 
Windsor* .... 

Wingham .... 
Woodbridge . . 
Woodstock* . . 
Woodville* . . . 
Wyoming .... 

York* 

Zurich 



§1,500 
610 

40,315 
793 
874 

980 

601 

1,595 

23,562 

993 

1,970 

322 

1,468 

xlll 

193,004 

2,865 

2,411 

24,626 

421 

1,048 

139,052 
728 



476 
155 
12,023 
315 
487 

468 
303 
582 
6,756 
389 

857 
146 
595 
140 
60,151 

1,183 
810 

8,258 
199 
431 

45,866 

327 



kw 

635 
409 
41,468 
795 
933 

1,645 

684 

1,296 

28,966 

1,177 

2,251 
417 

2,502 

203 

203,435 

4,431 

3,033 

36,253 

463 

1,059 

109,930 
823 



$ 

24,253 
12,627 
758,531 
26,387 
25,109 

29,467 
19,186 
39,731 
570,835 
49,308 

61,699 
8,849 

46,812 

8,596 

4,285,497 

89,798 
69,555 
711,807 
11,478 
25,242 

2,697,806 
25,324 



kwh 

1,771,360 

812,090 

52,006,703 

2,181,535 

2,287,314 

2,342,960 
1,820,210 
2,962,170 
48,096,046 
2,259,400 

5,623,165 
819,087 

4,413,979 

579,250 

289,296,407 

9,686,853 
6,846,901 
61,149,824 
1,031,700 
2,219,170 

264,009,736 
1,969,430 



448 
130 
10,797 
259 
387 

411 
273 
481 
6,073 
294 

703 
124 
488 
129 
53,704 

1,059 
744 

7,295 
164 
390 

41,666 
261 



kwh 
§327 

546 
§397 
§637 

489 

476 
557 
515 
835 
647 

§626 
550 

§705 
374 
450 

763 
'768 
§670 
524 
485 

§511 
631 



i 



1.37 
1.55 
1.46 
1.21 
1.10 

1.26 
1.05 
1.34 
1.19 
2.18 

1.10 
1.08 
1.06 
1.48 
1.48 

0.93 
1.02 
1.16 
1.11 
1.14 

1.02 
1.29 



* Municipalities so indicated have general rate in effect. See note on page 230 
f Retail service provided by The Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario 
§ Estimated 
x Excluding summer population 



Statement D 



253 



AND CONSUMPTION 
December 31, 1968 





COMMERCIAL SERVICE 




Industrial Power Service 




(Including flat-rate water-heaters) 












AND WHERE APPLICABLE * SERVICE 














UNDER GENERAL RATE 


















•11 


Av- 








•a 


• §| 


Av- 








+3 c 


erage 








°e J 


■2 E 
o. o 


erage 








■*E 2 


Cost 








Jiciffl 


>tW% 


Cost 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Month 
Consu 
per Cu 


per 

Kwh 


Revenue 


Consumption 


Cus- 
tomers 


Averaf 
Custoi 
Month 
Loads 


Month 
Consul 
per Cu 


per 
Kwh A 


$ 


kwh 




kwh 


i 


$ 


kwh 




kw 


kwh 


I 


5,566 


352,950 


28 


§1,290 


1.58 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


5,609 


390,907 


25 


1,277 


1.43 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


1,527,325 


145,149,446 


1,226 


§12,505 


1.05 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


10,156 


630,365 


56 


§1,818 


1.61 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


16,995 


1,502,226 


100 


1,391 


1.13 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


13,338 


832,030 


45 


1,631 


1.60 


41,908 


2,963,680 


12 


1,150 


19,758 


1.41 


10,543 


780,330 


28 


2,282 


1.35 


220 


4,818 


2 


15 


201 


4.57 


32,929 


2,190,909 


101 


1,781 


1.50 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


665,698 


69,036,894 


683 


11,495 


0.96 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


55,659 


2,966,200 


94 


2,746 


1.88 


7,151 


486,600 


1 


76 


40,550 


1.47 


48,353 


3,532,087 


154 


§3,050 


1.37 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


6,645 


461,170 


21 


1,875 


1.44 


243 


17,280 


1 


6 


1,440 


1.41 


63,777 


6,870,290 


107 


§8,238 


0.93 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


4,672 


299,958 


11 


2,272 


1.56 


- 








- 




6,958,610 


699,389,410 


6,447 


9,083 


0.99 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


48,092 


3,883,914 


89 


3,699 


1.24 


57,530 


5,458,814 


35 


1,768 


13,186 


1.05 


24,081 


1,813,910 


55 


2,825 


1.33 


41,726 


4,502,553 


11 


1,101 


35,735 


0.93 


1,139,683 


114,707,150 


963 


§13,817 


0.99 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


4,925 


335,890 


35 


788 


1.47 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


15,270 


1,093,120 


34 


2,719 


1.40 


12,532 


719,530 


7 


395 


8,566 


1.74 


3,069,209 


313,517,745 


4,200 


§9,731 


0.98 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


14,151 


670,067 


60 


938 


2.11 


4,015 


231,995 


6 


89 


3,222 


1.73 



A See introduction page 203 



Index 



255 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 



A.M.E.U 


— Association of Municipal 


kvar 




Electrical Utilities 


kw 


bhp 


— brake horsepower 


kwh 


CANUSE — Canada-United States Eastern 


M.E.U 


cfs 


— cubic feet per second 


min 


C.L.C. 


— Canadian Labour Congress 




ehv 


— extra-high-voltage 


mw 


G.S. 


— Generating Station 


O.M.E. 


H.E.C. 


— Hydro-Electric Commission 




H.E.S. 


— Hydro-Electric System 


P.U.C. 


hp 


— horsepower 


rpm 


Jet. 


— Junction 


S.S. 


kv 


— kilovolt(s) 


T.S. 


kva 


— kilovolt-ampere(s) 


Twp. 



— kilovar(s) 

— kilowatt(s) 

— kilowatt-hour(s) 

— Municipal Electrical Utilities 

— minimum 

— minute (20-min) 

— megawatt 

— Ontario Municipal Electric 

Association 
— Public Utilities Commission 
— revolutions per minute 
— Switching Station 
— Transformer Station 
— Township 



INDEX 

In the index, all page references to tables or graphs are in italic type. No references are 
given for the alphabetically arranged listings of municipalities either in the Commission's 
financial statements or in Statements A, B, C, and D. 



A 

Abitibi Paper Co. Ltd 95 

—River 10 

Accident prevention 88 

— severity rate 88 

Accidents, fatal, number of 88 

Accounting procedure for M.E.U 150 

Acres, H. G. and Company Limited 62 

Adjustment of matured equities 28 

Adjustments, debit or credit, in cost 

of power 39 

— year-end, to interim billing 108-127 

Advances from the Province 107 

Advisory commissions 1 

Aeolian vibration 76 

Aerial lift equipment 18 

—lifts 86 

Aguasabon G.S 95 

Aids to design and development 76 

— to system operation 80 

Ajax 44 

Albany, New York 17 

Alexander G.S 95 

Algoma District 2 

All-electric apartments 43 

— commercial load 43 

Allied Construction Council 87 

Aluminum Company of Canada 76 

Amalgamation of Fort William and 

Port Arthur 48 

Amortization of frequency 

standardization 29, 34, 35 

Anchor ice 14 

Anjigami Station 72 

Annexations by municipalities 40, 43 

Annual summary 4, 5 

Anodes, galvanic 20 

Approval of electrical equipment 

and installations 42 

Armed forces base 43 

Armitage T.S 71 

Arnprior 20, 60 

Arthur 46 

Asbestos dust in generating stations 84 

Asbestosis 89 

Asphalt 79 



Assets of the Commission 4, 5, 30 

see also Financial Statements 

—fixed, of the M.E.U 148, 152-201 

—total of the M.E.U 148 

Assistance for rural construction 31 

— to agriculture 4 

Associated Electrical Industries Limited 68 
Association of Municipal Electrical 

Utilities v, 88 

Atomic Energy Control Board 50 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited .... v, 8, 

9, 12, 13, 35, 51, 64, 79, 89 

Aubrey Falls 50 

GS iii, 27, 61, 72, 73 

Audit of municipal utilities accounts 150 
Average consumption per customer, 

see Consumption 
Average cost per kwh, 

see Cost 



B 

Babcock-Wilcox and Goldie-McCulloch 

Limited 67 

Balance sheet, Commission 30, 31 

— sheets, municipal 152-201 

Bargaining 87 

Barrett Chute G.S 5-, 7, 49, 57, 58, 60, 

74, 94 

Bath 6, 50 

Beauharnois G.S 11 

Beck, Sir Adam, —Niagara No. 1 18, 94 

— Sit Adam, — Niagara No. 2 94 

Pumping-Generating Station 94 

Bell Canada 17 

Blind River 73 

T.S 73 

Boiler-tube failures 85 

Boiling mode introduced at N.P.D 14 

Bonds issued by the 

Commission 4, 28, 105-107 

see also Financial Statements, 
bonds payable 

Books of Account, M.E.U 150 

Bowmanville 44 

Area 44 



256 



Index 



Brantford 16 

Brittle fractures 85 

Bruce G.S iii, iv, 6, 50, 51 

— Nuclear Establishment 51 

Buchanan, E.V., T.S 70 

Burlington P.U.C 43 

Butyl rubber 79 



Cable, submarine, plastic-insulated 20 

Cable-heated ceilings 83 

Calabogie G.S 58 

—Lake 58 

Cameron Falls G.S 22, 95 

Campbellford 47 

Canadian-Allis-Chalmers Limited ...... 59 

Canadian ASEA Electric Limited 59 

— General Electric Company 

Limited 56, 59, 68 

— Standards Association 

Testing Laboratories 42 

— Union of Operating Engineers 87, 88 

— Union of Public Employees 88 

— Westinghouse Company Limited 56, 68 
Canadian-United States Eastern 

Power Pool 17 

CANDU 50 

station in India 13 

Capacity added to power resources .... 5, 49 

— assistance 15 

— dependable, defined 93 

— dependable, of hydraulic resources 95, 96 
—dependable peak 3, 4, 5, 94-97 

sources of purchased power 95 

— increase in, planned for 1969-1974 49 

— of coal pile at Lakeview G.S 67 

— of combustion-turbines installed 68 

— of Commission resources 94, 95, 96 

— of generating resources 94, 95, 96 

— of resources iii, 7 

Capital construction program 50, 51 

— investment 

see Financial Statements 

Caribou Falls 95 

Cathodic protection 20 

Cavitation 22 

Ceiling-cable installation 82 

Central Electricity Generating Board .... 84 

—Region 1, 16, 44, 70, 141 

Centralia 43 

Chatham 43 

S.S 74 

Chats Falls G.S 85, 94 

Chenaux G.S 58, 94 

Cherrywood S.S 71 

Circuit-breaker, new design 81 

Circulating power 16 

Claremont 69 

Classes of rural service defined 136 

Coal, quantity delivered 56 

Coal delivered to Lambton G.S 63 

— quantities delivered 56 

Coal-tar epoxy 86 

Cobalt 62 

Cochrane District 2 

Coldwater 46 

Collective agreements 87 

Collingwood 46 

Combustion Engineering Superheater 

Limited 67 



—turbines 8, 14, 15, 19, 49, 68, 94 

Commercial service 145, 150 

M.E.U 150, 252-253 

rural 138 

— space-heating 38 

Commissioners v, 1 

Commission-owned distribution 

facilities 102, 103 

Communications 17, 80, 81 

COMPEC 43, 44 

Compensation Board, Ontario 89 

Computer technology 80 

Conciliation procedures 87 

Conference and Development Centre 90 

plans for extending 90 

Construction craft unions 87 

— man-hours in 88 

— program 89 

Consumption, average per customer 138, 

146 

farm service 138 

industrial power service 138, 146 

municipal service 146 

rural service 138, 139 

Consumption of energy 

direct customers 39, 99 

municipalities 38, 98 

rural 99 

Contamination on insulators 77 

Control 17, 52, 53, 54, 80 

Cooksville T.S 70 

Coopers Falls Jet 74 

Corrosion 85 

Cost allocated to customers 29, 127 

— average per kwh 138, 146 

municipal systems 146, 232-253 

rural service 138 

— of operation 29 

— of primary power 5, 26, 29, 127 

adjustments, annual 29, 127 

statement of 108-126 

— of providing service 29, 127 

— of purchased power 29 

see also Financial Statements— Cost 
Costing load of the municipalities .. 108-126 

Costs of the Commission 26, 29 

see also Financial Statements — Cost 
Customers, number of 

direct 36, 39 

farm 41, 138-143 

municipal 752, 153 

retail 36 

rural 41, 138-143 

served by M.E.U 145, 152-201, 

232-253 

served under general rate 148 

ultimate served 36 

Cyrville D.S 47 



D 

Debenture capital, scarcity of iv 

Debt, debenture, M.E.U 150 

— from borrowings 26, 27 

— long-term of the Commission 

see Financial Statements, liabilities 
—of the M.E.U. 

see Municipal electrical utilities 

— payable in U.S. funds 106 

— retirement 34, 106 

DeCew Falls G.S 22, 94 



Index 



257 



Department of Communications of 

Federal Government 53 

— of Municipal Affairs 48, 145 

Dependable peak capacity 4, 5 

of East System 96 

of West System 97 

Depreciation, accumulated 
Commission 

see Financial Statements 
M.E.U. 
see Municipal electrical Utilities 

—provision 5, 26, 29, 30, 34 

Des Joachims G.S 94 

Deterioration in high-voltage bushings . 19 

Detroit Edison Company 70, 95 

—River 70 

Digital demand recorders 17 

Direct customers 25, 36, 39 

see also Customers, direct 
Distribution facilities, Commission- 
owned 102 

Diversity in stream flows 93 

Dock at Lakeview G.S 66 

Douglas Point v, 51 

Douglas Point Nuclear 

Power Station iii, iv, 6, 8, 9, 

12, 13, 16, 50, 51, 56 



East System 1, 7, 8, 9, 11, 21, 57, 

68, 73, 145, 140-143 
Eastern Region .... 1, 16, 24, 71, 142, 143 
East-West Interconnection .... 21, 54, 72, 73 

Eganville 47 

P.U.C 47 

Ehv facilities, see Extra-high-voltage 
Eldorado Mining and Refining Limited . 56 
Electric heating of microwave antennas 55 

— space-heating 37 

— water-heating 38 

Electrical maintenance 18 

— Modernization Program 38 

Electrically heated apartment buildings . 45 

Electronics 80, 81 

Electrostatic precipitators 65, 67 

Elmira 43 

T.S 70 

Employees, number of 89 

Energy consumption, see Consumption 
— delivered by Commission to 

M.E.U 97, 98 

— delivered to interconnected 

systems 97, 99 

—generated and purchased .... 4, 5, 8, 95, 96 
— primary, delivered to 

interconnected utilities 97, 99 

— produced by hydro-electric 

generating stations 9, 94, 95 

— produced by thermal-electric units 94, 95 
— production for commercial load .... 3, 4, 5 
— purchased 9, 95, 97 

by M.E.U 97, 98 

—requirements of M.E.U 39 

—sales to direct customers 97, 99 

— supplied to Commission 

customers 4, 5, 97, 98, 99 

primary 

to direct industrial customers 

39, 97, 99 

to interconnected systems 97, 99 

to M.E.U 97 y 98 

Epoxy 86 



Equities accumulated through debt 

retirement charges and 

interest 28, 31, 152-201 

Equity in Ontario Hydro Systems, 

defined 148, 149 

— municipal in Ontario Hydro 

systems 31, 148, 149, 152-201 

Erosion 85 

Essa T.S 54 

Essex County 43 

Executive Council of the Province 

of Ontario 1 

Exeter 43 

Expenditures on fixed assets 26, 103 

see also Financial Statements, 
Assets, fixed 
Expense of the M.E.U 150, 152-201 

see also Municipal electrical utilities 
Extra-high-voltage facilities 68, 77 



Failures, boiler-tube 85 

Farm customers, see Customers 

— service 98, 137 

rates 137 

— services, number of 138-143 

Fatal accidents, number of 88 

Fatigue tests 79 

Federal government 64 

Felts 79 

Fergus 43 

Financial features of the Commission .... 4 

—operations of M.E.U 152-201 

— position, summary of 26-28 

— Statements — 

advances from the province 31, 107 

assets 30 

assets, fixed 30, 102, 103 

assistance, Provincial 31 

balance sheet 30, 31 

bonds payable 31, 105, 106 

capital 31 

cost of power 29, 108-127 

— of providing service .... 29, 108-127 

depreciation 29, 30, 34, 104 

frequency standardization 29, 33, 34, 

104 
funded debt, see bonds payable 

liabilities 31 

operations, financial, statement of 29 
pension and insurance fund 91 

reserve provision 29 

revenue 29 

sinking fund equity 31, 32 

stabilization of rates 32, 33 

Fitter-mechanic apprentices 22 

Fixed assets, investment in, M.E.U 149 

Fly ash 67 

Fog chamber for testing 77 

Forestry 22 

Fort William 48, 49, 68 

Fountain Falls G.S 62 

Frequency rate of lost-time accidents 88 

—standardization 29, 30, 34, 35, 127 

see also Financial Statements 

— trend relays 82 

Freshet 9, 10 

Fuel used for generation 26 

Fuelling operations at Douglas Point 

Nuclear Power Station 13 

Fuel-oil, quantities delivered 56 



258 



Index 



Galloping of conductors 77 

Gatineau Power Company 47 

system 11 

General rate 145, 228-231 

M.E.U 150 

— service 228-253 

Generating capacity added iii 

— facilities operated by municipal 

utilities 39 

—stations 94, 95 

see also individual listings 

see also Financial Statements — assets 

Generation development 50, 51 

Geological investigations at 

Lakeview G.S 65 

George W. Rayner G.S. 

see Rayner, George W., G.S. 

Georgetown 69 

Georgian Bay Region 1, 21, 24, 46, 

70, 141 

Glazes, semi-conducting, surface 77 

Gloucester Township H.E.C 47 

Goderich 43 

Goldenberg Centennial Canadian 

Construction Association Report 88 

Government of Canada 64 

— of Ontario 1, 4 

Gravenhurst 46 

Great Britain 84 

Great Lakes Power 

Corporation 12, 72, 73, 95 

Ground fault interrupting device 42 

Guide to the Report 6 



H 

Hamilton 68 

-Elgin T.S 70, 74 

-Stirton T.S 74 

-Toronto area 68 

-H.E.C 43 

Hanmer T.S 16 

Hanover T.S 16, 71 

Harmon G.S 94 

Havelock T.S 71 

Hazards in swimming-pool installations .. 42 

Head office building 57 

Health hazards 84, 88, 89 

Hearn, Richard L., G.S 94 

Hearst 48 

Heat-by-light principle 38 

Heat-exchanger tubesheet joints 79 

Heat-exchangers 79 

Heating, electric .... 37, 43, 45, 46, 204-225 

Heat-pump installation 44 

Heavy water iv, v 50 

Heavy-water plant at Douglas Point 51 

Heely Falls G.S 71 

Helicopter equipped with infra-red 

television devices 20, 21 

Helicopters 21 

purchase of new models 22 

Hespeler 43 

High interest rates 150 

High-speed vacuum circuit-breaker 81 

High-voltage laboratories 77 

— transmission lines 100 

High-voltage-line insulators 77 

Hockley Valley 90 



Holden, Otto, G.S 94 

House heating 204-225 

Howden and Parsons Limited 67 

Huntsville 46 

Hydro-electric capacity to be added 49 

— energy generated 94, 95, 96 

— energy output in West System 14 

— generating stations 9, 27, 94, 95 

— Power Commission, defined 1 

— production 94, 95 

— resources 94, 95 

Hydro-Quebec Power 

Commission 11, 13, 95 

Hydrogen 85 



I 

Ice in Lakeview G.S. intake channel 15 

— in Niagara River 14 

— storms 16 

Income, net, of M.E.U 152-201 

see also Municipal Electrical 
Utilities 

Increase in debenture debt, M.E.U 149 

— in miles of rural line 41 

— in miles of transmission line 100 

— in power requirements during 1968 iii 

—in staff 12, 89 

Increases in rates v, 25, 37 

India 13, 50, 89 

Industrial customers, see Customers, 

direct industrial 
—power service : 98, 99, 138, 145 

M.E.U 146, 150, 204-253 

rural 138-144 

— space-heating 38 

Inflation v 

Infra-red photography in detection 

of hot joints 18, 20 

Insecticides, toxicity and handling of 89 

Inspection, electrical 42 

Instrumentation for control at 

Lakeview G.S 68 

Insulating shield for live-line work 21 

Insulators, high-voltage-line 77 

Insurance fund 91 

Interconnected systems 52 

—utilities 97, 99 

Interconnection East-West 

Systems 1, 72, 73 

— with Great Lakes Power Corporation 72 
Interconnections with neighbouring 

utilities 16, 17 

Interest expense 26 

— rates iv, 150 

Interim billing 109-126 

— rates to municipalities 4, 38, 109-126 

International Joint Commission 8 

Interruptible load 93, 96 

Interruptible-power contracts 93, 96 

Isotropic stress 79 

Investment of M.E.U. in fixed 

assets 152-201 

see also Municipal Electrical Utilities 



J 

J. Clark Keith G.S. 

see Keith, J. Clark, G.S. 

Joint committee work with unions 88 

Jones-type station 70 



Index 



259 



K 

Kakabeka Falls G.S 22 

Keith, J. Clark, G.S 54, 94 

Kingston iv, 50 

-Gardiner T.S 71 

P.U.C 47 

Kitchener 43, 82 

P.U.C 43 

Kleinburg T.S 16, 54, 68 



Labour relations 87, 88 

Lake Erie 16, 49, 64 

Lake Huron 50, 68 

Lake Ontario 6, 16, 50, 64, 65, 68 

Lake Timiskaming 62 

Lakehead T.S 72, 73 

Lakeview G.S 5, 17, 11, 12, 15, 22, 27, 

49, 51,65,70,74, 87, 94 

Lambton County 63 

—G.S 5, 27, 35, 49, 50, 54, 63, 69, 

70, 74, 78 

— T.S 69, 70 

Lasers 89 

Latex-type ceiling finish 83 

Leaside T.S 57 

Legislature, Provincial 1 

Lenkurt Electric Company of 

Canada Limited 54 

Lennox G.S iv, 6, 50 

Liabilities, long-term 

see Financial Statements 

Lieutenant-Governor in Council 1 

Line maintenance 20 

— traps 53 

Little Long G.S 94 

Live-line maintenance 20, 21 

Load cut 93 

under interruptible contracts 11,15, 93, 96 

— shedding 82 

London 16, 43 

-Nelson T.S 70 

Long Branch Rifle Ranges 65 

Long-term debt 31 

see also Financial Statements, 
Bonds payable 

Lower Notch G.S 27, 50, 62 



M 

Machining of bent turbine shaft 22 

Maclaren-Quebec Power Company 11 

Madawaska River .. iii, 6, 27, 49, 57, 58, 

60, 61 

Maintenance, electrical 18 

—line 20, 90 

— mechanical 22 

Manby T.S 68, 71 

Management courses and seminars 90 

Manitou Falls G.S 95 

Marathon T.S 72, 73 

Margin of reserve capacity ... iii, 11, 96, 97 

—of net income 150 

Marketing program v, 37 

Martindale, R.H., T.S 54, 71, 73 

Massena, New York 16 

Meaford T.S 71 



Mechanical maintenance 22 

Medical health authorities 89 

— Science Building, University 

of Toronto 45 

— services 88 

Merrickville 47 

Metropolitan Toronto 49, 64, 65, 68 

Michipicoten River 72 

Microfoil spray boom 23 

Microwave communication system 51 

— radio system 54, 80 

Midland 46 

P.U.C 46 

Middleport T.S 68, 69 

Milton 69 

Miscellaneous studies and 

developments 82 

Mississagi River iii, 6, 27, 49, 61, 62 

—T.S 54, 72, 73 

Mississauga 65 

H.E.C 44 

Montreal River 6, 27, 49, 62 

Mount Sinai Hospital 57 

Mountain Chute G.S 57, 94 

Multi-flue chimney at Nanticoke G.S 64 

Multiple dwelling units, electrically 

heated 37 

Municipal Affairs, Department of, 

Ontario 48, 145 

—Directory for 1969 145 

— distribution systems 152-253 

Municipal electrical utilities .... v, 1, 2, 25, 

36, 37, 38, 39, 43, 88, 145, 

148, 149, 150, 152-253 

accounts 152-201 

assets, fixed, at cost 152-201 

commercial service .... 146, 147, 204-253 
cost, average per kwh 146, 147, 232-253 

cost contract 29, 152-253 

cost of power 29, 108-127 

customers served 4, 5, 146, 152-201, 

232-253 

debt 152-201 

depreciation 152-201 

energy consumption 97, 98, 146, 

147, 232-253 

—supplied 38, 108-124 

equity in Ontario Hydro systems 152-201 

financial operations 152-201 

industrial power service ... 146, 205-231 

net income 152-201 

power supplied 38, 108-124, 232-253 

rates, interim 109-125 

—retail 204-231 

residential service 146, 204-231 

revenue 152-201 

— systems, number of 36, 145 

Municipalities 152-253 

Muskoka T.S 71, 74 



N 

Nanticoke G.S 5, 22, 27, 49, 50, 

64, 69 
National House Builders' Association .... 82 

— Research Council 20 

Natural uranium 50 

Neoprene 86 

Neoprene-hypalon 79 

Nepean Twp. H.E.C 47 



260 



Index 



Net income of M.E.U. 

see Municipal electrical utilities 

— revenue of M.E.U. 150 

New York Pool Control Centre 17 

Newcastle 44 

Newmarket 69 

Niagara Falls 16 

Niagara-Murray T.S 70 

Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation .... 95 

—Region 140 

—River 9, 10, 14, 85, 86 

Nickel in tubesheet overlay 79 

Nickel industry 48 

Noise 89 

North America 64 

—Bay 48, 57 

H.E.C 38, 48 

Northeastern Region .... 1, 48, 57, 71, 142 
Northwestern Region .... 2, 43, 48, 71, 143 

Nova Scotia v, 51 

Nuclear fuel 56 

— Power Demonstration 13, 14 

— Training Centre 13 

Nuclear-electric additions iv 

— generating stations 79, 90 

— operations 12 

Number of electrically-heated 

single dwellings 37 

— of employees, average 89 

— of rural customers served 40 

— of trainees at Nuclear Training 

Centre 13 

— of ultimate customers served 36 



Office buildings 57 

O.M.E.A., see Ontario Municipal Electric 

Association 

Ontario, Province of 1, 42, 50, 64 

— Development Corporation 43 

—Electrical Code 42 

— Electrical League 82 

— Hydro Employees Union 87 

— Hydro Research Quarterly 75 

— Hydro W. P. Dobson Research 

Laboratory 75 

— Labour Relations Board 87, 88 

— Municipal Electric Association v, 88 

—Power G.S 94 

Operations, statement of Commission 29 

see also Financial Statements 
— municipal 152-20 J 

see also Municipal electrical utilities 

Orangeville 90 

Orders placed in 1968 55 

Orono 44 

Oshawa-Wilson T.S 70 

Ottawa-Hawthorne T.S 71 

Ottawa-Riverdale T.S 71 

Ottawa-Slater T.S 71 

Ottawa H.E.C 47 

—River 10, 58 

— Valley Power Company 95 

Otter Rapids G.S 94 

Output of hydro-electric stations ... 94, 95 

Overhead maintenance 90 

Owen Sound T.S 71 



Pakistan 13, 50 

Parking garage completed 57 

Parsons, C. A. of Canada Limited .... 65, 67 
PASNY, see Power Authority of the 

State of New York 

Peak load of direct customers 39 

—load of M.E.U 38, 39 

— requirement 7 

— requirements of direct industrial 

customers 39 

— requirements of M.E.U 39 

— requirements of Toronto H.E.S 45 

Penetanguishene Area 46 

Pension and Insurance Fund 91 

Penville 69 

Pesticides Act, 1967 23 

— toxicity and handling of 89 

Peterborough 20 

P.U.C 47 

Pickering G.S iv, 5, 13, 27, 49, 

50, 56, 64, 79 

— Township 44, 64 

Pine Portage G.S 95 

Plastics, glass reinforced 77 

Plyant 84 

Pollutants, effects of 77 

Pollution, air 89 

Polymers 79, 83, 86 

Ponding operations 7 

Porcupine T.S 68 

Port Arthur 48, 72, 73 

Area 48 

— Colborne 43 

— Dover 49, 64 

—Elgin 50 

— Perry 44 

Power Authority of the State of 

New York 16, 95 

— Commission Act 1, 2, 42, 150 

— development program iv, 50, 51 

— produced for commercial load 94, 95 

—purchased 3, 9, 11, 95, 97 

— requirements iii 

— resources 94, 97 

Prime Minister of Ontario 65 

Program of capital construction 50, 51 

Progress on power developments 57 

Protection 17, 52, 53, 54, 80, 81 

Protective coatings 85 

Province of Ontario 1, 42, 50, 64 

— of Quebec 50 

Provincial advances 31, 107 

— Legislature 1 

Provision for depreciation 5 

— for reserve for stabilization of 

rates and contingencies .... 5, 29, 32, 34 

Public health authorities 89 

— Utilities Act 4 

Purchased energy 9, 96 



Q 

Quebec Hydro-Electric Commission 11, 95 

— Province of 89 

Queen Elizabeth Way 74 

Queen's Park 57 



Index 



261 



Radiant heating installation 82 

Radiation protection training 89 

Rajasthan Nuclear Station 13 

Rand, late Justice Ivan C, Report 88 

Rate adjustment, retail 150 

— increases v, 25, 37 

— stabilization 34, 35, 127 

Rates 

farm 137, 144 

house-heating 204-225 

interim 108-126 

municipal retail 150, 204-231 

rural 144 

Rayner, George W., G.S 94 

Rebates to municipalities 109-125 

Red Rock Falls G.S 94 

Reforestation 24 

Refunds to municipalities, 
see Rebates 

Regional school boards 38 

Regions, Reports from 43, 48 

Relays, electronic, protective 81 

— frequency-trend 82 

Renfrew 58 

Replacement of deteriorated 

bushings 19 

Requirements — energy 97 

—of direct customers 39, 40, 97, 99 

— primary energy 97 

— power 4, 5, 1 

Research and testing activities 75 

Reserve capacity 68, 93 

— for stabilization of rates and 

contingencies 28, 34, 35, 127 

see also Financial Statements, 
reserve provision 

— provision 29, 34, 35 

see also Financial Statements, 
reserve provision 

Reserves of power 97 

Residential service 98 

municipal systems 146, 147, 150, 

204-253 

rural 138-143 

Resources 3, 4, 5, 94, 95, 96 

see also Capacity, dependable peak 

hydro-electric 94, 95 

thermal- electric 94, 95 

Retail customers of the Commission 25, 36 

— distribution facilities 102 

— distribution of electricity 146, 147, 

232-253 

— rate adjustment 150 

— rates 144 

for M.E.U 204-231 

—service 2, 145, 146, 147 

by Commission 36, 145 

by municipalities 145 

Revenue— of the Commission 5, 25, 29 

from direct customers 29 

from M.E.U 29, 108-127 

from retail customers 29, 146 

from rural customers 138, 139 

from sales of primary power and 

energy 29 

from sales of secondary power and 

energy 5, 29 

—of M.E.U 150, 152-201 

Richard L. Hearn G.S. 

see Hearn, Richard L., G.S. 
Richmond Hill H.E.C 44 



Richview Control Centre 17 

— T.S 54, 68, 70, 74 

Rio Algom Mines Limited 
Robarts, The Honourable John P. 
Robert Moses- St. Lawrence 

Development 16 

Robert H. Saunders — St. Lawrence G.S. 

see Saunders, Robert H., 
St. Lawrence G.S. 

Roehampton Jet 74 

Roofing materials 79 

Royal Conservatory of Music . 57 

Rural assistance, Provincial 31 

— customers, number of 41, 138-143 

— distribution facilities 140-143 

— electric service 40, 41, 138-144 

— Electrical Code Supplement 42 

— energy consumption 98, 99 

— Hydro-Electric Distribution Act 4 



St. Clair Power Plant 70 

St. Clair River 63 

St. Isidore T.S 71 

St. James Town Development 45 

St. Lawrence River 9, 10 

St. Lawrence T.S 16, 71 

Sales of energy 98, 99 

— of secondary energy 14 

Sand-filled epoxy 86 

Sandwich West Twp 43 

Sarnia 43, 49, 63 

-Imperial T.S 69 

-Scott T.S 54, 69 

Saunders, Robert H., 

St. Lawrence G.S 7, 94 

Schools, electrically heated 38 

Seaforth T.S 54 

Seasonal residential service 139, 144 

Secondary energy 29, 96, 97, 99 

sales 99 

Seedling trees planted 24 

Self-damping conductor 76 

Sentinel lighting 42 

Service buildings 57 

Services to customers 42 

Shear stability of hydraulic fluids 86 

— strength of soils 78 

Shedding of loads 11, 82 

Sheridan Park 13 

Sidney T.S 71 

Silicone 79 

Silver Falls G.S 95 

Single dwellings, electrically heated 37 

Sinking fund — of the Commission 32 

see also Financial Statements 

— fund on debentures 150 

— fund provision 29, 32, 34 

Soil strength tests 78 

Solvents, toxicity and handling of 89 

Soot, erosion by 85 

South March T.S 74 

Space exploration 80 

Special customers served 36, 99 

Spillage 10 

Stabilization of rates and contingencies 

reserve 32 

Staff statistics 89 

—training 89, 90 



262 



Index 



Standard procedures in M.E.U. 

accounting 150 

Stand-by power for emergencies 68 

Statistics on staff 4, 5 

Statutes of Ontario 1 

Stewartville G.S iii, 20, 27, 50, 57, 58, 

60, 94 

Storage conditions 9 

Stratford 43 

T.S 54 

Stream-flow conditions 9, 10 

Street lighting 150 

Stress relief 78 

Strike, construction 65, 88 

— rotating 87 

Strike, W. Ross 65 

Strikes in Massena 16 

Sudbury 48, 54, 71, 73 

Supervision over M.E.U 150 

Supervisory training 90 

Supply 55 

System protection and control 80 



Tecumseh 43 

Telemetering 53 

Thermal-electric additional capacity 

planned 49 

— energy generated 94, 95, 96 

— generating stations 9, 26, 27, 56, 88, 

90, 94, 95, 102, 103 

— resources 94, 95 

Thermite used for ice removal 15 

Thessalon 54, 61, 62 

Thunder Bay District 2 

—Bay G.S 7, 14, 22, 49, 68, 95 

Thunderstorms 16 

Tilbury 43 

Timmins 68 

Tiny Township 46 

Toronto iv, 16, 49, 57 

-Dominion Centre 45 

-Duplex T.S 70, 74 

-Teraulay T.S 70 

General Hospital 89 

H.E.S 45 

Power G.S 86 

Toxicity of solvents 89 

Trade group training 90 

Training 90 

and Development Centre 90 

program for electrical maintenance 19 
Transfer from reserve to 

offset costs 29, 33, 127 

— of rural customers following 

annexations 40, 43, 46, 48 

Transformer stations 68 

Transients 81 

Transmission line inspection 21 

— lines 73 

extra-high-voltage 68 

total mileage 4, 5, 100 

see also Financial Statements, 
assets, fixed 



Trenton 71 

Trolling Lake Block Dam 61 

Tubesheets in heat exchangers 79 



U 

Ultrasonic testing 85 

Underground cable 71, 74 

— distribution 43 

— duct in Toronto 46 

— installation 44, 45, 47 

— maintenance 90 

Uniform system of accounts, M.E.U 150 

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 

Joiners of America 88 

United States v, 52 

Upper Notch G.S 62 

Uranium Oxide 56 

Utility capital expenditure 43 



V 

Vacuum circuit-breaker 81 

Value of orders placed 55 

Vapour barriers 79 

Vaughan Twp. Hydro System 38 

Victoria Harbour 46 

Vinyl 86 

Viscosity characteristics of 

hydraulic fluids 86 



W 

Wallaceburg T.S 70 

Water-heaters, electric 38 

Water spillage 57 

— treatment at Lakeview G.S 67 

Waterloo P.U.C 43 

Wawa T.S 72, 73 

Weathering, natural 79 

Welland 43 

Canal relocation 43 

Wells G.S 50, 62, 72 

West Ferris Twp 38, 48 

West System 1, 7, 9, 10, 14, 21, 68, 

72, 73, 143, 145 
Western Region .... 1, 16, 22, 43, 69, 140 

Whitby 44 

Whitedog Falls G.S 95 

Widdifield Twp 38, 48 

Windsor 43 

Utilities Commission 43 

Winter peak in January 7 

Withdrawals from Reserve for 
Stabilization of Rates and 
Contingencies 5, 32, 33, 34 



Y 

Year-round residential customers 139 

— residential service 139 

York, Borough of, Hydro System 44 



7. APR 7 1972 













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